GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-08) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Voters say "yes" to city-run broadband in Colorado
519 points by peterjmag
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/11/voters-reject-cable-...
___________________________________________________________________
 
tooltalk - 2 hours ago
Knowing so little about the situation in Colorado, why can't they
just allow more competition in the city, instead of running it
themselves?
 
  sanderjd - 2 hours ago
  (I live in Boulder County, which passed something similar.)As far
  as I know, competition is allowed, it just doesn't exist. The
  market has failed to provide us with broadband options. This vote
  is not actually for the government to run it themselves, it's
  just to override a state-level ban on municipal broadband. The
  next step will be for Comcast to lobby against municipalities
  actually setting up competing broadband offerings. A few steps
  after that and Comcast might actually start responding as if they
  are competing in an actual market, for instance by improving
  their services and/or lowering their prices. If they clean up
  their act enough, they might even get to keep their monopoly. But
  their reputation is already so bad that it seems somewhat
  unlikely at this point.
 
    mtnsun - 1 hours ago
    The Boulder vote was to override the ban, but the Fort Collins
    vote was to allow the city to grab $150M in bonds for fiber
    deployment.  FoCo already voted to override the ban a few years
    ago.
 
  wafflesraccoon - 52 minutes ago
  There are other ISPs in Fort Collins (CenturyLink/FRII) but it is
  something like 90%~ of the town is serviced by Comcast. This
  gives them massive amounts of control when it comes to pricing in
  the town.
 
  s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
  Few want to compete against such an entity as Comcast. Hell, most
  of the other large ISPs don't want to.
 
[deleted]
 
bkeroack - 2 hours ago
What are the odds that the city will run an ISP better than, say,
the DMV?
 
  antisthenes - 2 hours ago
  What's wrong with how DMV is run?My state's DMV has essentially
  moved to a mostly online system where you pay online and get
  documents mailed to you. I think the only reason to ever show up
  at the DMV is to take or re-take your driving test.All the
  renewals are done online. I haven't been to the DMV in almost a
  decade.
 
  sliverstorm - 2 hours ago
  Residents are generally happy with the other municipal utilities
  provided in Fort Collins.
 
  mtnsun - 1 hours ago
  As a resident, I can honestly say that Fort Collins' city
  government is exceptionally well run.  That's one of the reasons
  why we voted in favor of this.
 
  avdempsey - 2 hours ago
  Pretty good actually. My main gripe with the DMV is the time
  spent waiting in line. That's hard to scale. To make the line go
  faster you need to hire more people. Your driver's license is an
  important security touch point, so it's going to be hard to move
  away from getting it in person. An ISP is pretty different from
  that, right?
 
    Johnny555 - 2 hours ago
    The California DMV has an appointment system that will let you
    avoid (mostly) waiting, just go at your appointed time and (in
    my experience) you'll be served within 10 minutes of that time,
    if not earlier.They also have a online wait-time monitor for
    offices online, so you can look at neighboring cities for a
    shorter wait, it could be worth a 15 minutes drive to a more
    distance office to save 45 minutes of waiting.
 
  bduerst - 2 hours ago
  DMV is run by the state, not the city.  Municipal level
  organizations are police and fire, which can be run very
  efficiently.
 
  Steko - 2 hours ago
  They don?t need to run it better than the DMV to beat Comcast.
 
    brixon - 1 hours ago
    This is why it is so sad, but true.
 
  lotharbot - 2 hours ago
  I lived in a community with municipal broadband (Brigham City, UT
  / UTOPIA fiber) and it was extremely well run. There were still
  private ISPs handling basically everything, it's just that they
  used city-owned fiber and offered very reasonable rates.
 
    bkeroack - 2 hours ago
    So this is essentially the taxpayer paying to build out
    infrastructure that private enterprise then runs and collects
    profits on right? This is a good thing? Wasn't that always the
    argument why pharmaceutical companies are so evil, because they
    appropriate public research for private profit?
 
      zlynx - 2 hours ago
      The infrastructure collects fees to pay for itself,
      generally. It isn't provided to private enterprise for free.
 
  H1Supreme - 2 hours ago
  In my observations, problems at the DMV are usually because of
  the public, not the DMV. People show up to register a car without
  a title, have missing paperwork to get a license plate, and are
  generally unprepared.The DMV spells out what you need online, but
  people show up and need every little thing explained to them. I'm
  at the counter for 5 minutes, pay my fees, and walk out the
  door.Why was this other goof-ball at the window for 25 minutes?
  99% of the time, because they did something wrong.
 
    dfee - 1 hours ago
    No need for heavy stats here, but let's look at popular opinion
    of the DMV. If there is broad variance in the amount of time it
    takes to tackle simple issues (such as paying a fine), then I'd
    suggest someone look at the process, the operations, or both. A
    "human behavior be damned" perspective isn't going to help
    anyone.
 
      moosey - 40 minutes ago
      > let's look at popular opinion of the DMVLet's look at
      popular opinion of Comcast!In all seriousness, we are exiting
      (I hope) a time of anti-government fervor where no matter
      what the government did (unless it's the police and military)
      it was by default assumed to be done poorly.  I no longer
      think this is the case, and there is a ton of stuff that our
      government does extremely well.
 
    sixstringtheory - 1 hours ago
    Don't forget that the people who work at the DMV are the
    public, and they aren't perfect. I've had so many different
    sets of requirements explained to me by different people,
    counter clerks who wouldn't accept paperwork that was just
    examined by the line-keeper/ticket-giver, situations where one
    clerk tried to turn me away where their neighbor said "What's
    the problem? Here, gimme that..." and 5 minutes later
    everything is taken care of.
 
Bromskloss - 3 hours ago
I hear a lot of people being dissatisfied with Comcast. What is it
that makes them so hard to compete with that people have to resort
to city-run networks?
 
  skykooler - 3 hours ago
  They have a lot of lobbying power.
 
  rayiner - 2 hours ago
  The real explanation is that cities make competing hard through
  well intentioned but misguided requirements. Getting a cable
  franchise means shouldering substantial public interest
  obligations, in particular the obligation to serve a whole city
  without regard to proven demand. (You can tell that?s the real
  reason because waiver of that requirement was the key concession
  Google demanded where it rolled out Fiber.)Your financial
  viability as an infrastructure provider is do, instead by your
  uptake rate. Most of your cost is in passing each house. Your
  cost per customer is thus driven by your uptake ratio
  (subscribers divided by houses passed). Fiber deployments
  struggle to get to 0.4 or so, meaning you have to pass 2.5 houses
  for each paying customer. Forcing build out in all neighborhoods
  tanks your uptake ratio by forcing you to build in lots of places
  where people can?t necessarily afford your service.
 
    s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
    At the same time, without those requirements, only the most
    profitable (read: rich) neighborhoods would be cherry picked,
    leaving the rest of us without service. That would make the
    digital divide even bigger, widening the gap between rich and
    poor.
 
      rayiner - 1 hours ago
      My neighborhood isn?t rich by any means, and I can get
      gigabit fiber from either Verizon or Comcast. Verizon is
      about breaking even on FiOS at $110/month per subscriber
      (including television). That?s affordable for a lot of
      people. (It?s about as much as my electric bill, and less
      than my heating bill or car insurance).It would leave out
      people near the poverty line. But the government can
      subsidize those people specifically, or build municipal
      networks in those areas. Better to do that than to distort
      the entire market by requiring every telecom provider to
      basically run a public service arm. That ensures only mega-
      corps can afford to get into the businsss.It?s illustrative
      to look at what Stockholm did. A municipal entity built the
      dark fiber, but it was not subsidized. Nor was it subject to
      any build out requirement or mandatory cross subsidies. The
      entity built out based on demand, targeting businesses first.
      The resulting service is actually pretty expensive (about
      $130 for gigabit, plus a fee for building the fiber if
      necessary). For rural areas, the government simply gave a tax
      subsidy for rural residents to pay to wire themselves with
      fiber.I?ll also note that we don?t build other kinds of
      utilities this way either! If there isn?t sufficient demand
      for sewer or water, a water utility simply doesn?t build it.
      And it charges every house about $20-30,000 to do so,
      regardless of whether they can afford it.
 
  c0nducktr - 3 hours ago
  City run broadband delivers a higher quality service at a lower
  cost everywhere I've heard of it happening. It's hardly something
  they have to 'resort' to. I wish my city was so lucky.
 
  jclulow - 3 hours ago
  I don't really see why having the city run its own Internet
  service should be considered a resort.  Getting the profit motive
  as far away from basic utilities like Internet transit as
  possible seems like a win, because you don't want an
  undifferentiated bit pipe to have to continue to make more and
  more money over time.
 
    prophesi - 3 hours ago
    My city has a pretty sweet hybrid of this. We have a local
    company that provides electricity/cable/internet which received
    grants from the city to get off the ground. But it's now self-
    sufficient while still remaining cheaper than Comcast, with
    gigabit speeds.
 
  sigstoat - 3 hours ago
  it's expensive to lay cable through a whole city. digging /
  horizontal drilling aren't cheap, and if you're not the city,
  you've got to deal with the permitting process and accompanying
  hassle.
 
  alexbeloi - 3 hours ago
  This site has some opinions on the
  matter:https://consumerist.com/2014/05/10/why-
  starting-a-competitor...https://consumerist.com/2014/03/07/heres-
  what-lack-of-broadb...
 
  _greim_ - 3 hours ago
  Comcast is in rent-seeking mode at this point; extracting as much
  money as possible from existing infrastructure.By
  "infrastructure" I mean last-mile fiber buried/strung throughout
  neighborhoods and into peoples' homes. It's expensive to build
  such infrastructure, due to varieties of local laws, right-of-way
  access, and for the same reasons leaf nodes are most numerous in
  typical tree data structures.So, Comcast's approach is to extract
  as much money as they can from existing infrastructure which
  they've built, acquired, or gained exclusive rights to, while
  directing minimal resources to building new such.Along with that,
  they expend a lot of effort lobbying to protect that
  infrastructure from encroachment or competition by other
  entities, like other private ISPs, unbundling laws, municipal
  broadband, and the like.
 
peterjmag - 3 hours ago
I'm pretty proud of my hometown for passing this measure! Longmont,
a town 30 miles south of Fort Collins, passed something similar a
couple years ago, and it sounds like it's been pretty successful so
far[1], so I'm excited to see where this goes.[1]
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15570559#up_15573817
 
  FLUX-YOU - 3 hours ago
  Do you happen to know where they hire people for working on this?
  Are they city or state employees, or are they using a bunch of
  contractors?Edit: Hmm, looks like Fort Collins will use
  contractors for installs and hire 10 to 38 people over five years
  (p. 39 - Personnel Requirements): https://www.fcgov.com/broadband
  /pdf/7.27.17%20Broadband%20Bu...However, this is excluding
  developers for things like customer portals. Maybe that will get
  contracted out as well.Seems light to run an ISP, even for FC's
  size.
 
    peterjmag - 3 hours ago
    Good find! I was curious too, and that does seem pretty small.
    I wonder how many people NextLight employs and contracts out in
    Longmont?
 
  _greim_ - 3 hours ago
  Yes, all us front-rangers are envious of you, Longmont :)I'm
  guessing word-of-mouth helped defeat incumbents' efforts to kill
  this, as much as anything. It's almost become a standard
  conversation piece around here: "I'm from Longmont." "Oh, you
  have decent internet, then? Jealous!"
 
  thcipriani - 1 hours ago
  it has indeed been quite successful:
  http://beta.speedtest.net/result/6777148187it's like that all the
  time now. Never been down for longer than 15 minutes and I've
  never been on hold trying to get assistance. All that for $50/mo
  :)
 
  nulagrithom - 2 hours ago
  Some counties in Washington state have a Public Utility District
  which runs the fiber, then sells it through local ISPs. Lots of
  areas have 1Gb connections available for below $100/mo.What's
  more interesting to me is the effect on rural access. Plenty of
  lake-side cabins in the woods with fiber available. One ISP has
  taken to putting up poles with Ubiquiti airFiber antennas,
  creating a mesh network that extends beyond the already large
  fiber coverage. In Chelan and Douglas counties you can get a 35/2
  connection nearly anywhere over this extended wireless network,
  even way up some lonesome canyon.It's amazing what a little
  competition does to the ISP market...
 
matt_wulfeck - 2 hours ago
I love to see cities exert their power. In some ways we?ve
acquiesced to a powerful central government, whether it be federal
or state, but its local governments that should be powerful. After
all, they have the best handle on the needs and desires of their
citizens.
 
  Tasboo - 1 hours ago
  So if some city wants to enact Jim Crow laws, it should be
  allowed to do that without interference from the state or federal
  level?
 
    matt_wulfeck - 24 minutes ago
    Yes, but more specifically if our federal government wants to
    enact "jim-crow" type laws, our state and local governments
    should have the power to say "go fly a kite".
 
    conanbatt - 48 minutes ago
    Yes.
 
WoodenChair - 1 hours ago
We had this in Burlington, VT and now we're selling it off because
the city could not run it effectively (massive debt). Be careful ?
government is usually not a great runner of a customer-service
focused business. Further, do you really want government
(municipal) or otherwise being your ISP? Having access to all of
your traffic lines?
 
  actuallyalys - 1 hours ago
  I'm not sure governments are actually worse than businesses at
  that on average. I've had excellent service at libraries, for
  example. Polls suggest most people have a positive view of
  libraries. [0]I don't see how a local municipality having access
  is worse than a large corporation. At least municipalities aren't
  incentivized to extract more revenue by selling data. It seems
  like regulations and technology are better solutions to privacy
  issues than keeping ISPs private.[0]
  http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/09/09/libraries-2016/
 
  Clubber - 1 hours ago
  All of your points are valid, but let me counter argue.Be careful
  ? government is usually not a great runner of a customer-service
  focused business.Maybe, maybe not, but we know Comcast and TWC
  aren't a great runner of customer-service focused
  business.Further, do you really want government (municipal) or
  otherwise being your ISP? Having access to all of your traffic
  lines?No, but I'm assuming they already have access without a
  warrant now.
 
    WoodenChair - 1 hours ago
    So, you chose the red herrings of the worst possible ISPs.
    There are great commercial ISPs too. What's more important is
    competition, which again is limited by government (government
    decides who gets access to build-out lines).I agree, federal
    government does have the resources to spy, and uses them very
    effectively. Why make it that much easier for our local
    governments to do that as well.
 
      sliverstorm - 53 minutes ago
      What's more important is competitionRight, and that's a key
      ingredient that is missing in Fort Collins. Two main
      providers, who have been operating in typical duopoly
      fashion. I.e. you get one or the other, not both, and even if
      you can get both, the other is no better.
 
      15charlimit - 34 minutes ago
      > There are great commercial ISPs too.Sure, if you're lucky
      enough to live in an area with "actual" competition, which is
      the crux of the entire issue.The vast, vast majority of us
      are stuck with 1 or 2 (if we're lucky) options, both
      relatively shitty, with one being markedly inferior, and both
      absurdly overpriced for the connection you get.
 
[deleted]
 
programmarchy - 3 hours ago
This passed in Boulder county as well, pretty overwhelmingly.
 
  mtnsun - 2 hours ago
  The Fort Collins vote was to allow the city the option to take
  out $150M in municipal bonds for city-wide fiber installation.
  This was pretty much the last voter hurdle before the city moves
  forward.Boulder is still in an earlier phase -- the vote was to
  allow the city to start the planning process.  Greeley also voted
  in favor of something similar.
 
cletus - 2 hours ago
So I'm all for this effort but there are a lot of opinions in this
thread that are (IMHO) too simplistic and ignore history.1.
Building more than one version of given infrastructure is often
called an "overbuild" and it tends to be bad. Like you don't have
two different electric, gas or water companies running a whole set
of wires, poles, pipes or whatever to your house. The capex cost of
any such network is massive so paying that cost 2, 3 or 4 times for
the same number of customers is clearly going to more costly for
consumers overall.2. Utilities, which aren't duplicated, are
heavily regulated to avoid monopolistic behaviour as this is the
only rational choice. I believe in the US this is Title II for
telecommunications at least (which covers landline service). The
FCC under the Obama administration did follow through with a
promise to apply Title II to ISPs as well, something Comcat, TWC
and the like were deadset against as it would obviously impact
profits.The real problem here is that Internet at this point is
really the fourth utility and it should be legislated and regulated
as such but Comcat et al don't just want to be "dumb pipes".This
factors into the whole net neutrality argument too. Imagine PG&E
said that you could only use electricity for Whirlpool branded
washers and dryers or if you used anything else the electricity
would cost you more. Well, that kind of discrimination is what US
ISPs want to be able to do (sadly) and we've already seen this
with, say, Verizon throttling Netflix traffic.3. ISPs have
unfortunately been much better at framing these public debates than
the other side. For example, in the aforementioned net neutrality
debates, ISPs framed this as the likes of Netflix pushing data onto
their network for free and they argued they should get paid for
that.The reality is of course that Netflix doesn't push anything.
Consumers are pulling data from Netflix. ISPs are getting paid for
this too... by the consumers. The ISPs are simply trying to double-
dip and get paid at both ends. What's more, stiffling services like
Netflix has nothing to do with any notion of fairness. It's just a
backhanded way of cable companies propping up their declining TV
businesses.4. Various other models have been tried around the world
to solve the overbuild problem. In Australia, for example, the
government has tried a strategy where a single entity would own the
wires and ISPs could rent those lines to provide services to
consumers. To make this work, the entity owning the wires has to
charge the same price to everyone, no matter how big or
small.Unfortunately, for a bunch of complicated reasons to NBN (so-
called "next generation" broadband network) is going to end up only
guaranteeing 12Mbps to each household... in 2017 for probably
A$60-70B for a country of ~24M.5. Building any sort of netowrk like
this is what I like to call a national hyperlocal business and the
entrenched players are very good at it. To give some examples:-
Getting access to poles varies from city to city and can be hugely
complicated;- Digging trenches can be just as complicated and you
might have to deal with a bunch of different stuff in the ground
(eg one area has a ton of limestone in the soil).- Existing
buildings once had single-vendor agreements that prohibited new
players from providing service there. At one point these were ruled
illegal. They've since been replaced by exclusive marketing
agreements where, say, a condo building will only ever tell you
about one provider.- Once you've built past a lot of houses it
still requires a lot of efforts to connect a new house (we're
talking hours). There is a huge manpower component in this. To be
already connected to an existing provider is a huge advantage to
that existing provider.6. No discussion of cable companies in the
US is complete without touching on the issue of franchise
agreements. A franchise agreement is where a cable company agreed
to build in a given city and to alleviate the expense they were
offered a number of benefits. These could be exclusive rights,
ownership of the poles and so on. But to provide TV service, the
company usually ended up paying the town. These sums could be
significant to the budgets of the towns or counties in which they
applied. These fees also discouraged the municipality from being
friendly to any newcomer as any such newcomer may mean a budget
hit.Disclaimer: I used to work on Google Fiber.
 
  tonycoco - 1 hours ago
  Thanks for this. I needed some sanity.
 
akulbe - 2 hours ago
Cannot heap enough scorn on Comcast. It just seems SO WRONG that
they have so much influence and continue to kill any competition.
 
user-on1 - 3 hours ago
how to encourage other cities to do the same? can colorado guide
the rest of the cities and states to through similar initiatives?
 
  peterjmag - 3 hours ago
  In addition to the other suggestions, it might be worth
  contacting your representative to voice your support of
  legislation to repeal the existing statewide ban. For instance,
  this bill was recently introduced in the state
  senate:https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb17-042That particular
  bill ultimately failed, but it was on the right track.
 
  zanny - 3 hours ago
  If your town / city is less than 10k people simply going to city
  council open forum meetings (most places host those monthly or
  quarterly, some even weekly) and constantly hounding
  representatives about it being a problem with a straightforward
  solution (taxpayer funded public telecom operation in the
  city).Probably the #1 problem is the ignorance of how bad the
  telecom monopoly is in the US, that there even are alternatives,
  and that this is the problem domain government needs to approach
  in the same way they approach electric access or roads.
 
    sigstoat - 3 hours ago
    > Probably the #1 problem is the ignorance of how bad the
    telecom monopoly is in the US, that there even are
    alternatives, and that this is the problem domain government
    needs to approach in the same way they approach electric access
    or roads.amusingly, boulder county, which passed this same
    thing, tried for years to get out of maintaining my
    neighborhood's roads. (and our electric service is privately
    provided.)
 
  kels - 3 hours ago
  I'm in Colorado Springs (2nd largest city in Colorado) and we
  passed this last year although it didn't get any coverage.
  Colorado is definitely moving in the right direction.
 
  excalibur - 3 hours ago
  It sounds like they're working on it. I like that there are a
  number of test cases, which will hopefully lead to a little
  variety in results, and maybe some good ideas regarding which
  techniques are more effective than others. Like any municipal
  service, there will be the potential for it to run smoothly and
  efficiently, and there will be the potential for it to turn into
  a massive clusterfuck and money pit. Where a particular city's
  implementation falls on that spectrum will be determined by their
  own choices.
 
brainbrane - 1 hours ago
Lest we forget iProvo:http://archive.sltrib.com/article.php?id=5628
8307&itype=CMSI...
 
cjsawyer - 3 hours ago
Glad to see that my vote counted!
 
alexasmyths - 2 hours ago
Good idea at this stage - but it would also be very dangerous.In
Canada, in my youth - the entire telelphone network was socialized
- it was a byzantine mess.You had to buy your telephone from the
government (i.e. Bell, state owned).In Saskatchewan, it's still the
same.Imagine if the networks were run like the DMV.Even worse -
with massive, bloated government subsidies and 'guaranteed revenue
stream' through taxation - they can make it impossible to
compete.Pay workers way above market wages (the 'change collectors'
on the Toronto Subway often earn more than $100K a year, even
though the jobs should not even exist anymore).So it's probably a
good idea right now maybe to force some innovation in the sector
...But is there any evidence that American wireless carriers are
operating in an oligarchic manner?Here in Canada - we pay through
the roof for wireless service due to very powerfully entrenched
entities - we envy the US rates, which are relatively
competitive.Anyhow - it's maybe a good move but it needs to be
watched both for successful opportunities (if it works well it
could be a shake up), but also for creeping and bloated
bureaucracy.
 
dchuk - 3 hours ago
I?m failing to think of a single reason why it would ever be
legally acceptable for a government to ban municipal broadband. I
understand the whole corporate shill stuff, I?m speaking literally
from the arguments FOR the ban...how is it justified at all?
 
  menacingly - 2 hours ago
  I felt the same way about prison guard unions lobbying against
  legal recreational weed. Like, what even is a good thing you
  could pretend this is about?
 
    jedberg - 2 hours ago
    Protecting children from harmful drugs.  I'm not saying it does
    that, I'm saying that's the argument to be made.
 
  intopieces - 2 hours ago
  Preface: Whether these fears are reasonable I am not saying
  either way. I am answering your question about how a ban on
  municipal broadband could be justified.Another way to describe
  municipal broadband: state-run media pipeline. Allowing the
  government to control the last mile of the Internet. Port all
  those fears you have about Comcast violating net neutrality,
  stifling competition, spying on users.. Now, increase the power
  from "firm that can put other firms out of business" to "group of
  people who can put other people in jail."
 
    s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
    I think those fears are extremely far-fetched because:1). Don't
    most places that do this set up a company? As in, it's a
    company that happens to have one of it's owners as the city.2).
    Does anyone honestly think that if such a thing were to happen,
    that private ISPs like Comcast would somehow, magically be
    exempt? That the government official would be like a Scooby Doo
    villan, saying, "Curses! I'd have gotten away with the
    censorship and spying if it wasn't for you meddling private
    ISPs!"
 
  jdavis703 - 2 hours ago
  I'm playing Devil's advocate here, but if you believe in a strong
  free-market with a minimal state then you could argue that the
  government should not be providing a service that private
  individuals could provide. Now I think most people are more
  pragmatic and say "whatever get's the job done," but that's the
  reason why some people are against many municipal services,
  including broadband.
 
    kevindqc - 2 hours ago
    As someone else pointed out in the comments, then why not have
    the city put the fiber in the ground, but let private ISPs run
    the network devices and ISP stuff (ie: a bit similar to
    TekSavvy in Canada which uses other ISP's infrastructure - I
    assume they use more than just the fiber though)
 
      sliverstorm - 2 hours ago
      The real free market maniacs, don't want the government
      involved at all, in anything, in any way whatsoever. Private
      streets, private pipes, private prisons, private judiciary
      system, private police...While I think pipes owned by the
      people and leased to private ISPs is a very interesting
      solution, I don't think it would fly with the zero-government
      crowd.
 
        Barrin92 - 1 hours ago
        >I don't think it would fly with the zero-government
        crowwhat I don't understand about these people is that they
        must recognise that comcast essentially functions the same
        way the dreaded government does. They are just as large,
        they are just as organised and powerful. But in contrast to
        the government there is not even a democratic check and
        balance, and an explicit profit motive.I would assume
        someone who likes the 'market' part in 'free market'
        recognises that a single giant corporate entity is not very
        market like at all
 
          tsbertalan - moments ago
          Astroturfing.
 
    borvo - 27 minutes ago
    Where exactly is the "strong free-market" here?
 
    conanbatt - 49 minutes ago
    I dont think the state would be better running broadband, but i
    dont quite see the point of making a law that bans the state
    from doing it.There is a matter of unfair competition, as the
    state can run any service at a loss forever.
 
      tsbertalan - 2 minutes ago
      If it's cheaper and better-quality (which are certainly not
      given), then I don't think you could really call it "unfair".
      At least, in the moral sense, that it would be better for
      society. If the overriding governmental policy goal is indeed
      to maximize the public good, not to maximize shareholder
      value.
 
    carry_bit - 1 hours ago
    For example, why does it have to be government run instead of
    being a consumer co-op?
 
    donatj - 1 hours ago
    Believer in strong free-markets here, and I'm fine with private
    industry competing with the government as long as the
    government entity itself isn't propped up by taxpayers cough
    post office cough amtrak cough.
 
  rayiner - 2 hours ago
  Preface: I think we should have municipal options in places with
  adequate service (as a backstop, because I also think we should
  eliminate build-out obligations that require private companies to
  serve insuffiently profitable subscribers.)That said, municipal
  governments are not sovereign entities, they derive all their
  authority from the state. States get to decide, as a general
  matter, what to make a public service and what to leave to the
  private market. Moreover, municipal governments do lots of stupid
  short sighted things. Remember, they?re the ones who are
  responsible for giving companies monopolies in the first place,
  which Congress had to step in an fix in the Cable Act of
  1994.There is also another matter of politics to consider.
  Municipal services are heavily unionized. Telecom services are
  also pretty heavily unionized, but less so. By shifting telecom
  from a private service into a public one, you?re giving more
  power to public unions. That?s not a good reason to oppose
  municipal broadband, but its undoubtedly a major consideration.
 
    noobermin - 1 hours ago
    The last argument there seems one that would appeal to people
    on the right only who would be against this because it's
    considered "big government" anyway.
 
      rayiner - 55 minutes ago
      The AFSCME (lobbying organization for public employees) is in
      the top 5 for campaign contributors since 1990 and supports
      Democrats almost exclusively. Lots of republicans who aren't
      hardline ideologues oppose expending the influence of public
      employees' unions.
 
jamesaepp - 2 hours ago
Wow they exchanged one monopoly for another monopoly that can use
force. Genius voter population over there.
 
  sounds - 1 hours ago
  State-enforced law to prevent city fiber builds was exchanged for
  city-led coop. Said state-enforced law bought and paid for by
  Comcast, deceptive ad campaign bought and paid for by Comcast,
  and the city still won.Sounds like a classic underdog win to me.
 
  s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
  You'll have to point out where they exchanged monopolies, rather
  than simply set up a competitor to keep the existing monopoly in
  check.
 
  hexane360 - 1 hours ago
  >another monopolyComcast won't cease to exist. Other ISPs can
  form.>that can use forceWhen was the last time your
  water/electric/gas company "used force" against public interest?
 
    conanbatt - 47 minutes ago
    > When was the last time your water/electric/gas company "used
    force" against public interest?Everyday.Think of it this way,
    people that don't want to use the service can't opt out for the
    tax loss incurred by the state running it.
 
      hexane360 - 37 minutes ago
      I don't know about your local utilities, but mine are only
      government regulated, not subsidized.
 
sizzzzlerz - 3 hours ago
Keep your powder dry, Coloradians. COMCAST is like some non-giving
up cable guy who simply won't let citizens determine their own fate
when there is oodles of money to be made from them instead. Prepare
for them to come back through the rear door, bribing the
legislature and congress to enact laws that restrict the practice
just approved.
 
  chungy - 3 hours ago
  Maybe it's just me, but the right thing for Comcast to do is try
  to provide a better product. Competition is healthy, legislation
  is illness.
 
    bllguo - 3 hours ago
    Did you misinterpret? Obviously it's not just you. No consumer
    would be happier if Comcast didn't try to provide a better
    product. The point is that judging by their past actions,
    Comcast won't do that.
 
      peterjmag - 3 hours ago
      They did in Chattanooga, but not before trying to sue the
      city four times:https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/ez
      pk77/chattanoog...A couple shorter articles on the same
      topic:https://www.theverge.com/2015/5/1/8530403/chattanooga-
      comcas...https://consumerist.com/2017/04/11/comcast-
      introduces-gigabi...
 
        s73ver_ - 2 hours ago
        So only after they had exhausted all other options.
 
          superkuh - 2 hours ago
          It's the american way.
 
      dhimes - 3 hours ago
      No, he's agreeing with everybody that Comcast acts shitty
      when they do this.
 
        hoorayimhelping - 3 hours ago
        I think the comment you're replying to understands that. I
        interpreted it as them calling out the fake bravery of
        saying "maybe it's just me" before sharing a very common
        and widely-held opinion.
 
    ssambros - 3 hours ago
    Apparently corporations take the path of least resistance -
    it's cheaper to 'influence' the big state instead of competing
    in an open market. Now the question is: will increasing the
    power of the state make such behavior less or more lucrative?
 
      jjawssd - 3 hours ago
      > will increasing the power of the state make such behavior
      less or more lucrative?More lucrative because the state has a
      monopoly on the legal use of force. Legislation is cheap
      compared to real innovation. Furthermore, legislation is
      backed by the legal system which prevents the cash flow to
      Comcast from decreasing in this case. The legal system is
      fueled by tax money not Comcast's money. Comcast is
      benefiting from an instrument created and paid for by the
      citizenry to create an unfair balance of power in their own
      favor because the legislators which supposedly represent the
      people created the laws which are unjust to the people and
      are no longer representing the people but are instead
      representing their own pocketbook which is being stuffed by
      Comcast. As this trend continues we may experience an influx
      of non traditional political opponents similar to what we saw
      in the national elections one year ago.
 
        hexane360 - 1 hours ago
        If Comcast can hijack our democracy and wield the state's
        power against public interest, then what's to stop it from
        hijacking our democracy to increase the state's power in
        the first place? How does creating a city-owned utility in
        any way change Comcast's lobbying position? Monopolies can
        and do form and persist without government intervention.
        The textbook example of this is utilities.Finally, if
        creating a city-owned utility is beneficial to Comcast, why
        are they vehemently against it?
 
      kfriede - 3 hours ago
      Competing in an open market would mean they actually need to
      be competitive.  Why be competitive when you can shell out
      cash to the vending machine, get guaranteed business, and not
      break a sweat doing it?
 
    criddell - 3 hours ago
    > the right thing for Comcast to doAre you saying that as a
    Comcast shareholder? If so, bravo. I wish more of them thought
    the same way.
 
      jjawssd - 3 hours ago
      A government created by the people for the people must limit
      the influence of corporations on the fabric of society and
      itself. As for-profit corporations necessarily do whatever
      possible to increase shareholder value the only limiting
      factor remains the threat of violence by social mandate. In
      other words The Government. Without this limiting factor we
      will witness an increasing scale of abuses and tragedies of
      the commons in the pursuit of ever-higher shareholder value.
 
        criddell - 3 hours ago
        Don't forget corporations are people too! /s
 
    rayiner - 2 hours ago
    You can?t ?compete? with a municipal service. How many
    competing options do you have for your water or sewer or trash
    pickup? It?s a reasonable argument that broadband should be
    provided municipally. But cloaking it in the guise of
    ?competition? is disingenuous.
 
      com2kid - 2 hours ago
      > You can?t ?compete? with a municipal service.Sure you
      can.The inherent costs to provide services is similar, but
      Comcast can amortize costs over a larger customer base. If
      Comcast is at all competent (a huge if!) then they should
      have overall lower costs, even taking (probably reduced)
      profits into account.Customer service needs to be provided, a
      mailing center to send out hardware, a billing system,
      technicians and installers need to be trained and dispatched,
      payroll for all said employees, and all the other costs of
      running a business that should, in theory, scale to Comcast's
      advantage.And of course Comcast can offer quicker upgrades in
      service. By bringing resources to bear, they should be able
      to iterate on technology faster than a municipal provider
      can.Comcast also has the advantages of bundling services,
      another way to recoup costs and compete vs the municipal
      provided service.A well ran national company with should be
      able to put up one heck of a good free market fight going up
      against a municipality. The real question becomes, is Comcast
      able to put up that fight?
 
        marcoperaza - 25 minutes ago
        Municipal services usually don?t have to turn a profit,
        since they can make up the shortfall with tax revenue.
        You?re missing that crucial point. You can?t effectively
        compete against someone who can operate at a loss in
        perpetuity.I don?t know what the specifics are in this
        case, but if they allow the municipal service to be funded
        by tax revenue, then it?s incredibly unfair.
 
          com2kid - 23 minutes ago
          > Municipal services usually don?t have to turn a profit,
          since they can make up the shortfall with tax revenue.
          You?re missing that crucial point. You can?t effectively
          compete against someone who can operate at a loss in
          perpetuity.This is more of a problem of how things look
          like they are funded.Customers still pay the same price,
          but instead of $60 for Internet service, it may be $50
          for Internet and $10 somewhere else. Or of course the
          city can tax the heck out of one subgroup of people and
          redistribute the funds.I'd actually be OK-ish with a law
          saying that municipal broadband has to be self funded
          after initial rollout, I imagine that would maintain
          sufficient competition.
 
          marcoperaza - 2 minutes ago
          >Customers still pay the same price, but instead of $60
          for Internet service, it may be $50 for Internet and $10
          somewhere else. Or of course the city can tax the heck
          out of one subgroup of people and redistribute the
          funds.No, in your scenario, customers pay $50, and
          EVERYONE pays $10, including those who use a private
          competitor.
 
      TallGuyShort - 2 hours ago
      There's competition in another sense. I'm east of Fort
      Collins where there's a pretty significant anti-government
      streak: but if Comcast manages to suck more than most
      government services they may have a problem.They don't have
      to be the best or even only free-market option: they have to
      avoid pissing off their customer base enough that people vote
      for a municipal option. Not sure they're doing very well at
      that...
 
        efm - 1 hours ago
        You can get gigabit east of Fort Collins:
        http://web.wigginstel.com/service-area/
        http://www.nunntel.com/ Not in Fort Collins, though.
 
          TallGuyShort - 38 minutes ago
          Thanks - didn't know about that! Doesn't cover my area,
          though :)
 
      nsporillo - 2 hours ago
      In the town of West Henrietta, there actually is competition
      for trash pickup as it is not provided by the town or county.
 
        fjjeiu3338 - 2 hours ago
        There is "competition" in my metro area too. They compete
        for city contracts. No one company handles the entire metro
        space.Somehow that all went wrong with ISPs/cable/telco
        serviceSuspect it has something to do with how these
        businesses came up in a period where we were bought in deep
        to corporate overlords having control, whereas garbage is
        pretty old
 
      [deleted]
 
exhilaration - 3 hours ago
Whenever this happens - and it happens a lot - Comcast & Co just
goes up a level to the state legislature and has them outlaw
municipal
broadband:https://www.publicintegrity.org/2014/08/28/15404/how-big-
tel...Can't they just do the same thing in Colorado?
 
  user-on1 - 3 hours ago
  I am sure people in colarado are bold and smart enough to not let
  such back door efforts come in the way of their expectations.
 
    r00fus - 3 hours ago
    I'm sure other people in Colorado would gratefully accept the
    appropriate amount in "campaign funds" to run against those who
    would dare to compete against Comcast.I mean, really - how dare
    they?
 
      user-on1 - 3 hours ago
      I think you mean politicians and corporations. they are not
      really identified as people.This is how the whole world has
      already got ruined. I wish people grow some spine and invest
      enough energy and time and take a stand to get what interests
      them and not become submissive into paying their hard earned
      money to make millionaires billionaire.
 
        r00fus - 1 hours ago
        So I take it you don't agree with Mitt Romney's
        "Corporations are people, my friend".However, the fact is
        that without a rather sweeping change in how we recognize
        and reward incorporation in the US, they are currently
        "more equal" people.
 
  peterjmag - 3 hours ago
  Theoretically, yes. In fact, Senate Bill 152, passed in 2005,
  already outlaws municipal broadband. From the article:Colorado
  has a state law requiring municipalities to hold referendums
  before they can provide cable, telecom, or broadband service.
  Yesterday, voters in Eagle County and Boulder County authorized
  their local governments to build broadband networks, "bringing
  the total number of Colorado counties that have rejected the
  state law to 31?nearly half of the state's 64 counties,"
  Motherboard wrote today.As far as I know, there have been
  attempts to make it impossible for a community to opt-out, but
  nothing's been successful yet. In fact, most recently, it looks
  like the tide has been turning in favor of repealing the ban
  state-wide (which wouldn't be surprising considering the 31
  counties that have already opted out). Here's a bit more
  info:https://co-wa.org/2017/01/26/senate-bill-152-primer/
 
    agumonkey - 2 hours ago
    free market much ...
 
      linsomniac - 2 hours ago
      The situation is that the free market has said "We're going
      to pass on doing this".  So the free market has left the door
      wide open for the government to do it.The free market
      spending a half million dollars trying to keep the government
      from even coming up with a plan for what municipal broadband
      would look like, after not doing it themselves, is hilarious.
 
        agumonkey - 2 hours ago
        of all the mottos the only one that should remain is "lobby
        free"
 
      dfee - 2 hours ago
      While I understand your sentiment, "free market" folk
      generally exclude "government-provided" from that notion.
      This is because those services are often coupled with sector-
      wide regulations that are counter to laissez faire
      principles, the government is able to subsidize operational
      costs against its tax base (unfair competition that distorts
      the market), and other such complexities.
 
        agumonkey - 1 hours ago
        Federal absurd regulations are commie-scandalous while
        lobby absurd regulation are just fine ?It's always the
        same. People don't see, don't control, when they try,
        resistance is so high they will cave before change occurs.
 
          conanbatt - 54 minutes ago
          > Federal absurd regulations are commie-scandalous while
          lobby absurd regulation are just fine ?Laissez fair would
          generally say all regulations are bad. Regulations that
          help monopolies are one of the main reasons free market
          advocates are againt regulations. All regulations start
          with "good intentions".Comcast and phone companies are
          great examples of monopolies that are protected by the
          State, not failures of free market advocates.
 
        muninet - 1 hours ago
        Ah yes, because corporations obviously don?t do any of
        those things (all of which are enabled by governments
        anyway).
 
        greymeister - 1 hours ago
        It depends on whether "government-provided" means that you
        now pay for it whether you wanted the service or not.  If I
        don't pay my cable bill I lose my cable.  If I don't pay my
        taxes...
 
    leesalminen - 1 hours ago
    IIRC, Longmont (a small city in Colorado) already offers
    municipal internet and city wide WiFi.
 
    gigatexal - 3 hours ago
    What a sad, sad world we live in where a corporation can come
    in and use legislation to be obviously anti-competitive. What
    would the world do if comcast or a group of content owners
    tried to sue netflix out of existence because their business
    model threatened the incumbents? There'd be pandemonium.
 
      Florin_Andrei - 2 hours ago
      It's almost as if money in politics is the death of ethics.
      Almost.
 
      StreamBright - 2 hours ago
      You mean country. This sort of out of control capitalism does
      not happen everywhere.
 
      jdavis703 - 2 hours ago
      > What a sad, sad world we live in where a corporation can
      come in and use legislation to be obviously anti-
      competitiveThis is always a risk with any government. The
      problem is voters keep voting for these same people passing
      these laws (or worse yet, don't even vote claiming "nothing
      will change anyways."
 
        sbov - 2 hours ago
        The problem is that most of the time, the person with the
        most money wins.
 
      JoshTriplett - 2 hours ago
      > What a sad, sad world we live in where a corporation can
      come in and use legislation to be obviously anti-
      competitive.If we actually had reasonable competition among
      local broadband (e.g. everyone in the country had a choice of
      at least 2-3 reasonable options, and DSL does not count as
      "reasonable" anymore), then I'd actually call the
      introduction of a government-backed option "anti-
      competitive", because how can any private ISP compete with
      that? A government-run ISP gives itself inherent anti-
      competitive boosts that it doesn't give anyone else.However,
      in the world we have, where many people don't have enough
      reasonable choices to allow for actual competition among
      ISPs, municipal broadband seems like a perfectly reasonable
      response. In which case, rather than attempting to quash it,
      I'd rather see communities lay the fiber and then allow
      private ISPs to be the ones to light it up and provide
      bandwidth from the nearest meet-me room.
 
        subroutine - 2 hours ago
        > how can any private ISP compete with that?Offer faster
        speeds and more reliable connections (compared what might
        be a very congested public network), at reasonable prices.
 
          rayiner - 2 hours ago
          That assumes there are enough people who care about
          quality of service over price to make a private
          alternative tenable. There is a reason why there is no
          private competition to municipal bus systems, even really
          terrible ones.
 
          subroutine - 1 hours ago
          Sure there is competition for the municipal bus system -
          taxis and ride share services. It's almost the perfect
          metaphor. For those who want faster service they look for
          options that offer these things at a reasonable price,
          and for those who don't care about fast speeds or cannot
          otherwise afford or justify the cost use the lowest
          common denominator, which is the public provided system.
          However, with internet service, there is no fallback.
 
          lovich - 1 hours ago
          There are totally private competitors to the private bus
          system, and there is private health insurance in places
          like the UK with social healthcare. I understand your
          point but I can't think of a single industry that doesn't
          have a natural monopoly where there wouldn't be room for
          two competitors based on differentiating solely on price
 
        lisper - 2 hours ago
        > how can any private ISP compete with that?If the answer
        to your rhetorical question is supposed to be "they can't"
        then government-provided broadband is manifestly superior
        to anything the private sector can provide.  Why would we
        as a society not want that?
 
          JoshTriplett - 2 hours ago
          It's not necessarily superior; it's subsidized and
          doesn't have to actually make money, or even break even.
          Ultimately its costs can be hidden away in taxes or debt,
          where they're still present but unseen. Municipal
          broadband also often gets fast-tracked or special-cased
          in regulation; governments don't do a good job of
          regulating themselves.Private ISPs can't do any of those
          things; they actually have to pay for infrastructure,
          follow regulations in installation, etc.Personally, I'd
          prefer to see either community-run pseudo-ISPs ("we laid
          some fiber and contracted for bandwidth"), or fiber made
          available as infrastructure but the bandwidth handled via
          the market (much easier to have healthy competition).
 
          vidarh - 1 hours ago
          Historically, most places with government owned telco's
          starting ISPs still had arms length regulation. If that
          was really the concern, looking at the dozens of
          countries with experience in regulating this would be
          rather simple.That said, I agree that you'd get far just
          by providing the last mile. In the EU, deregulation
          basically required the owners of monopoly last mile
          infrastructure to separate them out into separate
          business units that are heavily regulated to provide
          equal service. Nothing prevents providers from choosing
          to build their own, but this ensures "anyone" can start
          an ISP.E.g. in the UK, BT separated out OpenReach - not
          only are they restricted to offering same service and
          prices to everyone, their wholesale prices are published
          on their web pages for everyone to see.There are still
          problems - e.g. BT is often accused of milking OpenReach
          rather than investing in the network. But those problems
          could have been solved by regulating profit-taking so
          that profits can only be taken as a proportion of
          investment.OpenReach offer both local-loop-unbundling
          (IPSs put equipment in BT exchanges and handle backhaul
          themselves, and get a raw copper or fibre connection to
          the subscriber) and backhaul where ISPs connect to BT one
          or more places and get a raw IP connection to the
          subscriber.It works ok, with the caveat above, and it
          also doesn't stop alternatives, like FTTP from other
          providers, in areas where it is economically viable to
          lay new networks.
 
          rayiner - 44 minutes ago
          European unbundling rules mostly don't apply to cable or
          fiber, which are the dominant modes of broadband access
          in the U.S.: http://www.oecd.org/sti/broadband/2-7.pdf.>
          There are still problems - e.g. BT is often accused of
          milking OpenReach rather than investing in the
          network.The caveat is perhaps the opposite of what you
          suggest. Unbundling works okay in the U.K. because BT
          OpenReach has been allowed to be quite profitable. (Their
          profits as a percentage of revenue are between TWC and
          Comcast.) Unbundling in the U.S. failed, in contrast,
          because the FCC set wholesale rates so low there was
          basically no incentive to invest in DSL networks.It's my
          theory that stuff that works in other countries fails in
          the U.S. because everyone is so ideological. In the U.K.,
          the privatization of BT was preceded by tons of economic
          studies analyzing how to balance broadband availability
          and price against the need to make investing in broadband
          a profitable endeavor. In the U.S. it's entirely
          ideological. Pro-business free marketers on one side
          versus people who see broadband as a social justice
          issue, economics be damned. We lurch form one mode to the
          other based on who happens to be in power.
 
          deusofnull - moments ago
          So yr ideal example is kinda like public roads (fiber)
          and private trucking (bandwidth).  I think that's a neat
          solution tbh. Especially if the bandwidth suppliers are
          properly taxed for use of the public fiber, tax revenue
          which then could be used to maintain and expand the fiber
          infrastructure.
 
        asabjorn - 1 hours ago
        >  I'd rather see communities lay the fiber and then allow
        private ISPs to be the ones to light it up and provide
        bandwidth from the nearest meet-me room.What is the value
        of that? Wouldn't that be effectively privatizing the gains
        and socializing the cost?I believe internet is a utility,
        and it would be great to see it regulated as such including
        service level and price.
 
          JoshTriplett - 1 hours ago
          > What is the value of that? Wouldn't that be effectively
          privatizing the gains and socializing the cost?No, it
          would be having the government provide the infrastructure
          that we only need one of (fiber to individual homes),
          while encouraging competition among service providers,
          rather than stagnation with a single monopoly.
 
          asabjorn - 1 hours ago
          What extra value would those service providers provide? I
          assume here that the service level would be Gbit internet
          with service levels as high as electricity, which is also
          a utility monopoly at least here in SF.
 
        krisdol - 2 hours ago
        You can't simultaneously advocate for superior free-market
        solutions and then complain when the government outcompetes
        the private sector.
 
          SaltyBackendGuy - 17 minutes ago
          It it really a free market though..."in which the laws
          and forces of supply and demand are free from any
          intervention by a government, price-setting monopoly, or
          other authority."It would be awesome if we actually had a
          choice of provider, however you're generally limited to
          whatever ISP's 'turf' you fall
          into.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_marketEDIT: I
          just reread you comment and you're not claiming it's a
          free market 
 
          JoshTriplett - 2 hours ago
          I can when the government gives itself advantages that it
          doesn't give the private sector, like subsidies, taxes
          (paid whether you use the service or not), and regulatory
          exceptions.
 
          moosey - 1 hours ago
          You continually assert that subsidies, lowered taxes, and
          regulatory exceptions haven't been regularly given to
          these companies.  I would assert instead that it isn't
          difficult to find the opposite, and that all too often
          that money is used to further profit margins.
 
          JoshTriplett - 1 hours ago
          And I would argue against those too, consistently.
 
          moosey - 29 minutes ago
          Alright, but you've missed the point.  These companies
          have had the opportunity to make a superior product with
          the same allowances that you suggest that municipal would
          get.  But they didn't.Alternatively, I would argue that a
          municipal system is, in fact, fair competition.  If a
          municipality decides that they, collectively, want to
          create and pay for a service due to lack of quality
          competition, then it is their right to do so.  This has
          so far proven extremely effective, as even private
          services have improved in quality and price when it
          happens.This is a win/win for the consumer.  For me, they
          are the more important part of the equation.
 
          pgeorgi - 1 hours ago
          > subsidies, [?] regulatory exceptionsAmazon just had a
          big contest on subsidies and the only exceptional thing
          about it was how brazen they were about it. Regulatory
          exceptions often are part of such deals.> taxes (paid
          whether you use the service or not)Monopolists call that
          "bundling". For example co-financing internet service by
          requiring you also pay for phone service.The main
          difference is that a public service doesn't need to have
          profit maximizing as its primary goal.
 
          muninet - 1 hours ago
          You do realize that a) corporate welfare is egregiously
          prevelant in the United States and b) the ?government?
          isn?t a single entity, right? If a democratically elected
          (roughly) assembly, e.g. people with a ballot measure, a
          city council, a state legislature, etc. decide that
          municipal internet is better for society and provided as
          a government service, that is absolutely that body?s
          right. Government doesn?t exist to outcompete the private
          sector. Government is not just another Amazon or Google
          or Walmart (ideally; in practice it kind of is). It?s
          there to provide stability, basic services, justice, and
          an overall formal structure so civilized society can
          exist. If fiber is one of those services, and that?s the
          will of the people, then so be it.
 
        kevin_thibedeau - 12 minutes ago
        They don't have to be the ISP. Instead implementing a
        system like DSL was supposed to have with competition
        between CLECs on the same last mile infrastructure.
 
  oh_sigh - 3 hours ago
  muni broadband already has an established history in colarado -
  for example nextlight by Longmont, CO
 
  [deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
jjuel - 2 hours ago
I lived in a city with muni owned cable and broadband. It was
amazing. Great service and reasonably priced. Even offering gig
internet. I miss those days now where Spectrum is one of my only
options.
 
evadne - 2 hours ago
See also:Kushnick, B., $300 Billion Broadband Scandal [2009]
http://www.teletruth.org/docs/broadbandscandalfree.pdf
 
cavisne - 2 hours ago
Has any city / company tried to build such a network since docsis
3.1 became available? Google seems to have basically given up. This
will likely be a disaster for any city that tries, Comcast will
just undercut them with higher speeds than any consumer will notice
a difference. And taxpayers will be left with a huge bill.
 
  sounds - 1 hours ago
  DOCSIS 3.1 is impressive, but it's really the HFC infrastructure
  that even remotely threatens a FTTx build.The comments far and
  wide (except as Ajit sees fit to hide) show a new carrier could
  not even be competitive at DOCSIS 3.1 levels, and still
  win.Comcast has found such impressive execration that the "speed
  wars" only matter a little bit. It's just that Comcast has
  neglected their networks for so long that even at the most basic
  level, i.e. speeds, they regularly fail the previous
  administration's metric for "high speed internet" at peak times
  -- you know, the times when people actually use their internet.