GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-06) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Rivals Intel and AMD Team Up on PC Chips to Battle Nvidia
263 points by MekaiGS
https://www.wsj.com/articles/rivals-intel-and-amd-team-up-on-pc-...
___________________________________________________________________
 
nailer - 6 hours ago
Why doesn't NVIDIA build a CPU? They'd have to license x86 from
Intel/AMD (since most Windows apps are built for x64) but AFAIK
CPUs are far less complex (in sheer amount of transistors) than
GPUs.
 
  littlecranky67 - 6 hours ago
  Because x86 is a patent minefield, AMD has a license but other
  companies would have to negotioate with Intel about those patents
  before they can do x86.
 
    lawl - 58 minutes ago
    And then AMD for x64.
 
  dpark - 6 hours ago
  Fewer transistors doesn't mean less complex.If it were easy to
  build a CPU competitive with Intel, AMD would do it more
  consistently.
 
  pjmlp - 6 hours ago
  They do, ARM based ones.
 
    muxr - 1 hours ago
    It's important to note their ARM CPUs aren't anything to write
    home about. Mostly a slightly modified version of ARM's own
    reference designs.
 
  grogenaut - 6 hours ago
  So the way I understand it is gpus are really just a lot of
  really dumb CPUs and they toss out all but the simplest
  interlocking. So Nvidia gets to skip a lot of legacy complexity
  and focus on building chips that just have lots of copies of the
  same thing. The complexity is pushed downstream. Stuff also has
  to be rewritten for gpus. And this is for people chasing speed so
  they're more likely to rewrite. These people couldn't do what
  they wanted without this new tech.CPUs need to make legacy code
  up to 40 years old run faster so there is a ton of complexity in
  the hardware. They are chasing people who want modest speed bumps
  without large changes.Kinda like how apple was able to pull off a
  performant phone/tablet after Microsoft failed a bunch... Because
  they got people to rewrite apps (or create) for their platform
  instead of shoehorning windows apps into a different form factor.
  Much bloat was cut, usability was redone. It's an analogy so
  don't go silly over the differences.
 
shmerl - 6 hours ago
Is this really going to be Intel with AMD GPU, or Intel simply
paying to AMD for patents instead of Nvidia, while still making
their own GPU?Somehow I doubt, AMD want to give away their APU
competitive advantage to Intel.
 
  mastax - 4 hours ago
  https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/11/intel-will-ship-
  proc...AMD GPU Die + Intel CPU die on one package.
 
    shmerl - 4 hours ago
    Interesting. Given it's Intel and AMD, I hope it will work
    seamlessly on Linux, unlike the Optimus horror.
 
      SXX - 2 hours ago
      PRIME offloading on laptops with same combination worked
      flawlessly for years. Its obviously work on desktop as well
      between GPUs with open source drivers.
 
        shmerl - 1 hours ago
        Not on combination of Intel + Nvidia though.
 
martin1975 - 1 hours ago
Great news. The only way we will see progress w/OpenGL, and
eventually Vulkan, as well as Wayland and its litany of Wayland
enabled compositors is with open source drivers.Intel and AMD seems
to have seen the light of Linux. I wonder who's next - Microsoft
perhaps ditching Windows for Linux and building a super GUI on top
of Linux to make it an OS X killer?
 
neurotech1 - 7 hours ago
Non-Paywall link http://archive.is/X3vJN
 
nerpderp83 - 5 hours ago
Ok, I haven't read the article, on mobile... But Intel and AMD
shouldn't be aligning on anything. This sounds extremely anti-
competstive.Nvidia should get an automatic x86 license.Actually, I
have a proactive anti monopoly idea. Any company that is the
predominant player in a market cannot use patents to limit the
ability of a competitor to make a compatible product.This would
mean anyone could make x86 chips w/o a license.
 
  ac29 - 2 hours ago
  There are rumours and speculation about this, but my reading into
  it is that this is going to be a single SKU (maybe 2 or 3
  variants), possibly for a single customer.My best guess is Apple
  -- they were already using Intel CPUs with AMD GPUs, and they
  probably opened up their checkbook to make this collaboration
  happen. It should give them performance and power benefits, and
  Intel and AMD sell the same number of CPUs and GPUs,
  respectively, as before.Not sure why you think this is so anti-
  competitive. Who knows if NVIDIA was offered the same deal and
  declined? They are much less prone to making "semi-custom" parts
  for third parties, while AMD already has a track record of doing
  this for Sony with the PS4 and Microsoft for the Xbox One.
 
  0xJRS - 4 hours ago
  Couldn't they just create a small company with 1 "employee" and
  patent everything under that company and just "share" their
  secrets?
 
    nerpderp83 - 4 hours ago
    That should be treated like an SEC violation. Life is not a
    rulebook to be gamed.  Those that manipulate the law should be
    shown the door.
 
  muxr - 1 hours ago
  The reason why Intel has iGPUs in their CPUs in the first place
  is a result of Intel licensing Nvidia tech. So you're telling me
  after Intel has paid Nvidia billions to use their tech, now it
  should be illegal for AMD to get in bed with Intel?Source:
  https://newsroom.intel.com/news-releases/intel-announces-
  new...Good luck with that argument.
 
  tasty_freeze - 3 hours ago
  Define "predominant in a market."  Is intel competing in the x86
  market, or the computing market?  Intel could rightly point out
  that vastly more ARM cores are sold than x86 cores, so really it
  should be open season on ARM, not Intel.
 
johnvega - 6 hours ago
For those who are excited about AR/VR Mixed Reality headsets that
Microsoft recently released, I think being able to use them with
more laptops or maybe even thin and light laptops will be a great
option. If you haven't tried the floating 2D desktop inside a 3D VR
of the computer you're using is an interesting experience.
 
phkahler - 8 hours ago
It seems risky for AMD to hand over graphics tech in any form other
than die or masks. Is it possible they're just going to use Intel
as a foundry for Raven Ridge or perhaps a next-gen Ryzen? Even that
doesn't make sense. Intel would probably prefer high profit chips
be made by them rather than GF just to keep the competition behind.
But from an AMD point of view, they want competition at the
advanced nodes.Still head scratching on this one...
 
floatboth - 8 hours ago
Oh, so still not confirmed officially.Why would AMD agree to this?
This would massively eat into Raven Ridge laptop sales.
 
  zanny - 6 hours ago
  Considering how successful in the laptop space AMD has been for
  the last... decade, I don't think they have much market share to
  lose here.Laptops have always been the most profound
  demonstration of Intels monopoly because they are tightly
  integrated products that end users never get to customize deeply.
  So its really easy for Intel to just "persuade" notebook vendors
  to only put AMD chips in garbage models, if at all.
 
  mmrezaie - 8 hours ago
  Probably next Apple release cycle is the main motivation, but who
  knows?
 
    mtgx - 8 hours ago
    I'm actually quite surprised Apple didn't go with
    Ryzen/Threadripper already in their Mac Pros, considering what
    a huge multi-thousand dollar margins that would have offered
    them (at least if they went with the same absurd prices as the
    Xeon Mac Pros). And they could've still claimed a significant
    boost for their Mac Pro performance compared to the old Intel
    chip in the last generation.They could've also replaced all of
    their dual-core laptops with quad-core Ryzen APUs for about
    2-2.5x increase in both CPU multi-thread performance and GPU
    performance. And I don't think it would've cost them more, or
    not significantly more at least. AMD seems to price their cores
    at 50-60% of Intel's cores.
 
      pault - 7 hours ago
      Isn't thickness and therefore heat dissipation and power
      consumption paramount in Apple's laptop line? AMD struggles
      in all those areas as far as I know.
 
        mtgx - 5 hours ago
        AMD's latest chips and APUs are more efficient than
        Intel's. You should do a hard reset on everything you know
        about AMD's chips that is older than a year.
 
        mark-r - 6 hours ago
        I thought Ryzen was finally catching up in those areas?
        They certainly seem to be competitive in the desktop space.
 
      mmrezaie - 7 hours ago
      I would have liked to see that too but I assume one of the
      reasons can be porting the BIOS/UEFI and Chipset Drivers, and
      keep the quality the same as the one that they have already.
      AMD has done good on the hardware but they are not famous for
      being stable on the driver and software side.
 
      bluGill - 5 hours ago
      I would guess that Apple/Intel have a multi-year contract in
      place. Apple probably has a legal obligation to keep using
      Intel for the next couple years. There are many benefits that
      to both sides that can be put into a contract - different for
      each case.
 
  [deleted]
 
dna_polymerase - 8 hours ago
AMD should focus on getting great support for their existing tech.
If their current GPU lineup would be better supported by Tensorflow
& the likes that would greatly increase their adoption. Also, more
RAM per GPU guys. Memory is a big bottleneck for many models I use.
 
  dman - 8 hours ago
  Check out the Radeon ssg. Its a gpu with a directly addressable
  2tb ssd built into the gpu.
 
Lramseyer - 23 minutes ago
This is fantastic for AMD! Intel has the largest market share for
GPUs with integrated graphics. While I haven't looked into it too
much, it sounds like an opportunity for Intel's market share on top
of what they already have. Let's just hope that Intel doesn't pull
any legal tomfoolery and steal AMD's IP.
 
habeebtc - 2 hours ago
So, this might seem like strange bedfellows, but recall that AMD
and Intel are both competitors and each other's customers.AMD
licenses x86 from Intel, and Intel licenses x64 from AMD (because
Itanium failed to win the 64 bit market).
 
quickben - 8 hours ago
And the stock goes wild in exactly 10m on market opening.
 
  skinnymuch - 8 hours ago
  AMD has a decent bump of being up over 6% so far today (markets
  open for 15 min). I was going to go in but read this news too
  late. Amd is too volatile and random to her short term they'll go
  up more than the current 6% bump.
 
bitL - 8 hours ago
Intel + AMD should get together in offering a CUDA
alternative/compatibility for Deep (Reinforcement) Learning/AI
where NVidia is experiencing exponential growth for the past few
years and they are simply non-existing there full of half-baked
efforts.
 
  ensiferum - 7 hours ago
  They could leverage OpenCL and they both already have
  implementations.
 
    pjmlp - 7 hours ago
    Then they better provide SysCL and sys backends to modern
    languages.
 
  nl - 30 minutes ago
  AMD doesn't care about Deep Learning.This is a quote:"Are we
  afraid of our competitors? No, we're completely unafraid of our
  competitors," said Taylor. "For the most part, because?in the
  case of Nvidia?they don't appear to care that much about VR. And
  in the case of the dollars spent on R&D, they seem to be very
  happy doing stuff in the car industry, and long may that
  continue?good luck to them. We're spending our dollars in the
  areas we're focused on.""Car stuff" being self-driving cars,
  while "the areas we're focused on" is VR. From
  http://arstechnica.co.uk/gadgets/2016/04/amd-focusing-on-
  vr-...AMD has made numerous press releases about supporting deep
  learning, sometimes via OpenCL, sometimes via cross compiling
  CUDA or sometimes something else.I used to get excited about
  it.Now, I have a rule: don't get excited about AMD (or Intel, or
  any new hardware) until they are winning at training neural
  networks on an absolute speed basis. (Note: vendors will
  frequently release benchmarks showing how they beat Nvidia.
  Almost inevitably these are for inference, and often on a speed
  per watt or speed per dollar, or you can't actually buy the
  hardware.)
 
  pjmlp - 7 hours ago
  This is the whole point, CUDA only got this far, because OpenCL
  sucks forcing everyone to use a C dialect.They had to be beaten
  to finally start proving a bytecode format similar to PTX, for
  multiple languages, while accepting that most researchers want to
  use C++ or migrate their Fortran code into GPUs.
 
    zanny - 6 hours ago
    OpenCL 2.1 was released two years ago and introduced a C++
    version of the kernel language.
 
      dragontamer - 4 hours ago
      AMD only supports OpenCL 2.0 today.So practically speaking,
      OpenCL 2.0 is the best you can get, unless you want to run on
      Intel's iGPUs or Intel's AVX 512 on their CPUs.AMD does have
      support of C++ in OpenCL 1.2 as an optional extension, but
      their support of C++ in OpenCL 1.2 doesn't work when you
      enable OpenCL 2.0 for some reason. Also, the CodeXL debugger
      only works on OpenCL 1.2 at the moment...As far as I can
      tell, AMD's implementation of OpenCL 2.0 is still early
      stage. Its fine if you're cool with debugging with "printf"
      statements.
 
      pjmlp - 5 hours ago
      I know, most of the drivers still don't support it properly
      after two years, and there are no good debuggers
      available.Meanwhile on the CUDA C++ side,"Designing (New) C++
      Hardware? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86seb-iZCnI
 
  abiox - 7 hours ago
  > a CUDA alternativethis is what OpenCL is, afaik.
 
    bitL - 7 hours ago
    ...a very underwhelming one when it comes to Deep Learning
 
      ginko - 7 hours ago
      Well mainly because Nvidia gimped their OpenCL drivers and
      there was no customer pushback.
 
        pjmlp - 6 hours ago
        OpenCL vendors never provided a competing tooling
        alternative to CUDA.Drivers are only part of the story.Even
        Google preferred to create their own Renderscript dialect
        than supporting OpenCL.
 
        bitL - 6 hours ago
        That would still be fine if OpenCL was similarly-performing
        on Intel/AMD and a 1st class citizen of various Deep
        Learning frameworks. OpenCL is just an afterthought there
        sadly.
 
  microcolonel - 8 hours ago
  AMD and Google IIRC are already working on a CUDA implementation
  for AMD GPUs.
 
    DannyBee - 7 hours ago
    Google open sourced CUDA support for Clang/LLVM, which has been
    upstream a while now (years) and is kept up to date with
    various CUDA versions.  This has not been a collaboration with
    AMD.I haven't kept up to date on what AMD has done with that
    work, but i believe they use it as part of their compatibility
    story.
 
    bitL - 8 hours ago
    How much do I need to wait until TensorFlow can run stable and
    at the same speed as on cuDNN on AMD hardware? I can't even
    contemplate buying AMD right now (gaming is not very important
    to me).
 
      jdietrich - 7 hours ago
      AMD's performance deficit is about to get a lot worse.
      Nvidia's upcoming Volta architecture is massively optimised
      for deep learning - they're touting a 12x performance
      increase for training and 6x for inferencing over Pascal.I
      think Intel have a better chance of catching up with Nvidia
      at this stage. They've been on an acquisition spree and have
      picked up a huge amount of DL-related IP. They have immense
      R&D and fab resources at their disposal.https://wccftech.com
      /nvidia-volta-tesla-v100-gpu-compute-ben...
 
        dragontamer - 4 hours ago
        That's only if you use Volta's Tensor cores however.AMD's
        16-bit packed performance with Vega is more than
        respectable vs NVidia's 16-bit packed performance in
        Pascal.In the future, all AMD needs to catch up to Volta's
        Tensor cores is to build Tensor cores themselves. That
        doesn't seem like a major technical hurdle. I'm fairly
        certain that Google would be the primary patent holder on
        Tensor-cores.
 
  gigatexal - 7 hours ago
  This. CUDA gives Nvidia a huge advantage
 
  dave_sullivan - 7 hours ago
  Intel and AMD had the opportunity in 2014 but they made a series
  of bad decisions that has put them waaaay far behind. Nervana was
  a bad move for intel and they've figured it out by now. AMD is
  deeply mismanaged and shareholders should lobby for change.
  OpenCL has been such a missed opportunity.Nvidia will be hard to
  beat; they're going to be the next Intel.
 
bryanlarsen - 8 hours ago
Much better source:  https://newsroom.intel.com/editorials/new-
intel-core-process...credit to trynumber9:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15635771
 
tombert - 8 hours ago
I'm not super familiar with the law in this area, but doesn't
AMD+Intel teaming up get into antitrust territory?  The x86
architecture still basically has a monopoly on the desktop, laptop,
and server space. Could someone a bit more familiar in this area
elaborate?
 
  simion314 - 8 hours ago
  I think this would be Intel+Radeon division  and not the AMD
  CPUs, Intel would still compete with the AMD CPU division
 
  [deleted]
 
  muxr - 1 hours ago
  Intel has paid Nvidia billions in the past to use Nvidia's tech
  at the expense of AMD..https://newsroom.intel.com/news-releases
  /intel-announces-new...Since both Nvidia and Intel are monopolies
  in their respective fields.. that was far more egregious towards
  AMD than this is towards Nvidia.
 
  convery - 8 hours ago
  Not a lawyer, but: in theory; yes. However, we don't really deal
  with anti-trust issues anymore as any reasonable fine is pocket-
  change for these companies. Not to mention that if there's a
  legitimate threat they just fund a startup and point to it as
  independent competition that will go bankrupt the second people
  stops talking about the anti-trust.
 
m3kw9 - 8 hours ago
This prove how dominant Nvidia is, Intel and AMD is literally
shaking in their boots to even consider partnering up to attempt to
defeat a common enemy
 
  pklausler - 5 hours ago
  "Literally"?  Are you sure that's the right word here?
 
  addicted - 7 hours ago
  More likely it proves how financially weak AMD is.
 
  sclangdon - 7 hours ago
  Is Nvidia that dominant? I don't have any numbers, but I'd be
  surprised if they had more GFX cards installed than Intel. In the
  high-end market, sure, but that's not a very big part of the
  whole story.And as for game consoles, both Xbox One and PS4 uses
  an AMD. Only the Switch uses NVidia.
 
    friedman23 - 7 hours ago
    Comparing dedicated graphics cards to integrated graphics and
    then claiming intel has more chips installed than Nvidia is
    asinine.
 
    throwaway2048 - 1 hours ago
    there is nobody paying $500+ for an intel GPU, or more like
    $5000+ in the pro market.
 
nicktelford - 9 hours ago
I honestly can't see this going anywhere; Intel have no skin in the
discrete graphics game, so what do they have to gain from this?
They're not really competing with nVIDIA, except perhaps in the
emerging AI hardware market?
 
  marcofatica - 7 hours ago
  Intel would've been wiped out in this segment by AMD. only choice
  to survive
 
  quickben - 8 hours ago
  Preventing obliteration in the ultra thin laptop segment.
 
  HelloNurse - 7 hours ago
  "Our collaboration with Intel expands the installed base for AMD
  Radeon GPUs and brings to market a differentiated solution for
  high-performance graphics".Intel wants/needs better GPUs than
  their own ones for their laptop offers, a fairly impressive
  admission of incompetence, and (as others noted) AMD lacks laptop
  CPUs and wants to sell more laptop graphics solutions, which are
  supposed to be their specialty.  Good products can be expected,
  but I suspect Intel might strike a similar deal with Nvidia:
  whatever thin laptop the public buys, it's going to have a Intel
  CPU.
 
  mtgx - 9 hours ago
  Intel has already displaced Nvidia in most laptops because its
  integrated graphics got "good enough". Some OEMs continue to add
  low-end Nvidia graphics to Intel-based laptops, even though they
  have the same or less performance than Intel's graphics, simply
  because they don't want Intel to think they are their exclusive
  supplier and can raise prices at will.What this deal will do is
  allow Intel to become the de-facto leader in the growing "laptop
  gaming" market, displacing both Nvidia and AMD from that market.
  AMD had a chance to dominate that market now with multi-core
  Ryzen CPUs and its dedicated GPUs, but it seems they've just
  decided to hand that market over to Intel on a silver
  platter.Such a huge mistake from AMD. This is why I would rather
  AMD would be acquired by someone like Samsung or Broadcom to give
  AMD the money it needs than do stupid deals like this one with
  Intel because it's so strapped for cash.
 
    com2kid - 3 hours ago
    > Some OEMs continue to add low-end Nvidia graphics to Intel-
    based laptops, even though they have the same or less
    performance than Intel's graphicshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?
    v=h0MeI0sQfy4https://www.notebookcheck.net/Mobile-Graphics-
    Cards-Benchmar...Intel's highest end can't meet Nvidia's lowest
    end embedded, which can be had at a very affordable price.
 
    paulmd - 4 hours ago
    >  Some OEMs continue to add low-end Nvidia graphics to Intel-
    based laptops, even though they have the same or less
    performance than Intel's graphicsThe only competitive part from
    Intel is Iris Pro 580 with the Crystal Well cache, and those
    parts are capital-E expensive.
 
    bitL - 8 hours ago
    I guess AMD is betting on EPYC; desktop is not progressing much
    and they are non-existing on laptops either, possibly blocked
    by Intel on the vendor level, so it's better for them to get a
    few % of profit instead of none from this segment.
 
      lettergram - 8 hours ago
      Exactly my thoughts. I posted in a comment below (also
      responding to mtgx). Essentially, the laptop chips AMD can
      produce are still slightly better (well, cheaper) - it's just
      they can't get into the market for a few years until vendors
      are up again.
 
  [deleted]
 
mtgx - 9 hours ago
This will probably go down as AMD's biggest strategic mistake in
the past decade (other than the Bulldozer architecture).Did they at
least revise their licensing deal where Intel basically adds a
requirement that AMD can't be sold to other companies? If not, then
AMD's leadership must be clueless. They should've revised that
clause the first chance they got to make another deal (like this
one!) with Intel.
 
  lettergram - 8 hours ago
  I can't imagine they would do this without a new licensing deal.
  Essentially, they are handing over their APU technology. I still
  think their ryzen chips are likely cheaper to produce and equally
  performant to Intel's. So overall they are still a solid
  option.This just helps them make inroads with Intel who already
  locked up much of the laptop market. I'm pretty convinced there
  was no way AMD could enter that market for a few years in any
  meaningful way regardless.
 
    littlecranky67 - 5 hours ago
    As far as some sources report, AMD will be shipping Dies to
    Intel so the IP of the GPUs is not revealed. I also think that
    we will hear that AMD gets to use some patents/Intel technology
    over the deal (such as AVX512).
 
  agumonkey - 8 hours ago
  Depends how long
 
  jjawssd - 8 hours ago
  As a "strategic mistake" counter-argument: It is possible that
  AMD would go under without this deal.
 
    DoofusOfDeath - 8 hours ago
    Leading AMD must be emotionally exhausting.  Can you image
    leading a company that for so long is fighting for survival?
 
      krylon - 8 hours ago
      Given the entangled licensing situation, what would happen to
      Intel if AMD went bankrupt? Would they not lose their x86_64
      license, unless they bought what remained of AMD? And if they
      did, would that raise some major antitrust issues?
 
        Macha - 26 minutes ago
        Depends on the license terms. e.g. if their license
        agreement says its irrevocable or "irrevocable unless         action that blatantly violates the spirit of the
        contract>", then a future AMD buyer would not be able to
        retract the license just because they think they could get
        a better deal now. I'd imagine Intel's lawyers are good
        enough to get such a deal.
 
      manigandham - 8 hours ago
      This is basically every startup. Many of the quiet successes
      take decades.
 
        qeternity - 8 hours ago
        This is most businesses in general where healthy and
        creatively destructive competition takes place.
 
    infogulch - 7 hours ago
    Is that reasonable though? I thought AMD was doing great with
    Ryzen and Epyc, and Vega is selling out as much as they can
    make.
 
ksec - 8 hours ago
This is like, "Hell has frozen over" kind of newsAm I the only one
who smell this as very "Apple" wanted?I dont think AMD will be
giving up any GFX secret, more likely this is AMD shipping Intel a
Mobile Gfx Die to be integrated within the same CPU package.But in
any case, Why not just have Intel ship a Mobile CPU without iGPU
and a Separate GPU.And AMD, why now? When Zen is doing great, has
great roadmap and potential, along with much better GFx then Intel.
Why?Edit: OK, I didn't read carefully, while this is WSJ, it is
still a rumor, nothing has confirmed.... yet.Edit2: It is confirmed
now.Edit3: Yes AMD will be shipping die to Intel, and it is EMIB at
work.  https://www.pcworld.com/article/3235934/components-
processor...
 
  marcosdumay - 6 hours ago
  > And AMD, why now? When Zen is doing great...Well, last time AMD
  had an upper hand on the CPU's technical features, they tried
  taking Intel into a fight and couldn't handle it. Why would the
  same thing have a different result now?It is much smarter to not
  have a full-on direct fight.
 
    nolok - 5 hours ago
    They could handle it and beat them at several key points (1 ghz
    barrier, first to ship x86-64, first to integrate memory
    controller, not to mention eating the p4 for lunch performance
    wise), but Intel cheated and our justice department let them.
    The US refused to do anything, and the EU went at it a decade
    after the facts.I agree with your conclusion that fighting head
    on right now would not be smart when they have nvidia on one
    side and arm on the other. But not with your assertion that
    "AMD failed to defeat Intel products in the market" the last
    time.
 
      marcosdumay - 5 hours ago
      How they failed is of little relevance, since there is no
      reason to believe this time things would be different. (In
      fact, I would expect the US gov to be more corrupt now, not
      less.)
 
        nolok - 3 hours ago
        Yes it is of relevance, since the EU made it clear if Intel
        tried it again not only would they act much much more
        swiftly, but they would also be very tough.
 
    r00fus - 1 hours ago
    This.I'd love AMD to bloody Intel's nose (Intel deserves it
    after their payola anti-competitive behavior against AMD in the
    2000's), but it's clear that Intel is too big to fail.So AMD
    can win by helping Intel win.It is not good in the long run for
    consumers, but it's probably the right move for AMD today.
 
  trynumber9 - 8 hours ago
  Doesn't look like a rumor:https://newsroom.intel.com/editorials
  /new-intel-core-process...
 
  philjohn - 20 minutes ago
  This is actually a smart move for AMD, and here's why.These chips
  from Intel are going to be the super-high top end mobile chips in
  laptops that cost serious money, and have a rumoured 45w
  TDP.Raven Ridge on the other hand is a traditional AMD APU,
  albeit with a decent CPU component - it's not going after the
  same market segment at all, it's going after the segment where
  you want to maybe do some light e-sports gaming.This way, AMD
  gets both bites of the cherry - they get to sell their APUs with
  Zen, and they also get to target the super top end.
 
  Symmetry - 3 hours ago
  Intel wouldn't be willing to do something like this without the
  all too plausible now threat of a customer moving to a full AMD
  stack.  There are still reasons to prefer Intel in some cases but
  nobody has to feel like Intel is the only choice any more.
 
  bitcoinmoney - 2 hours ago
  No. This is not. Source: I know someone who worked at AMD before
  and this is not a remote possibility. Employees have been talking
  about this possibility openly inside the company. Why? Simply
  because the GPU is a HW black box that anybody can use (including
  the competitors). At least that's how I understood it.
 
  runeks - 2 hours ago
  > And AMD, why now? When Zen is doing great, has great roadmap
  and potential, along with much better GFx then Intel. Why?Why not
  now? Why not generate additional income from the sale of these
  Intel/AMD CPUs instead of relying on just Zen?This way, AMD can
  make money both when a Zen and a Core CPU is sold.
 
  microcolonel - 8 hours ago
  > But in any case, Why not just have Intel ship a Mobile CPU
  without iGPU and a Separate GPU.Power, manufacturing costs,
  integration and testing costs, design size...> Am I the only one
  who smell this as very "Apple" wanted?Why would Apple care about
  NVIDIA? They're already beating them in the kind of performance
  that matters on products Intel will be competing for.
 
    an_account - 6 hours ago
    Apple wants low powered, thin, but powerful chips.
 
      andrewjw - 6 hours ago
      In other words, exactly what everyone who uses chips wants.
 
        5ilv3r - 6 hours ago
        That's not true at all. Cost is king. Only flagship
        products care about pushing size down.
 
    bryanlarsen - 5 hours ago
    My theory on why Apple prefers AMD over nVidia:AMD hardware at
    a specific price point is more powerful than nVidia hardware at
    the same price point.   However, nVidia has superior drivers
    that eliminates the difference.And since Apple prefers to use
    their own drivers, nVidia loses their main point of
    differentiation.But of course the "Apple" drivers for video
    cards are basically vendor drivers with Apple doing QA &
    release management.  But the driver is nVidia's secret sauce,
    they're not going to show it to Apple, since Apple is now a
    very competitive GPU manufacturer.  At some point Apple will
    probably put their own GPU's inside Macs, so nVidia doesn't
    want to give them a head start.AMD cares less about giving
    Apple a head start because they care more about the short term
    than the long and competing against nVidia.
 
      dogma1138 - 4 hours ago
      AMD forked over the driver code, NVIDIA doesn?t let Apple
      handle the drivers and pushed CUDA which apple didn?t want
      anything to do with.As for the performance per buck thing
      it?s not accurate. For gaming and 3D applications AMD has a
      huge bottleneck in thier geometry pipeline which causes the
      to underperform in games especially pre VEGA. NVIDIA also
      used tile rasterization and shader output caching on die to
      increase performance this is something that AMD adopted only
      with VEGA.Pure flops don?t mean much even for compute.
 
  saas_co_de - 7 hours ago
  Kyle Bennet leaked this almost a year
  ago:https://hardforum.com/threads/from-ati-to-amd-back-to-
  ati-a-...
 
    arca_vorago - 5 hours ago
    If you don't read hardforum you should!
 
  gigatexal - 4 hours ago
  yep hell has indeed frozen over.
 
andy_ppp - 7 hours ago
This seems like a lose lose and a net negative for everyone.1) AMD
must be preventing Intel from in future building similar integrated
GPUs using anything like AMDs patent portfolio in GFX.2) Intel will
be able to 100% push out any vendors from moving to Ryzen for
presumably faster integrated graphics.3) Nvidia doesn't have an x86
CPU and last time I looked - all PCs and Mac laptops were using
x86.As some have speculated maybe this is Apple telling their
suppliers to jump and Intel and AMD said how high...I'm going to be
interested to see if we ever get a jump to Apple using ARM and
internally designed GPUs, I have a feeling that Jonny Ive must be
wetting himself over making a reasonably powerful laptop that thin.
 
  saas_co_de - 7 hours ago
  No, I think it is win-win.1) AMD can sell chips in high end
  systems where it can't compete with Intel on CPUs or Nvidia on
  GPUs.2) Intel can ship a high end graphics experience without
  dGPU which gets them a level of graphics in a form factor they
  couldn't otherwise achieve.3) Ryzen is a low/mid range chip. Even
  if it could match Intel's performance it could never match
  Intel's brand, and Intel doesn't want to match AMDs price so they
  will stay in different market segments. Ryzen sales will not be
  hurt.4) AMD gets valuable brand recognition by getting Radeon
  into more premium devices which could actually boost sales for
  cheaper Ryzen/Radeon devices down the line.5) Shafts Nvidia which
  is a win for both sides.6) Opens lines of communication for
  possible future merger or fab deal, which is not so much an issue
  from an anti-trust standpoint when you look at the total
  competitive landscape of ARM, Nvidia, Apple, Qualcomm, etc and
  the shrinking relevance of x86 in the big picture.
 
    nerpderp83 - 4 hours ago
    How is this not duopoly collusion to push out Nvidia? Smells
    just like 'competing gas stations' on opposite corners with the
    same exact prices.AMD can be Aldi, Intel can be Whole Foods.
 
    DeepYogurt - 6 hours ago
    I am deeply curious about point 6. If intel bought amd I think
    it would lead to a massive change in how systems are built. I
    know there's the danger of a full x86 monopoly, but nvidia has
    a lot of pressure on intel at the high end and if the windows
    arm thing ever takes off I'm sure nvidia will have a laptop
    chip out in no time.If there is a merger, I hope this will make
    a lot of AMD dream projects like the HPC APU take off, but I
    also fear that it might lead to a more stagnant intel+amd in a
    few years time.
 
      mjevans - 1 hours ago
      They could never do a merger for anti-trust and dual sourcing
      concerns...Having said that, it MIGHT open up the potential
      for AMD running (some, all?) chips through Intel's fabs and
      actually enabling a nearly competitive playing field.The best
      thing that the (US) government could do for the market would
      actually be to force Intel to split in to a fabrication
      company and a chip design company.  That would enable the
      military to contract fabrication of higher-end validated CPUs
      on US soil from whichever sources they wanted...
 
    sambe - 6 hours ago
    Regarding 3): most benchmarks I've seen quote 2-7% difference
    in IPC to Intel. I wouldn't call that low/mid-range. Am I
    misunderstanding something?
 
      coldtea - 6 hours ago
      From the parent: "Even if it could match Intel's performance
      it could never match Intel's brand".
 
        dahauns - 6 hours ago
        Not with that attitude.(i.e. argued that way this would be
        more like "setting up for failure" on AMDs part.)
 
          saas_co_de - 6 hours ago
          Brand perceptions can definitely change but the reality
          right now is that for the past 5 years AMD has been
          shipping non-competitive parts and has had zero premium
          design wins and very little money spent on
          advertising.For the average consumer, every high end
          system they have seen in recent memory is Intel, and
          every ad they have seen is Intel, and if they have seen
          AMD at all it has always been positioned as a budget
          product.That is going to take a long time for AMD to turn
          around assuming they can sustain performance parity with
          Intel.That is also why AMD is focused on servers and
          semi-custom where they are selling to technical people
          who are evaluating based on price/performance and not
          based on brand perception.
 
          dahauns - 12 minutes ago
          Yeah, I know...it's just in light of this argument the
          timing seems strange.AMD are on the brink of offering
          products that for the first time since forever at least
          has potential to build up their brand vs Intel, to
          actually have a significant differentiator that they can
          market. It seems really harsh to kill that before it even
          begins. But yeah, it could actually be a sign that AMD
          knows it couldn't go the whole nine yards in this game
          anyway.
 
          myrandomcomment - 5 hours ago
          I am pretty sure the current PS4 and Xbox count as
          premium design wins for AMD.
 
          nerpderp83 - 4 hours ago
          And consumers don't say, I want the same processor as the
          Xbox.
 
          freeflight - 4 hours ago
          There's nothing "premium" about those gaming consoles,
          maybe the PS4Pro/XboneX could be considered "premium" for
          the console sector.Imho parent was talking about the PC
          sector and in that regard, AMD has been sadly trailing
          way behind Intel/Nvidia for quite a while now. AMD has
          struggled to oppose Intel's i5/i7 dominance. Similarly,
          they still have no real competition for the high-end
          NVidia GPU's, like the 1080's.If money is not a limiting
          factor, then you will be hard-pressed to come up with a
          build that does not include an Intel CPU and at least one
          Nvidia GPU.
 
      saas_co_de - 6 hours ago
      Brand is more important than benchmarks for most buyers and
      even if AMD chips were better Intel would still be the
      premium brand.
 
        zanny - 6 hours ago
        Are people actually looking to buy a computer for an Intel
        CPU? I have honestly never met anyone that said "I need my
        computer to be Intel Inside? ". They just say they want
        fast / modern / able to do X task and 99% of people have no
        idea what a CPU even is.
 
          selectodude - 5 hours ago
          To most consumers, AMD sounds like a knockoff brand. Have
          you even seen an AMD commercial in the last decade?
 
          bsznjyewgd - 14 minutes ago
          My dad went to Best Buy to replace his 10+ year old
          laptop last year. He actually said he wanted Intel
          instead of AMD because he heard AMD processors were very
          slow. I had to tell him the Intel N-whatever and Celerons
          were also very slow so that he'd stick with one of the
          i-whatevers.
 
          remir - 3 hours ago
          I would say yes. Intel are better at marketing than AMD
          (think decades of TV ads and the little Intel Inside
          stickers).
 
          nordsieck - 5 hours ago
          You might have a good point for the home market - I
          couldn't say either way.  I do know for the corporate
          market, businesses want as low a number of SKUs to
          support as possible, and so they will often only buy
          Intel (and only specific CPU models at that).  This is
          particularly true in the datacenter / cloud world.
 
          com2kid - 3 hours ago
          > Are people actually looking to buy a computer for an
          Intel CPU? I have honestly never met anyone that said "I
          need my computer to be Intel Inside? ".I've had friends
          go out to buy a computer and insist on an i7 because "it
          is the best."Same people who buy the newest Samsung
          Galaxy every year.
 
  dahauns - 6 hours ago
  >As some have speculated maybe this is Apple telling their
  suppliers to jump and Intel and AMD said how high...That sounds a
  bit far fetched IMO. They aren't that dominant in the PC market
  (esp. compared to the Big Three (Lenovo, HP, Dell)) for Intel and
  AMD to warrant such an "out there" cooperation just at the behest
  of Apple...
 
    selectodude - 5 hours ago
    Lenovo/HP/Dell might sell more units, but every single Apple
    product has a high end i5/i7 or extreme low power part in it.
    The margins for Intel are likely an order of magnitude higher
    from Apple than Dell.
 
      dahauns - 19 minutes ago
      I think you overestimate the heft of Apple in x86 world.a)
      Sure, Apple doesn't have a low end and as such higher overall
      margins, but: The Big Three all have a sizable
      mid-/highend/ultrabook/business range as well with just the
      same i5/i7/core m CPUs (only updated more often). Apple
      surely is a good customer, but I severely doubt that the
      overall margin difference for Intel between them and Apple is
      even in the remote vicinity of an order of magnitude.  What
      is an o.o.m. higher though is the market share of those three
      (~60% vs ~6%).b) I just don't see a bargaining chip. What's
      the "or else" from Apple's side? Full Ryzen? Would actually
      be cool, but Ryzen is still completely unproven in the mobile
      world, and this would be all the more reason for AMD not to
      enter the deal. ARM? Yeah...I wouldn't hold my breath.You
      have to consider that this isn't a simple internal SKU
      customizing, but a significant and delicate licensing deal
      with THE direct competitor in x86 world. (The tech is
      actually the simpler part, seeing that it's not an integrated
      solution but a MCM.) Apple would have to have severe leverage
      that they would be the main driver for Intel for such a move.
      Or they are paying a real buttload for this tech - but then
      you can be sure they want exclusivity. And the statement
      really doesn't sound like it.
 
  fleetfox - 3 hours ago
  Isn't Apple market-share of x86 tiny?
 
  zerohp - 3 hours ago
  Regarding 3. It's rumored in the chip design community that
  NVidia designed an x86 CPU and got as far as engineering sample
  silicon but the project was cancelled because they couldn't work
  out the licensing.
 
grogenaut - 6 hours ago
Any chance this is try before you buy for Intel?
 
  Strom - 3 hours ago
  Close to zero chance of Intel being allowed to buy AMD, unless
  they open up x86 for others. Although if alternative
  architectures like ARM start gaining some actual ground on
  desktops/laptops, say in 20 years, then it might not trigger
  anti-monopoly bells as hard.Then there's the option of Intel
  buying just the Radeon parts of the company. However seeing as
  the GPU market seems to be growing fast, it would have to be
  quite the offer for shareholders to agree.
 
itissid - 3 hours ago
Some thoughts from anandtech:  "The agreement between AMD and Intel
is that Intel is buying chips from AMD, and AMD is providing a
driver support package like they do with consoles. There is no
cross-licensing of IP going on: Intel likely provided AMD with the
IP to make the EMIB chipset connections for the graphics but that
IP is only valid in the designs that AMD is selling to
Intel"[1][1]https://www.anandtech.com/show/12003/intel-to-create-
new-8th...
 
  mozumder - 1 hours ago
  If EMIB is that valuable, then they should expand it to main
  system memory as well as NVMe flash/XPoint storage.
 
cjensen - 6 hours ago
Worth noting: Skylake and Kaby Lake have been horror shows for
Intel Integrated GPUs driver crashes. To add to this, some paths
(like DXVA) are actually slower than Haswell.I wonder how much of
this is a fix for GPU reliability rather than GPU performance.
 
  craftyguy - 2 hours ago
  > Skylake and Kaby Lake have been horror shows for Intel
  Integrated GPUs driver crashesMy experience with Intel iGPUs on
  skylake and kaby lake is quite different. They work very well on
  Linux.
 
    cjensen - 1 hours ago
    I guess I should have clarified: Win7