GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-03) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
iPhone X Teardown
199 points by hutattedonmyarm
https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone%2BX%2BTeardown/98975
opher.com
___________________________________________________________________
 
marze - 3 hours ago
The most impressive thing to me is how similar the iPhone X is to
the original iPhone (shown side by side in the second picture).Ten
years ago, Apple totally nailed the design. Same buttons, same
speaker design, same full panel display.  Even design work by a
company as talented as Apple, you might expect that a new model ten
years into the future may look quite different, but it looks the
same.
 
  jack6e - 2 hours ago
  > The most impressive thing to me is how similar the iPhone X is
  to the original iPhone (shown side by side in the second
  picture).And really, how similar every non-notebook/desktop Apple
  product has been to each other one. Design-wise, the iPhone was
  just an iPod with a bigger screen; iPod touch/nano/other
  variations are obviously just an iPhone in different sizes; the
  watch is just the iPod nano on a wristband; iPad is a bigger
  iPhone. Apple hasn't released a fundamentally new design idea in
  over a decade.On the one hand, the consistency of physical design
  is its own type of branding and creates solid brand recognition.
  On the other hand, the UI/UX that transformed interacting in the
  digital world from using keyboards and mice to using our fingers
  on touch screens is already old. Apple really has no need to be
  creative since they are still profiting from their slight
  modifications. But the next big, real revolution in personal
  computing design and usage will need to be more than a glass
  rectangle with slightly better curved edges.
 
    tqkxzugoaupvwqr - 1 hours ago
    Why do you want them to design their products differently from
    previous models just for the sake of it? Apple iterates on
    their designs. Few/no changes mean Apple thinks their product
    is close to perfect (in the context of the available technology
    and intended usage).I much prefer Apple?s iterative and proven
    designs than other manufacturers? products that are seemingly
    designed without experience from previous generations.
 
      thomasjudge - 1 hours ago
      Not to mention the equivalent in software, designers forcing
      new UI's on us with each major release. Looking at you, MSFT.
      Especially when those changes are largely w/r/t what's now
      trendy, such as the recent iteration in design towards
      everything flat.Not intending to start a design-related
      flamewar..
 
    valuearb - 56 minutes ago
    The iPod team was given first shot at making the Apple phone.
    They lost to the Mac team. Design-wise the iPhone was just the
    (secret) Mac tablet with a smaller screen.
 
    Terretta - 1 hours ago
    > the UI/UX that transformed interacting in the digital world
    from using keyboards and mice to using our fingers on touch
    screens is already old.The pencil is already old too.  So?It's
    not clear to me that for things to be usable the way they get
    used has to change at some particular rate.  On the contrary,
    the most usable user experiences (UXs) seem to be quite stable.
 
    djrogers - 1 hours ago
    > Design-wise, the iPhone was just an iPod with a bigger
    screenThat's revisionist at it's best, and ridiculously untrue
    at it's worst.  iPods in 2007 were about 1/3rd screen, and
    2/3rds clickwheel. They were shaped like, and as thick as, a
    pack pf playing cards, made of plastic and metal (not glass),
    and basically shared nothing with the iPhone's design. When
    that device was released, we'd never seen anything like it.
 
  saagarjha - 3 hours ago
  > Same buttonsThere might be a button or two missing?
 
    marze - 3 hours ago
    True, but look at the change phones from ten years pre-iphone
    vs iPhone.http://www.mobilephonehistory.co.uk/lists/by_year.htm
    lHuge change. But after Apple nailed the modern smartphone
    design on the first try, ten years later it is remarkably
    unchanged.
 
      robotresearcher - 2 hours ago
      Remarkably, yes. But this release removing the biggest, most
      used, iconic button might not be the ideal moment to claim
      "same buttons!"
 
        mikeash - 1 hours ago
        75% the same after ten years is not too shabby!
 
  phinnaeus - 3 hours ago
  > Same full panel displayWhat?
 
    Zee2 - 3 hours ago
    I mean, relative to the competition, the original iPhone was
    certainly rather "full panel"!http://www.techpavan.com/wp-
    content/uploads/mobile-phone-mar...Devoting the majority of the
    vertical dimension of the profile of the phone to display was
    definitely not a priority of the market at the time.
 
      Animats - 3 hours ago
      The Nikon CoolPix S80 line of cameras were full-panel
      displays. That was probably the first full-panel device. This
      turned out to be less than useful.  It's hard to hold the
      thing stable when taking a picture without touching the touch
      screen.
 
mandeepj - 2 hours ago
Steve Jobs -  "People who are really serious about software should
make their own hardware."
 
  noblethrasher - 1 hours ago
  He actually attributed that to Alan Kay at the first iPhone
  event:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAfTXYa36f4
 
  alaaibrahim - 2 hours ago
  That was Alan KayEdit: Adding sourcehttps://www.folklore.org/Stor
  yView.py?project=Macintosh&stor...
 
    jonknee - 2 hours ago
    To be fair, that wouldn't stop Steve from claiming it was his
    idea.
 
      B1FF_PSUVM - 2 hours ago
      "I did not say it.""You will."(Oscar Wilde, if memory serves)
 
sk2code - 1 hours ago
Hardware company or Software company, we can always debate about it
and choose whatever we want to say. In few years Apple will be a
"Trillion dollar company" and there won't be any debate or doubt
about it.
 
Synaesthesia - 1 hours ago
The video of the infrared dots is quite interesting.
 
  valine - 10 minutes ago
  The iFixit video doesn't show it very clearly. Seeing the dots up
  close is crazy:
  https://twitter.com/reckless/status/926466977413128192?ref_s...
 
asteli - 2 hours ago
This is an engineering masterpiece. The electrical engineer in me
is mind-blown. I love the inter-PCB BGA-style interface. Standoff,
connector and shield all in one component. And the component
density is stunning.Clean internal layout, relatively serviceable,
structured light 3D scanning built in. You can debate whether or
not  Apple have made good UI decisions, but the hardware design
execution here is superb.
 
  overcyn - 1 hours ago
  Yeah I don't know the slightest about electrical engineering but
  the spacer that servers as a connector struck me as super clever.
 
timthelion - 1 hours ago
I don't understand, when they got rid of the audio jack and added
wireless charging, why does the phone have ports at all? Couldn't
they make a port-less phone?
 
  mattnewton - 1 hours ago
  Diagnostics, developer experience and backups are all hard to do
  wirelessly, but I am sure they are thinking about it.
 
    moduspol - 1 hours ago
    We (developers) can already build and run wirelessly since a
    year or so ago, and iTunes will back up your iPhone wirelessly,
    too.It does need to be plugged in once and then enabled, but
    after that you're off to the races. We're actually pretty
    close. It wouldn't surprise me if the next iPhone had no ports,
    although they'll probably save that for a non-S year.
 
  leerob - 1 hours ago
  I mean, they could. But does that mean they should? Personally, I
  don't think so.
 
synaesthesisx - 1 hours ago
Does anyone have any more details/teardown on the new front sensor?
Curious if there's a Xilinx chip/FPGA in there....
 
fermienrico - 1 hours ago
The SIM card holder's size shows its age. It is literally as big as
the A11 package.Such archaic things need to evolve or disappear.
What's the status on electronic SIM? We don't need a piece of
plastic that holds a numeric key and takes up EXPENSIVE real-estate
in one of the most densely packed electronic devices in the
world.Apple doesn't have the leverage to sway the standards?
 
  dzhiurgis - 1 hours ago
  But how does it work while travelling?Yes you can buy roaming
  packs, but local SIM cards are as low as 5$ for unlimited LTE.
 
  stock_toaster - 1 hours ago
    >  don't need a piece of plastic that holds a numeric key
  Doesn't a SIM include a small micro-controller and firmware
  (ref#1)? It isn't just a numeric key holder.In addition, wouldn't
  having an apple designed electronic SIM reduce what 3rd party
  firmware (hardware SIM card) is running on their devices? Seems
  like a good deal to me.ref#1:
  https://www.slideshare.net/c.enrique.ortiz/sim-card-overview
 
    fermienrico - 17 minutes ago
    It doesn?t matter. My argument still stands regardless of
    what?s inside the chip holder and the card. The point is - it?s
    a relatively simple thing compared to the complexity of the
    rest of the phone. It needs to be eradicated.
 
  SadWebDeveloper - 1 hours ago
  Its funny that in the old days the main selling point of GSM/SIM-
  Cards were that you could physically change from phone to phone
  and kept your line (and contacts), now we the recent race to get
  things as little as possible and that virtually no one is using
  by default any of the extra-GSM functionalities has (contact
  backup), coming back to a non-physical identity as the solution
  (like in the CDMA days) that will force you to go to carrier
  every time you need to change yout phone and depend on 3rd party
  online services for the extra functionalities.
 
  GeekyBear - 56 minutes ago
  The current nano-SIM standard is something that was created by
  Apple.https://www.cnet.com/news/sim-card-maker-apples-design-
  won-s...Since then, Apple has been pushing for carriers to
  support a new standard for an embedded chip in the device to hold
  the data currently stored on one or more removable SIM cards.>The
  Apple SIM supports wireless services across multiple supported
  carriers, which can be selected from a user interface within
  their operating systems, removing the need to install a SIM
  provided by the carrier
  itself.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_SIM
 
  foolfoolz - 8 minutes ago
  the sim is no piece of plastic. SIM cards are computers! they
  have a CPU. they have memory, a file system. they run applets,
  yes Java applets. sims are one of the most secure pieces of
  technology out there, part of the Secure Element standard. the
  sim is responsible for a lot of your phones security. lots of
  encryption keys live on the sim and nothing can access them at
  all. I am much much happier to trust the hardware than software
  for some of this. smaller form factors are always coming out for
  sim, but it's worth the space
 
  parent5446 - 1 hours ago
  https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/4/16424740/google-pixel-2-x...
 
    valuearb - 57 minutes ago
    The Pixel is a great example of how Google is trying to cast
    off the constraints of Android's distribution model. I really
    think they can do it, but it's going to take a long effort.
    Eventually all the cheap phones will be Android and
    Google/Samsung/Apple will fight for the premium market. And
    it's unclear how long Samsung will remain in the fight given
    their lack of control over the OS and hardware integration.
 
  mattnewton - 1 hours ago
  They have an electronic sim on the watch- I imagine that?s
  serving as a test bed for the carriers and for apple.
 
  okanesen - 1 hours ago
  They did it with their most recent Apple Watch, which could be a
  first start to also bring it to the iPhone. They probably want to
  first get the adoption going, before making it available
  globally.
 
  roywiggins - 1 hours ago
  Apple build something like this into the Apple Watch, I
  think.https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/12/the-cellular-enabled-
  apple...
 
BinaryIdiot - 2 hours ago
I'm still on the fence about whether this is a great phone or not
because I use every one of my phones a significant amount when not
directly looking at it.But this hardware is absolutely incredible.
I wish there was a clear casing to the phone. Apple has always done
a great job design the internals and clearly this is no exception.
 
  manmal - 1 hours ago
  IMO it?s even better suitable than previous iPhones for that
  situation. A tap on the display will wake it up and you can start
  looking at notifications, swipe to get the camera.. or if you
  refer to Siri, it?s still a button press.
 
diggan - 3 hours ago
Is there another reason than space-saving for the two batteries
instead of one bigger one but L-shaped?
 
  slezyr - 2 hours ago
  I don't think that L-shaped battery can be made.Imagine a list of
  paper which you need to fold into compact form. It would be
  really hard to fold it into "L".Batteries made of long sheets
  folded then into rectanglehttp://images.indianexpress.com/2017/01
  /galaxynote7_info_1.j...
 
    fiatpandas - 2 hours ago
    The "jelly roll" is just one packing technique. You can pack
    flat sheets, so in theory can create an L shape.Another guess
    is with an L shaped battery, thermal expansion makes it tricky
    because the L shaped compartment has a sharp inner corner which
    runs this risk of stressing the battery when it expands. A
    square compartment does not have that issue.In any event, Apple
    knows how to produce weird shaped batteries. Just look at the
    Macbook. But it's in a nicely shape space.
 
      alanbernstein - 1 hours ago
      Which Macbook? The ones I've seen have a series of
      rectangular cells to fill an awkward space.
 
        fiatpandas - 1 hours ago
        See here: https://d3nevzfk7ii3be.cloudfront.net/igi/DgO4M5U
        NBt1xfvqm.h...Irregular in 3 dimensions (terraced).
 
  asteli - 2 hours ago
  My guesses:- Cheaper to produce / higher yields than an L shape?-
  LiIon batteries have a power density <-> energy density tradeoff.
  Perhaps the batteries have different chemistries so as to get the
  best of both worlds.
 
  gbba - 3 hours ago
  Splitting a battery into two cells might mean it can charge twice
  as fast in parallel.
 
    pkulak - 3 hours ago
    Unfortunately, no.
 
      gxs - 2 hours ago
      Not agreeing or disagreeing - just curious, why is that?
 
      biggerfisch - 2 hours ago
      Not that I don't believe you, but could you explain why and
      educate the rest of us?
 
      BinaryIdiot - 2 hours ago
      Hmm, this is what I thought as well. Just like if I have a
      splitter plugged into the wall and two USB cables attached I
      can charge those two devices as fast as if there was one item
      plugged in. So why wouldn't this be faster?
 
      kogepathic - 2 hours ago
      > Unfortunately, no.Explanation as to why this isn't the
      case:TL;DR - putting the cells in parallel without changing
      their C-rating does nothing for charging them faster. You're
      limited by the C-rating of the cells, which is usually
      determined by the quality of components and the anode/cathode
      design.Putting batteries in parallel maintains the voltage of
      one cell but multiplies the current by the number of cells in
      the pack.E.g. if you have two Lithium Polymer cells in
      parallel, the nominal voltage will be 3.8V. At 5W, the
      current would be ~1.3APutting batteries in series adds the
      cell voltages while keeping current the same for the
      pack.e.g. if you have two Lithium Polymer cells in series,
      the nominal voltage of the pack would be 7.6V and at 5W the
      current would be ~0.66A. Notice compared to the parallel
      example: voltage is doubled, current is halved.What you need
      to compare here is the so-called "C-rating" (capacity rating)
      of the cell. All the C-rating means is that if you provide
      this much current, the cell is full in an hour. A C.10 rating
      would be the current over 10 hours. C.20 current over 20
      hours, etc.e.g. you have a 3.8V LiPo cell that's 2000mAh. A
      C-rating of 1 means you charge or discharge at 2A and it's
      full/dead in an hour.So, putting batteries in parallel keeps
      their voltage the same but "doubles" the current.However this
      entire time we've been talking about current, when we should
      be talking about power.If your 2000mAh battery has a C-rating
      of 1, meaning you can charge it at maximum at the capacity of
      the battery, then in parallel you have 4000mAh (2x2000mAh) at
      3.8V, meaning you can safely charge it at 4000mAx3.8V =
      ~15WPut the same two cells in series. Now you have 2000mAh at
      7.6V. How fast can you charge it? 2000mAx7.6V = ~15W.Consumer
      electronics don't need a high C-rating because the cells
      don't need to charge/discharge at extremely high rates (as
      they would in a quadcopter, for example).The main benefit of
      putting cells in series is that you raise the voltage, which
      lowers the current and thus means you can use smaller (and
      cheaper) wires to carry the same power.Putting the cells in
      parallel would increase the current for the same power, but
      it does not change the C-rating and thus the amount of power
      you can safely put into the cells.
 
      [deleted]
 
    bluthru - 2 hours ago
    Why aren't they doing this?
 
  fiatpandas - 2 hours ago
  Maybe it's too materially inefficient to cut an L shaped
  electrode.
 
    MBCook - 2 hours ago
    That?s my assumption. It?s probably much easier to fab two
    batteries to fit the space available in the phone than to use
    just one and leave empty space or have it made in an ?exotic?
    shape like a non-rectangle.
 
nsxwolf - 3 hours ago
Do you really need to hold it up to your face like I've been
seeing? The reviewers look so awkward and uncomfortable. I was
hoping it would see your face laying on the desk and whatnot.
 
  gehsty - 2 hours ago
  You have to point the sensor towards your face and look at the
  screen.So far feels pretty natural, 70-80% time the phone is
  unlocked before I think ?is the phone unlocked? the rest of the
  time I forget I need to glance (literally glance with your eyes)
  at the phone, which I think comes from muscle memory of from
  unlocking with touchid and not looking at the phone while it
  unlocks...Passive security, will become standard across screen
  based interfaces in the next 5-10yrs...
 
    dom96 - 3 minutes ago
    I'm curious about the battery usage of this. If it's constantly
    looking for faces, won't this drain the battery significantly?
 
  valuearb - 2 hours ago
  You need to look at it.Just like when you use it.
 
    JustSomeNobody - 2 hours ago
    I can't tell if you're being passive aggressive or not.Many,
    many people have pointed out that looking directly at the phone
    (as needed by Face ID), is NOT the only way to use a phone.
    Sometimes one just wants to glance down at the screen to see a
    notification.  Watch Nilay's review and you'll see what I mean.
 
      derefr - 2 hours ago
      You look at the phone to unlock it; notifications still
      display when the phone is locked. I believe waking up the
      phone just involves raising it a bit (like in the Watch),
      along with some light-sensor heuristic (like in the AirPods.)
      Or, y?know, pressing the sleep button.
 
        calibration263 - 2 hours ago
        You can also wake the phone up now by tapping the
        display(similar to the watch). Also it might be
        configurable in settings but the notification content is
        hidden on the X when the phone is locked, after FaceID they
        become visible.
 
        ClassyJacket - 1 hours ago
        >You look at the phone to unlock it; notifications still
        display when the phone is locked.Actually, by default they
        don't display the content of notifications until it
        recognises your face. But you may be able to turn this off.
 
    nsxwolf - 2 hours ago
    I never unlock my phone by picking it up, holding it in front
    of my face, looking at it, and then putting my thumb on the
    sensor.I pick it up off my desk with my thumb on the home
    button and it's unlocked long before I start using the phone.I
    also frequently use my phone laying flat on the desk, reaching
    over and just pressing the home button.
 
jaux - 2 hours ago
> Repairability 6 out of 10That's a big surprise to me!
 
  duskwuff - 1 hours ago
  iFixit has historically rated Apple devices rather harshly for
  their (non-)repairability. 6/10, from them, is high praise.
 
    elicash - 1 hours ago
    iPhones have gotten 6's and 7's in recent years.
 
      abritinthebay - 56 minutes ago
      mainly, I think, they realized it's a trend and they can't
      just give every single thing 0/10 each time.
 
doe88 - 2 hours ago
It seems this is the second times after the Apple Watch 3 in
september that the Wifi/BT module is branded with the Apple name.
Does someone knows if they have designed their own Wifi/BT chipset
or if it is licensed from somebody else?
 
  wmeredith - 2 hours ago
  They're def doing something of their own with BT. The airpods use
  it, but it's been highly modified.
 
mankash666 - 3 hours ago
Truly impressive. Smaller, yet faster than the competition.
Surprising how many of the chips are now internal Apple components:
1. CPU/GPU 2. Auxiliary Machine Learning/AI chip 3. NAND controller
4. IR Deapth sensor & signal processing chip 5. Power management IC
(surprising that Apple is doing Analog IC design too!)Axiom in the
tech world is that "Apple is a software company that builds
hardware". Above is ample evidence of Apple being a hardware-heavy
innovation machine.A software company building hardware is Google,
and it's Pixel phones show
 
  wnevets - 2 hours ago
  With how buggy iOS 11 is/was, it really does show where their
  focus has been.
 
    mandeepj - 2 hours ago
    Software bugs can be fixed with iterations but
    hardware....nope. Not without a recall
 
      [deleted]
 
      cjsuk - 1 hours ago
      Clever software workarounds can save a board respin if you?re
      lucky. I?ve seen it done before.
 
    coldtea - 1 hours ago
    Why, how buggy iOS 11 is/was? Works perfectly fine for me on my
    7+.
 
    ForrestN - 2 hours ago
    I think this personification of companies as people is
    misleading. Whose "focus?"Do you mean you think that the same
    people within Apple are working on both hardware and software,
    and are focusing more on hardware? Or that you think many
    people who write software have been re-educated, re-assigned,
    and are now working on hardware?I assume that the size of
    Apple's teams working on iPhone are limited by more than
    resources, and the recruitment pools are totally separate, so
    it's not like they're spending too much on hardware engineers
    and can't afford enough software engineers, right?I just don't
    really know how you can conceive of such a massive company as
    having an obviously zero-sum "focus" like a person has.
 
      brians - 2 hours ago
      Quality comes from feedback control systems. Quality of
      design comes from management oversight and correction. Fan-in
      is a concern. Orphaned teams become a concern at a tenth
      Apple?s scale. Informal networks and approval based on trust
      of people rather than examination of product is a concern.
      Executive attention is expensive.
 
      Spooky23 - 2 hours ago
      The hardware engineering is much more deliberate and well
      planned/orchestrated than the software.IMO it?s less ?focus?
      and more having to rely on third party manufacturers who will
      push back due to liability.iOS 11 is a beta quality product.
      One org that I?m familiar with has a 5x increase in help desk
      calls and replacements, mostly around the voice phone
      components failing.
 
  alvis - 3 hours ago
  Strategically, I think Apple has made a right move by
  internalising all the hardware designs. That said, as many have
  suggested, the new iPhone is no more than just another faster,
  smaller, and costlier.
 
    criddell - 3 hours ago
    Doesn't Samsung do that as well though? They make screens, and
    CPUs and many of the other components in a modern phone, don't
    they?I'm wondering when Apple will start making their own
    camera sensors.
 
      mankash666 - 2 hours ago
      Multiple differences between Samsung and Apple:1. Samsung was
      a semiconductor maker, that successfully moved up to make
      phones. Apple was a integrator of third party chips that
      successfully went down to own many of the chips.2. Apple's
      chips are significantly better than the competition. Partly
      because the chip division has a captive customer whose
      requirements are more apparent, plus no middlemen thanks to
      the vertical integration3. Samsung's components need to serve
      multiple segments of the phone market, and other external
      customers. Apple only builds for Apple's specs4. Every new
      breakthrough on the iPhone has been because of a chip that
      Apple alone had. From the very first iPhone's capacitive
      touch sensors to the new IR sensor system, no one else has
      the access for a couple phone cycles. Apple put out a 64 bit
      ARM processor even before arm had finalized the instruction
      set
 
        Vogtinator - 2 hours ago
        4. Is absolutely wrong in every aspect. Most "innovation"
        was bought tech (primesense, for instance). The ARMv8 ISA
        was finalized ages before the chips got designed. Middle of
        2011 IIRC.
 
          mankash666 - 2 hours ago
          True - They bought 3rd party companies with the tech.
          Still doesn't change the observation that they made it
          better, and tailored it specifically for the iPhone. None
          of those sensors have drop in replacements. And Apple put
          out the 64bit proc prior to ARM having IP --> FACt
 
      muninn_ - 3 hours ago
      Basically, yeah, they don't make the OS. I think the parent
      comment was more aimed at software companies. Though, you
      could look at it from the opposite point of view as well.
 
      valuearb - 2 hours ago
      Samsung's screens are excellent, but their CPU/GPU
      performance is a generation (or more) behind Apple. Plus they
      are way behind in integrated functionality such as motion
      coprocessor, ai processing, and secure enclave.I don't know
      how true this is, but I've heard that the Samsung OLED screen
      on the iPhone X is significantly better than the ones Samsung
      puts on it's flagship phones, in color fidelity especially.
      Partly because of Apple's attention to detail, but  also
      because Samsung's flagship phones ship in much higher volume
      than the X is expected to.
 
        sundvor - 1 hours ago
        Yeah the S8 and S8 Plus had (has?) significant top/side
        edge colour shift.(Speaking as the owner of the Plus, who
        has his first replaced and the second is somewhat better
        but not perfect. Wife's S8 is also affected but she doesn't
        see it or doesn't care. I would still take that slight
        imperfection over the horrid notch though).
 
        MBCook - 2 hours ago
        I can believe it. The quality is all about cost. What level
        of rejected units can you accept for price $X? If Apple can
        pay more (due to cost, scale, or just where the price of
        the phone is allocated between parts) they can buy a better
        screen.
 
        vilmosi - 1 hours ago
        >>> I don't know how true this is, but I've heard that the
        Samsung OLED screen on the iPhone X is significantly better
        than the ones Samsung puts on it's flagship phonesI can't
        believe that. I just can't.All iPhone X reviews mention the
        screen tech difference, all of them say how they don't
        notice a difference.
 
          valuearb - 1 hours ago
          Most reviewers (and people) don't appreciate color
          fidelity. Jon Gruber was just talking about how Google
          spent the time/effort to make the colors of the Pixel
          display more accurate and natural, and then people
          complain they don't "pop" and look as good as the super-
          saturated colors on other android phones.
 
          vilmosi - 54 minutes ago
          >>> Most reviewers (and people) don't appreciate color
          fidelityIt's not about "appreciating". It's that it
          doesn't matter. Everyone talked about retina resolution,
          then about "true colors".Today we have Samsung making all
          the screens.The point is, nobody except professionals
          care.
 
      GeekyBear - 2 hours ago
      Samsung has a problem with adding features to their devices
      that are simply not well executed.For instance, from the NY
      Times review of the Galaxy Note 8:>Some of the biometrics,
      including the ability to unlock your phone by scanning your
      face or irises, are so poorly executed that they feel like
      marketing gimmicks as opposed to actual security features.htt
      ps://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/05/technology/personaltech/s...
 
      MBCook - 2 hours ago
      Not quite. Samsung fabs chips. They may even design chips.
      But they don?t work ?together?.Samsung makes 5 processors and
      puts them on the open market.The another part of Samsung buys
      those chips off the shelf and used them in their phones.My
      understanding is the two units don?t work together hand in
      hand like Apples teams do, they work together the way Samsung
      and HTC do.
 
    gehsty - 3 hours ago
    Just smaller and faster with new technology, never before seen
    delivered at this size, capability or scale.What does Apple
    have to do to impress people? Do all this then give the phones
    away for free?
 
      [deleted]
 
      chaostheory - 2 hours ago
      Louis CK - everything is amazing... but no one is
      happy.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUBtKNzoKZ
 
        hinkley - 2 hours ago
        Easily one of his best bits and he did it on a talk show.
 
          chaostheory - 1 hours ago
          It helped spawn an app too: https://theymadethat.com
 
      vilmosi - 1 hours ago
      >>> Just smaller and faster with new technology, never before
      seen delivered at this size, capability or scale.That was
      happening every year and marginal at best.
 
      hinkley - 2 hours ago
      People used to bitch about why people thought the MacBook was
      so cool when it was ?only? 5mm thinner than anything else on
      the market.The low end doesn?t understand why people pay so
      much more for fit and finish.Except automobiles. Everyone
      seems to accept and even approve of the high end for cars.
 
        TylerE - 2 hours ago
        Fit and finish on many "high end" cars is actually pretty
        abysmal. Especially basically anything Italian.
 
          tigershark - 2 hours ago
          Oh..I didn't know that your Ferrari had a shit finish,
          you must have been quite unlucky...
 
          serf - 1 hours ago
          I can personally attest to the poor quality of
          Lamborghini paint and coating from 98 til 2011.The dashes
          split apart, all the clear coat on the carbon elements
          falls off, the paint oxidizes.Park a 2003 Murcielago next
          to a 98 Lexus or Toyota (of any kind). You'll be real
          surprised which one weathered better.Anyway, I digress,
          but I can agree with the point that 'high end car' is a
          lot different than 'high quality car' or 'long lasting
          car'.
 
          tigershark - 55 minutes ago
          So do you mean as soon as it was sold in 1998 to Audi, a
          German group, right? And what it has to do with the
          "abysmal" finish of Italian high end car?
 
          cjsuk - 1 hours ago
          My Fiat is awful! ;)
 
      noncoml - 2 hours ago
      Why do you get so defensive? What in ?is no more than just
      another faster, smaller, and costlier? is not accurate?
 
    bluthru - 2 hours ago
    >That said, as many have suggested, the new iPhone is no more
    than just another faster, smaller, and costlier.FaceID is a
    huge leap and affects how people use their phones. The phone
    can behave differently if you are looking at it. For example:
    showing sensitive info only if you're looking at it, and not
    playing notification sounds as loud (or at all) if you see the
    notification as it comes in.
 
      GeekyBear - 2 hours ago
      There's an interesting article from the folks at Wired who
      have been attempting to fool Face ID without any success so
      far.https://www.wired.com/story/tried-to-beat-face-id-and-
      failed...
 
    austenallred - 1 hours ago
    > the new iPhone is no more than just another faster, smaller,
    and costlier.I'm sold. I'll take it.
 
  abritinthebay - 1 hours ago
  > "Apple is a software company that builds hardware". Above is
  ample evidence of Apple being a hardware-heavy innovation
  machine.I disagree with both.Apple is a design company that
  builds hardware and software together so the design works as
  intended.
 
  JustSomeNobody - 2 hours ago
  Who thinks Apple is a software company? Because they're wrong.
  Apple started off making hardware and they've always made
  hardware. They make software to compliment their hardware.
 
    draw_down - 1 hours ago
    Even they claim it. It?s that old Alan Kay quote, you know.
 
    wmeredith - 2 hours ago
    This. They've become more and more a hardware company as they
    give away almost of their software now to move more IRL
    gadgets.
 
  ksk - 3 hours ago
  Indeed, Apple is excellent at integration. But at the system
  level, that leaves them with fewer partners who can help with the
  business side of things. They had to become excellent in
  operations, strategy and sales, which they did as well.
 
  hinkley - 2 hours ago
  > Power management IC (surprising that Apple is doing Analog IC
  design too!)Have you seen the tear down of the old MacBook power
  bricks? Check it out if you haven?t.  There?s a lot of tech in
  there to improve efficiency (ie keep that tiny brick from
  melting)
 
    devonkim - 1 hours ago
    And despite all that engineering their reliability was terrible
    due to various plug design problems with the predecessor to
    MagSafe or the cords getting damaged from point stress.
    Meanwhile, Dell and HP make mediocre stuff that somehow hardly
    has such a problem by using much thicker gauge wiring and
    tougher rubber / plastics.
 
      tinus_hn - 14 minutes ago
      Dell power supplies, cables, receptacles and batteries fail
      all the time and I've seen the docking station connectors
      burn from shorts.
 
    cjsuk - 1 hours ago
    They?re shit. The inrush current is so high it actually damages
    the plugs with arcing!
 
      abritinthebay - 1 hours ago
      You're describing the cheap Chinese made knock-offs. They
      look almost perfectly identical and generally you can only
      tell by opening them up.They're awful. There are a LOT of
      teardowns of those. It's scary.
 
        robin_reala - 1 hours ago
        I bought a MacBook on eBay that came with a fake charger.
        Had to threaten to report them before they sent me a real
        one.
 
      artursapek - 1 hours ago
      You must have bought yours on Amazon :)
 
  pjc50 - 2 hours ago
  There's a lot to be said for "if you want something done
  properly, do it yourself". Hard to do in a connected ecosystem
  but Apple has the level of platform control that they can do
  whatever they feel they need to do without having to consider
  partners, competitors or exogenous forces.
 
  gehsty - 2 hours ago
  I think Apple explicitly position themselves as the combination
  of hardware and software and want as much vertical integration as
  possible... the more hardware they control the better they can
  make software to run on it.
 
  Illniyar - 2 hours ago
  "Axiom in the tech world is that "Apple is a software company
  that builds hardware". "Is that really a common belief? I know
  many people who think the opposite - apple is a hardware
  company.In fact Tim Cook went out of his way several times to
  remind people that apple isn't a hardware company.
 
    gurkendoktor - 1 hours ago
    In terms of profits, yes.But many of us don't buy Apple for the
    hardware, but because we want to stay in their software
    ecosystem. I'd rather use a Nexus running iOS than an iPhone X
    running Android, and I'm even more invested in macOS. That
    Apple builds nice hardware is a bonus for me (but I'd honestly
    prefer better software right now).I mean, on paper Apple is
    making more money from hardware than from software, but how do
    you measure hardware sales that only happened because of the
    software?
 
      selectodude - 1 hours ago
      Apple has been very serious about how they?re a hardware
      company vs a software company for like 30+ years now.
      Literally the first thing SPJ did after coming back was kill
      the Mac clones program. They?re obsessed with the feel of the
      hardware in every way. The software is just a platform.
 
        DRW_ - 1 hours ago
        Actually, Steve Jobs emphasised a few times that the reason
        why Apple was successful is because of the
        software.https://youtu.be/dEeyaAUCyZs
 
          godzillabrennus - 32 minutes ago
          Judging from how bad the software is getting I?d wager
          they forgot this.
 
          DRW_ - 10 minutes ago
          Yeah, I'd agree unfortunately.
 
          jrs95 - moments ago
          At least it's not Windows. I'm amazed at how something as
          basic as Bluetooth has been completely fucked for me
          since I got a PC. On no other platform have my Bose
          QC35s, AirPods, or wireless Logitech headset had issues.
          On Windows 10, they hardly work at all. Ironically the
          only device that works for longer than a few seconds
          before losing audio is my AirPods, which I still have to
          reconnect frequently to get the audio o actually come
          through.
 
          thevardanian - 29 minutes ago
          They're successful because of the software only because
          the hardware is ancillary to their software ecosystem.
          Their hardware makes their software run much more
          effectively than most of their competitors, and therefore
          acts as a major barrier to entry. I don't think there's a
          single tech company more completely integrated and whole
          than Apple. That's why they can emphasize on experience
          rather than just specs as they're selling more than just
          software, or hardware.
 
    DigitalJack - 1 hours ago
    "Is that really a common belief?"It was in the pre-iphone era.
 
    hyperbovine - 1 hours ago
    The axiom is that people will sit around debating which is the
    correct axiom on tech boards ad infinitum.
 
      yndoendo - 2 minutes ago
      Apple is tuple(Hardware,Software) = product. So simply a
      product company.
 
    austenallred - 1 hours ago
    I see it as the reverse. Apple is definitely a hardware company
    that makes a solid OS and generally makes mediocre software
    outside of that
 
      valuearb - 1 hours ago
      Yea, but that OS is everything. They barely make any software
      outside of it. And it's the best mobile OS by far.
 
        computerex - 42 minutes ago
        > And it's the best mobile OS by far.And yet Android
        dominates the market share. I don't think iOS is the best
        mobile OS, let alone the best by far.
 
          shorsher - 8 minutes ago
          I don't think Android market share is enough of a metric
          to determine the quality of iOS.  There are so many
          different cheap android phones to choose from, and people
          do not buy them because Android is a better mobile OS.
 
  rufugee - 1 hours ago
  Typing this from a Pixel 2 XL after having been a happy Pixel XL
  owner. The 2 is truly the greatest phone I've ever owned, and
  that includes iphones along the way. If this is what you get with
  a software company building hardware, I'd say keep it up.
 
    enraged_camel - 15 minutes ago
    Once again, anecdotal evidence is not data.We have confirmed
    reports that Pixel 2's build quality is...
    questionable:https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/10/google-is-
    investigat...
 
    microcolonel - 47 minutes ago
    If iPhones ran today's Android, they would lead the pack; but
    because they run iOS, they're pretty MOR in terms of everyday
    performance and responsiveness (and perhaps especially
    disappointing WRT battery life). This is quite a role reversal
    from the situation five years ago.
 
pat2man - 3 hours ago
Amazing to see everything shrink (except for the battery). Reminds
me of a quote referencing Blackberry falling behind the iPhone:
"Imagine their surprise when they disassembled an iPhone for the
first time and found that the phone was battery with a tiny logic
board strapped to it."https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2043613
 
  joering2 - 2 hours ago
  The new concept seems to be dual-battery.I'm sure they
  investigated designing simply L-shaped battery but for some
  reason they decided to go with two batteries instead.I wonder if
  its because one is supplying power to some critical circuits
  while other one isn't, or since display and battery are #1s
  replacement on these phones, they simply run some stats and
  decided that splitting cells into two separate battery boxes will
  help them cut the costs down the line when it will come to
  battery replacement.
 
    Qworg - 2 hours ago
    Manufacturing costs are the most likely reason.  Prismatic
    cells are much less costly to produce in a rectangular format
    vs. an L shape.
 
      joering2 - 1 hours ago
      I don't know, but putting 4 cells into one box, versus 2
      cells in 2 boxes at the iPhone scale might be more
      expensive.My take is that still less expensive that constant
      replacement (warranty, recalls) that they do on daily basis.
 
        snewk - 1 hours ago
        it could be related to power draw inconsistencies in cells
        with concave angles
 
mavhc - 3 hours ago
iPhone X(Box) 2013:
https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Xbox+One+Kinect+Teardown/197...
2017:
https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/iPhone+X+Teardown/98975?revi...
 
  skeletonjelly - 1 hours ago
  FWIW this is v2 of the Kinect, the X teardown mentions Primesense
  was bought after v1 came out.
 
  [deleted]
 
djrogers - 3 hours ago
I gotta say, that is a beautiful device!