GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-03) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Fifty-three year old nuclear missile accident revealed
250 points by tomohawk
http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/communities/belle_fourche...
___________________________________________________________________
 
rrggrr - 5 hours ago
This is why nuclear non-proliferation is important. Its difficult
enough for a super power to safely store and control its WMD. Each
new nuclear state magnifies the risks, and all the more so because
they lack the after action experience that a half century of
mishaps delivers.
 
  iaw - 4 hours ago
  Of the broken arrow incidents I'm aware of this was one of the
  least dangerous in terms of detonation threat.> Its difficult
  enough for a super power to safely store and control its
  WMD.There has never been an accidental detonation of a nuclear
  device.  The problem this article describes was one in rocketry,
  insulation, and adherence to protocols.Nuclear non-proliferation
  is important, but this article is not the reason why.  The reason
  non-proliferation is important is because of the ramifications of
  using the devices, not challenges in storing them.
 
    7952 - 2 hours ago
    But these devices always exist as one part of a wider technical
    and human system.  It seems unwise to separate the two when
    safety could be comprised by a failure in any part of the
    system.
 
  joshlegs - 5 hours ago
  I don't disagree that nuclear non-proliferation is important. But
  I think the arguments you're using are kind of a bit of false
  logic. Essentially your argument boils down to "this thing X is
  hard to do safely. Therefore only people who have done X should
  do it [because they've failed a lot of times before]." And I
  don't think that is a legitimate argument for any topic, really.
 
    keiferski - 5 hours ago
    This is completely a valid argument when the "learning
    mistakes" of X have disastrous consequences.
 
      [deleted]
 
  vkou - 5 hours ago
  Arms reduction is even more important. I'd rather live in a world
  where 20 countries have 50 warheads each, then one where two
  countries have 4,000 warheads each.A weapon detonating by
  accident is terrible. Thousands of weapons on hair-trigger alert
  is civilization-ending. It's absolutely insane that we're
  conditioned to believe that this is not only normal - but the
  best possible state of affairs.
 
    drzaiusapelord - 5 hours ago
    >I'd rather live in a world where 20 countries have 50 warheads
    each, then one where two countries have 4,000 warheads each.Now
    instead of two political leaders to worry about, you have 20.
    Not sure if that's what you really want.
 
      nrb - 4 hours ago
      Political leaders are far from the biggest worry compared to
      command and control of their vast nuclear arsenals. More eyes
      on less weapons mitigates that. After all, several nuclear
      weapons have gone missing by the US and several dozen are
      believed to have gone missing in the Soviet Union.
 
    nawgszy - 5 hours ago
    I don't really think that we believe either of those things; it
    seems a lot has been written on how MAD is a rather poor
    sentiment to rest our future upon.But all that aside, 20
    countries each having 50 warheads seems a lot likelier to end
    up with 20 countries each having thousands of warheads than 2
    countries having thousands of warheads and everyone else none
    does, no?
 
    clarkmoody - 5 hours ago
    Wouldn't you rather live in a world where all governments had
    zero nuclear weapons each?A nuclear bomb serves no other
    purpose than killing huge numbers of civilians in a short
    period of time. Shouldn't we strive for a world where nobody
    has that capability? Not to mention that in the United States,
    one man has unilateral and final authority to launch a nuclear
    first strike.Edit: countries -> governments
 
      jtmarmon - 5 hours ago
      Yes, I would. Please sign me up when you figure out how to do
      this
 
      solotronics - 3 hours ago
      actually they can be very useful as well but they have a
      public image problemhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Plo
      wshareartifical lakes, mining, terraforming, diverting
      asteroids, propulsion for extremely large spaceships,
      fighting intergalactic invaders etc.
 
      mantas - 4 hours ago
      The main purpose of nuclear bomb is to deter nuclear attack
      by ensuring MAD. We should strive for a world where nobody
      has a chance to use nuclear bomb. And, currently, a handful
      of countries having them is the best way to ensure that.If
      all countries claim to destroy their nuclear bombs and never
      ever make a new one, would you trust all of them?
 
        vkou - 4 hours ago
        > The main purpose of nuclear bomb is to deter nuclear
        attack by ensuring MAD. We should strive for a world where
        nobody has a chance to use nuclear bomb. And, currently, a
        handful of countries having them is the best way to ensure
        that.Why is a handful of countries having nuclear bombs the
        best way to ensure that? Why not two dozen countries having
        nuclear bombs? Neither Ukraine nor Iraq would have been
        invaded if they were nuclear-armed.It's incredibly self-
        serving of nuclear powers to claim that they can have these
        weapons, because they will be responsible with them, but
        nobody else can. (And then they go ahead and start wars.)
 
          mantas - 2 hours ago
          I don't see much difference between handful and a dozen
          or two. Or maybe my English as second language is failing
          me..It'd be definitely interesting to see Ukraine and
          Iraq conflicts unfold while they had nuclear weapons. I'd
          be all for giving nuclear weapons to every single country
          if that'd stop wars in the future. But I'm afraid some
          asshats would start blackmailing others and those would
          bend over. And we'd be back at square 1.
 
          TheOtherHobbes - 2 hours ago
          Because superpowers are more likely to fight proxy wars
          or use indirect methods, while smaller countries are more
          likely to fight with real boots on real territory
          supported by real explosions.The reality is that if a
          superpower wanted to launch a sneak nuclear attack on
          another superpower, it could be done to great effect
          without missiles or bombers, and without necessarily
          giving away the identity of the aggressor.The fact that
          it hasn't been done either suggests lack of imagination
          or lack of willingness - or perhaps both.As for small
          countries - it's debatable if nukes would have saved Iraq
          or the Ukraine, because any small country using nukes on
          a superpower is likely to do more damage to itself than
          the superpower.But this is largely a sideshow in 2017. As
          we're currently discovering, infowar and weaponised
          social media are a much cheaper and more efficient way to
          wage proxy war than nukes or terrorism are.Nukes are
          almost obsolete now that it's so ridiculously easy to
          persuade a country to destroy its own political stability
          and self-confidence with covert funding of fringe
          extremism, supported by weaponised social media.And if
          that's not enough to do the job, direct hacking of
          infrastructure remains an option.The West is well behind
          the curve on defending against both. As and when the next
          war starts - if it hasn't already - the reliance on nukes
          as a deterrent is going to become one of those "And this
          is what they were doing on until the new reality hit"
          chapters in future history books.
 
        clarkmoody - 3 hours ago
        > And, currently, a handful of [governments] having them is
        the best way to ensure that.Until it isn't. But then it's
        too late to try anything different.> If all [governments]
        claim to destroy their nuclear bombs and never ever make a
        new one, would you trust all of them?I don't trust
        statements from governments, as a general rule.
 
          mantas - 2 hours ago
          > Until it isn't. But then it's too late to try anything
          different.We had that for a brief period of time. US was
          the only one with the nuclear bomb. Would they have used
          it on Japan if they had a chance to retaliate?> I don't
          trust statements from governments, as a general rule.I
          guess we agree governmental disarmament agreements
          wouldn't work..
 
    notheguyouthink - 5 hours ago
    What's the realistic approach to this though? I don't know
    anything about this area, but to me it seems like hoping for 20
    countries having 50 each would be effectively the same as
    hoping for 20 countries having 0 each.That is to say, we're in
    the arms race because each country did have N each. But then
    one country had N+1, and so the others raced for N+2, and so
    on. If we hoped for 50 each, wouldn't it drop back to the same
    pattern, and someone would become 50+1?Note that 4,000 of
    course doesn't solve the N+1 issue, but my point is if you're
    going to aim for 50 - I'm not sure what problems it solves. May
    as well shoot for 0, no? 0 seems equally impossible to me as
    50, but at least it solves a single problem.. nukes, in
    general.
 
      raquo - 5 hours ago
      You can't just un-invent nukes. They're there, they provide
      nuclear deterrence. They will continue to exist no matter how
      many countries "agree" to stop using them. Regardless of
      whether you have them, there is always a chance that someone
      might still keep the nukes in secret despite what they agreed
      to. No one would want such a risk if they have an option to
      avoid it.
 
        notheguyouthink - 3 hours ago
        Oh I agree completely, but that's sort of my point.The OP's
        solution seemed to be making everyone have 50 instead of
        4,000. That seemed both impossible, and a weird goal. If
        you're going to try for the impossible, shouldn't we aim
        for 0?I don't ever see us stopping N+1 nukes though.
 
    ars - 5 hours ago
    > I'd rather live in a world where 20 countries have 50
    warheads each, then one where two countries have 4,000 warheads
    each.I absolutely would not. Those 2 countries know far more
    about the process then those other countries, and they have the
    budget to do it right. You would have to duplicate labs, and
    computers, and other efforts 20 times in your scenario, and
    each of those labs will not be as good as the 2 higher funded
    ones.> A weapon detonating by accident is terrible. Thousands
    of weapons on hair-trigger alert is civilization-ending.Look at
    it from a fear point of view: No one will detonate a thousand
    weapons unless they are declaring total war. So all one needs
    to do is read global moods and see if total war is likely (it's
    not). (i.e. war might happen, but not total war)An accident on
    the other hand can happen randomly, you would be permanently
    and constantly worried about one.
 
      lostlogin - 4 hours ago
      Who are the two countries you speak of? There have been some
      pretty spectacular accidents due to underfunding and poor
      performance in superpowers.
 
      rflrob - 4 hours ago
      > No one will detonate a thousand weapons unless they are
      declaring total war.Or if they believe (rightly or wrongly)
      that the other nuclear power has declared total war. There's
      been a number of false alarms that have been successfully
      ignored, but what if one of those false alarms came during
      the Cuban missile crisis or immediately after the invasion of
      Afghanistan?
 
      vkou - 4 hours ago
      > I absolutely would not. Those 2 countries know far more
      about the process then those other countries, and they have
      the budget to do it right. You would have to duplicate labs,
      and computers, and other efforts 20 times in your scenario,
      and each of those labs will not be as good as the 2 higher
      funded ones.If your goal is maintaining an arsenal of world-
      ending weapons cheaply, sure. I am not trying to optimize for
      that use case.> No one will detonate a thousand weapons
      unless they are declaring total war.Or they think that the
      other side declared total war. Or they are engaged in a
      small-scale conventional war, and are afraid the other side
      will escalate. Or they are escalating, by using tactical
      weapons, and the other side retaliates with strategical
      weapons. (Spoilers: Russia has made it very clear that it
      will use tactical nuclear weapons, against military targets,
      in an otherwise conventional conflict.) Or there's an
      intelligence failure, and they believe that they are the
      target of a sneak attack.All of these are incredibly
      plausible ways for a nuclear war to start.
 
      hitekker - 3 hours ago
      Agreed.In this vein, Politico noted six years ago:>I talked
      with the president at one of those fundraisers some months
      back, and I asked him, "What keeps you up at night?" > And he
      said, "Everything. Everything that gets to my desk is a
      critical mass. If it gets to my desk, then no one else could
      have handled it." So I said, "So what's the one that keeps
      you up at night?" > He goes, "There are quite a few." > So I
      go, "What's the one? Period." > And he says, "Pakistan." > I
      get that: There's the question of whether Zardari's
      government is actually in control, or whether the military
      is. And how close the Taliban, or Al Qaeda, or whoever else
      is to having their hands on real weapons of mass destruction.
      It's the closest government there is to allowing those
      weapons to either be used or sold to places that we really
      wouldn't like to have those weapons. That's a concern for all
      of us.One bad actor ruins the game.
 
      taurath - 5 hours ago
      Major conflicts only happen in non nuclear states. In all
      honesty I?ll bet that?s what has kept India and Pakistan from
      a war.
 
        lostlogin - 4 hours ago
        How do you define a major conflict? Iraq seemed pretty big,
        and so did Afghanistan.
 
          a_t48 - 4 hours ago
          The draft wasn't invoked, so there's that.
 
          aidenn0 - 4 hours ago
          Those didn't happen in nuclear states.
 
        exhilaration - 4 hours ago
        Ahem... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo-
        Pakistani_wars_and_confli...
 
          greedo - 4 hours ago
          And since both countries now have nukes, the chances of a
          conventional conflict seem much lower.
 
pwaai - 2 hours ago
Incidents like this shows us that things will inevitably go wrong
with increasing frequency and gravity.Furthermore, I fear regional
conflicts involving mass scale conventional face-off (ex. dmz) are
converting to a low operating cost high risk situations in the form
of mutually assured destruction.East Asia is venturing into a
potential double whammy of naval and nuclear arms race--smaller
countries like South Korea are entering a phase of normalization
for nuclear armament with pressure mounting from the public to have
a deterrence and a back up plan yet cannot have land based missile
silo's, instead relying on nuclear submarines that will host the
IRBMs. The cost is much higher than the "previous generation", as
smaller countries will most certainly be decimated, land based
silos do not make sense.
 
le-mark - 5 hours ago
There's a LOT of cold war history up there in the central plains.
The Strategic Air Command museum just outside of Omaha Nebraska has
really incredible displays and a surprisingly large aircraft
collection (to me at least). Including an SR-71. Highly recommended
for anyone interested in that kind of thing.http://sacmuseum.org/
 
knappe - 4 hours ago
I recently finished Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the
Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety [0].  I can't
recommend the book enough for how eye opening it really is into how
blas? we have been with nuclear weapons.We've been reckless and by
all accounts it is a miracle we haven't had a serious accident
(there have been a few, just not on our own soil).  The number of
close calls is just astounding.Further the book, at one point,
talks about America's position on Russia and the attempts to keep
them from getting "the bomb".  It is exactly what has played out
and will continue to play out with North Korea and Iran.  History
is repeating itself and we sure haven't learned from it.[0]
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00C5R7F8G/
 
  valuearb - 2 hours ago
  Have we been reckless?We've never had a serious accident. So
  maybe it's not luck, maybe there are a lot of controls that
  actually work well.
 
    dboreham - 1 hours ago
    In recent times, perhaps. But if you read the literature on the
    accidents and incidents that have occurred -- it is definitely
    due to luck.
 
      fokinsean - 1 hours ago
      This one was also extremely
      close.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_Goldsboro_B-
      52_crash3 of the 4 arming mechanisms activated. I would say
      it's a combination of good luck and good controls :)
 
  fokinsean - 4 hours ago
  Thanks, you just reminded me about this book. Gonna pick it up
  this weekend!Lately I have been feeling very anxious about the
  North Korea situation, but for some reason reading about nuclear
  accidents, close-calls, stories, etc. calms me in a morbid way.I
  guess it has to do with "facing your fears" or something like
  that.
 
  gedy - 15 minutes ago
  > We've been recklessI worked around nuclear weapon systems and
  TBH came away with the opposite impression.  I grew up terrified
  of the military and panic mongering about of "THE BOMBS!" from
  family, media, etc.  But after this, I ironically came away
  feeling much safer seeing how professional and serious people
  took their jobs.
 
    knappe - 9 minutes ago
    I'd be curious what your takeaway is from the book.At one point
    one of the regulators in the Safety Commission stopped
    receiving reports about accidents because the Air Force knew
    that this would be used as ammunition to fix the Titan II
    safety issues that had been in place for decades.
 
  abandonliberty - 4 hours ago
  Hey it's not all bad, we managed to convince Ukraine to destroy
  their nuclear weapons and it worked out really well for them.http
  s://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budapest_Memorandum_on_Securit...
 
    batter - 3 hours ago
    It worked so 'well' that it lost part of it's territory. From
    Budapest Memorandum Wiki: 'The memorandum included security
    assurances against threats or use of force against the
    territorial integrity or political independence of Ukraine,
    Belarus and Kazakhstan.' Now it will be a lesson for others:
    nukes are way more reliable than some piece of paper, which no
    one is gonna follow: http://www.dw.com/en/ukraines-forgotten-
    security-guarantee-t...
 
      abandonliberty - 2 hours ago
      Yes, I was being facetious.However, some are arguing that
      this view is incorrect - there's a paper linked on the
      wikipedia page.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_weapons_
      and_Ukraine#De...
 
      hangonhn - 3 hours ago
      "Now it will be a lesson for others: nukes are way more
      reliable than some piece of paper, which no one is gonna
      follow"Is it really though? Even if Ukraine had nukes, would
      it have threatened and actually have the will to use it over
      the lost of the Crimea?  The conflict was low intensity
      warfare, which nukes are not particularly well suited for.  I
      don't think nukes are the be-all-end-all weapons people think
      they are.  There are huge consequences to using them,
      especially against another nuclear power.
 
        dragonwriter - 2 hours ago
        > Even if Ukraine had nukes, would it have threatened and
        actually have the will to use it over the lost of the
        Crimea?Over a conventional invasion by a neighboring
        nation-state with massive conventional superiority with a
        paper-thin cover story?Probably. I mean, that?s why the
        USSR didn't pull that stunt against any of the NATO
        countries bordering its satellites, ever, even though they
        did similar things to other neighbors. And those bordering
        states were merely allies of the nuclear powers, not
        nuclear powers themselves.
 
          pvg - 39 minutes ago
          "Nation-state" is not another way to say "country". The
          Russian federation, for instance, isn't a nation state.
 
        googletazer - 3 hours ago
        They couldn't launch them anyway, its the same as US nukes
        in Turkey.
 
        greedy_buffer - 3 hours ago
        > The conflict was low intensity warfare, which nukes are
        not particularly well suited for.Firstly "was" is not the
        right word, the war is ongoing:
        http://tass.com/world/965974Secondly, imo the nature of the
        conflict is less important than whether a concentrated
        population of the adversary's citizens are within range of
        the weapon as far as determining the effectiveness of
        nuclear deterrent.> Even if Ukraine had nukes, would it
        have threatened and actually have the will to use it over
        the lost of the Crimea?Would those that made the decision
        to invade have accepted the risk of even the most minute
        possibility? No leader has done that so far.
 
    nyolfen - 3 hours ago
    not to mention gaddafi
 
      hangonhn - 3 hours ago
      Nuclear weapons wouldn't have help Gaddafi anyways.  He
      didn't have a working weapon nor a reliable way to delivering
      it.  Also, what was he going to do with one?  Threaten the US
      with one if the internal rebellions don't stop?  Threaten to
      nuke his own people?There's an illusion of the utility of
      nuclear weapons.  Nuclear weapons might be OK if you want to
      destroy masses of conventional armies or destroy the ability
      of an enemy fighting a heavily industrialized conventional
      form of war.  Unless the destructive power of nukes fit into
      your overall strategy, it's better not to have them or waste
      the resources developing them (along with the risk of
      sanctions, etc.)
 
        Xixi - 3 hours ago
        Had Gaddafi developed a working nuclear bomb with the
        necessary delivery mechanism, would France/UK/US have
        launched a campaign that ultimately ended with his death?
        We will never know, only speculate, but North Korea is
        betting that the answer to this question is "no".
 
          aduitsis - 2 hours ago
          Here's a long but interesting
          read:https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/09/18/the-
          risk-of-nu...The answer you are referring to is
          explicitly mentioned.
 
          AnimalMuppet - 3 hours ago
          On the other hand, the US didn't launch a campaign that
          ended in the NK ruler's death before they had nukes,
          either...
 
          Xixi - 3 hours ago
          Quite true. Though western countries didn't attack
          Gaddafi before he gave up nuke either.The speculation
          I've heard (on radio, so I cannot paste a link) is that
          NK analysis is roughly: NK's regime is safe as long as
          China sees it as useful (probably using NK as some sort
          of buffer state against US), but sooner or later that
          support will end. Then only nuclear weapons will ensure
          NK's regime survival. It's rational, though again just
          speculation.The contradiction, or maybe unintended side
          effect, is that the developing of nuclear weapons itself
          is causing China to rethink its support of NK regime...
 
          hangonhn - 2 hours ago
          Not saying the hypothesis you put forward is wrong but
          I've heard a very convincing complementary one:Kim's
          goals are:1. Survival of the Kim leadership 2.
          Reunification of KoreaTo achieve the latter (and also the
          prior), he needs to remove the US from intervening in any
          conflict on the Korean peninsula.  If he had a credible
          threat to any major US city, then the US would have to
          weight the freedom of S. Korea vs. the lives of hundreds
          of thousands of Americans.
 
        nyolfen - 3 hours ago
        >Also, what was he going to do with one? Threaten the US
        with one if the internal rebellions don't stop? Threaten to
        nuke his own people?prevent the US from
        intervening/preventing him from putting down internal
        rebellions. the risk of nuclear escalation gives you a much
        greater license to do things that fly in the face of
        international conventions.
 
  tzs - 2 hours ago
  > Further the book, at one point, talks about America's position
  on Russia and the attempts to keep them from getting "the bomb".
  It is exactly what has played out and will continue to play out
  with North Korea and Iran. History is repeating itself and we
  sure haven't learned from it.Is it actually similar, though?The
  US got the bomb in 1945.The Russians got theirs in 1949.Given the
  size of the Soviet Union, how far it is from the United States,
  the available spying and reconnaissance technology (no
  satellites, no stealth aircraft), and that the US was only four
  years out of World War II, I don't think there is any way the US
  could have made a creditable threat to use military force to stop
  the Russians.Also, China and Russia were still on good terms back
  then. China might not have stayed out of it if the US attacked
  their ally and neighbor.Compare to North Korea and Iran. In both
  cases the US can make a creditable military threat. From a purely
  military point of view, the US could easily wipe either (or both)
  of them out.Furthermore, neither has any powerful allies who want
  them to get nukes.With North Korea, their only powerful ally is
  China and I don't think China actually cares if North Korea gets
  destroyed as long as (1) it doesn't send a lot of refugees across
  the Chinese border, and (2) whatever replaces it continues to
  function as a buffer zone between them and South Korea because
  they do not want a US ally right on their border.
 
    scrumper - 1 hours ago
    That?s not quite an accurate read though, at least as far as
    NK. The US can?t really make a credible military threat because
    of the north?s proximity to the south, an important US ally and
    a country all but guaranteed to be mortally wounded in the
    event of north/USA hostilities.
 
      marcoperaza - 1 hours ago
      Sure we can. We have the capability to totally annihilate as
      much of North Korea as we need in order to prevent a counter
      attack. The question is if we are willing to do it, and kill
      millions of North Korean civilians. Trump is sure trying to
      convince the North Koreans that he is.
 
        PostOnce - 17 minutes ago
        > We have the capability to annihilate as much of NK as we
        need to prevent a counterattack...from North KoreaIf we
        start launching nukes in the direction of NK, how does
        China know it's going to stop in NK and not hit them? Do we
        call them up first? Then what do they say?Is it totally out
        of the question that China would panic (or reason?) and
        counterattack? NK doesn't exist in a vacuum, and in fact NK
        wouldn't exist at all today had China not intervened in the
        last war.
 
        kbenson - 43 minutes ago
        From missile launch to missile detonation is enough time
        for NK to shell large chunks of high population areas of
        SK. They have the guns already pointed and ready for
        exactly this reason.
 
          dogma1138 - 12 minutes ago
          You assuming that NK has an early warning system which
          consists of more than a guy with binoculars and circa
          1960s radar which they don?t.The US is more than capable
          of launching a preemptive strike against NK without Seoul
          being hit nearly as hard as one would think.The main
          reason they won?t isn?t the shelling of Seoul is that
          China won?t allow US troops on its border and neither the
          US, SK nor China wants to deal with the fallout of having
          to care for millions of uneducated by modern standards
          starving people that believe in unicorns.The flood of
          refugees into SK would do much more damage than any
          possible shelling from NK which is also why neither
          player has pushed for critically destabilizing measures
          or a regime change for the past 50 years.
 
          hutzlibu - 34 minutes ago
          And Seoul is still very close to the border ... bad with
          artillery allready, worse with possible nuclear shelling.
 
    cat199 - 1 hours ago
    > Given the size of the Soviet Union, how far it is from the
    United States, the available spying and reconnaissance
    technology (no satellites, no stealth aircraft), and that the
    US was only four years out of World War II, I don't think there
    is any way the US could have made a creditable threat to use
    military force to stop the Russians.That whole 'massive
    military presence in western europe and asia minor' thing
    notwithstanding of couse..
 
slezakattack - 3 hours ago
I found that the side-story as to how they even got this story was
pretty fascinating:
http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/revealing-a--year-old...
 
tomcatv - 2 hours ago
That sounds pleasant
 
thrillgore - 53 minutes ago
This article didn't seem like that much of an incident. The warhead
didn't fire, at least. SL-1 is more of what I would think would be
a real .mil-sector nuclear accident.
 
jacquesm - 3 hours ago
This article sounds like a recruitment effort.
 
nerdponx - 6 hours ago
Hicks said the metal of the screwdriver contacted the positive side
of the fuse and also the fuse?s grounded metal holder, causing a
short circuit that sent electricity flowing to unintended places.Is
there some company out there making non-conductive screwdrivers
designed for electrical work? I can understand that maybe the
materials science to make strong plastic screwdrivers didn't exist
in the 1950s, but surely they exist today, right?
 
  Animats - 4 hours ago
  He was supposed to be using a fuse puller, but he didn't have
  one. This is a fuse puller.[1]  It's a pair of pliers made from
  nylon. Before good plastics, they were made of hardwood.[2]
  Standard electrician tool for a century.[1]
  https://www.jensentools.com/gc-waldom-9356-fuse-puller-molde...
  [2] https://www.etsystudio.com/listing/552201603/antique-
  wooden-...
 
  gebeeson - 5 hours ago
  Absolutely. And when dealing with nuclear weapons (i.e. Specials)
  they are the only tools authorized. Nylon and the like.
 
  GCU-Empiricist - 5 hours ago
  The proper tool is a fuse puller not a screwdriver.  These days
  similar maintenance evolutions are heavily controlled operation
  performed under reader/worker controls.
 
  planteen - 6 hours ago
  Oh yeah they exist. There are ceramic ones and I have also seen
  plastic ones.I've seen other fun specialized types of
  screwdrivers in my career:Screwdrivers with conductive plastic in
  the handle, to deal with ESD requirements in the spacecraft
  industry. Alternatively, take a normal plastic screwdriver handle
  and wrap it in copper tape.Beryllium screwdrivers (non-ferrous)
  for use around MRI machine bores thanks to the insane magnetic
  fields. You also have to wear ceramic hard-toed shoes.
 
    saagarjha - 5 hours ago
    Wait, isn?t Beryllium toxic? I was under the impression that
    you don?t want to be around it.
 
      dsfyu404ed - 5 hours ago
      The alloy form used for tools is only hazardous in powdered
      formIt's fine to machine as long as you're making actual
      chips (how do you think they make all those tools for the oil
      industry).
 
        hinkley - 2 hours ago
        If I had to guess I would have said CNC equipment in an oil
        bath...
 
      scrooched_moose - 5 hours ago
      It's mostly an inhalation risk. You definitely don't want to
      be around the manufacture of it without serious PPE, but
      touching a screwdriver should be fine. Just don't take it to
      a grinding wheel.I'd guess anyone working on an MRI machine
      is wearing gloves anyway for other reasons.
 
        lostlogin - 4 hours ago
        Have watched a few engineers work on MR scanners - no
        gloves unless dealing with helium.
 
      katastic - 5 hours ago
      Didn't you mother ever tell you to stop putting things in
      your mouth?Also, it's used in dental alloys. It seems it's
      only toxic if you inhale its dust.Fun fact: Your body has no
      way to remove it from your body, so you accumulate it
      forever.
 
        0xfeba - 5 hours ago
        Same problem as lead, IIRC.
 
          lostlogin - 4 hours ago
          surprisingly it is similar for iron too, luckily we can
          bleed.
 
        sliverstorm - 5 hours ago
        Sounds like a candidate for chelation.
 
      planteen - 5 hours ago
      Yes, beryllium is very nasty. You don't ever want to breathe
      its dust, so don't machine/cut/grind it ever. There are
      usually warning symbols on things containing it. But it has
      applications so it gets used.For example, it is used in
      spacecraft to save weight over aluminum. When I worked with
      MRI machines, we used FETs with beryllium oxide ceramic (BeO)
      backing. BeO is an amazing thermal conductor, electrical
      insulator (only diamond is better).
 
        lostlogin - 4 hours ago
        Titanium tools are useful for high field magnets. They look
        awesome and cost a lot.
 
      lostapathy - 5 hours ago
      Beryllium disease is a big issue, and the US DOE makes a good
      show of taking it seriously, see https://energy.gov/ehss
      /chronic-beryllium-disease-prevention...Unfortunately tons of
      people were exposed before the risks were at all understood
      and the health effects can be pretty bad.
 
    aptwebapps - 5 hours ago
    And steel sheathed with plastic. The end still conducts, but
    that's not usually a problem.
 
      fhood - 5 hours ago
      At a company I used to work for we used to get a set of these
      every time we made a bulk order. But the company was just
      four people and we made those orders 3 or 4 times a year, so
      eventually we were basically drowning in very well insulated
      hand tools.
 
  lostapathy - 5 hours ago
  Yes, tons of options https://www.kctoolco.com/insulated-tools/
 
    Justin_K - 5 hours ago
    Insulated tools won't prevent a short from a metal tipped tool.
    The operator should have used a plastic fuse puller.
 
leeoniya - 6 hours ago
oh, and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_Goldsboro_B-52_crash"The
two 3?4-megaton MK. 39 nuclear bombs separated from the gyrating
aircraft as it broke up between 1,000 and 2,000 feet (300 and 610
m)."For reference, Little Boy's (Hiroshima) yield was 15 kilotons.
 
  gilleain - 6 hours ago
  Using the nukemap, with a target of Faro:http://nuclearsecrecy.co
  m/nukemap/?&kt=4000&lat=35.5111142&l...
 
    leeoniya - 5 hours ago
    the default there is airburst, but at Faro it would have
    detonated at the surface which reduces the radius a lot and
    casualties by a factor of 3, (prolly since less of densely-
    populated Goldsboro is affected)
 
      HarryHirsch - 4 hours ago
      But with a surface burst there would have been a fallout
      plume all the way to Norfolk, VA. The area would be
      uninhabitable for years, if not decades.
 
nikkig - 2 hours ago
It's amazing we've not had a major incident because of our
recklessness.
 
_Microft - 6 hours ago
There was a frightening number of close calls over the course of
decades on the american side alone. One can just assume what must
have happened on the sites of other nuclear powers that just
doesn't get reported.You can find a timeline of these almost
accidents here: https://futureoflife.org/background/nuclear-close-
calls-a-ti...It's certainly time to reduce the number of warheads
from a nuclear-winter-guaranteeing one to an at least nuclear-
deterrence-still-works-but-an-accident-is-terrible-but-no-longer-
civilization-ending one.
 
  gozur88 - 5 hours ago
  The incident in the article isn't a "close call".  There was
  never any danger the warhead would go off.
 
    retSava - 5 hours ago
    There have been many accidents, of a kind where even one is one
    too many. Given the potential damage, I certainly don't feel
    comfortable with your assessment that there wasn't any danger
    it would go off.Likely these things happen more often than is
    publicly known, yet we've not (yet) seen a full-on swiss cheese
    kind of accident.
 
      gozur88 - 12 minutes ago
      Nuclear bombs aren't like normal bombs.  You can burn them or
      blow them up with conventional explosives and they won't go
      off.
 
    HarryHirsch - 5 hours ago
    If the warhead had damaged the fuel tank there would have been
    an explosion, and the radioactive materials in the bomb would
    have been spread around the site. It would have looked like the
    Palomares explosion, and that was a mess:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1966_Palomares_B-52_crashThere
    was an incident (this one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1980_D
    amascus_Titan_missile_ex...) when a serviceman dropped a
    spanner while working on a missile. There was a fuel leak and
    an explosion, thankfully the warhead was thrown clear of the
    silo by the blast.
 
zedpm - 1 hours ago
If you happen to visit Badlands National Park, or western South
Dakota in general, make time to visit the Minuteman Missile
National Historic Site mentioned in the article. I toured Delta-01
last summer, and it was fascinating. The tour guide did a fantastic
job of conveying the gravity of the mission and just how scary the
Cold War was.
 
sandworm101 - 5 hours ago
>> without hitting the missile and causing an explosion. >> caused
a short circuit that resulted in an explosion. >> Luckily, the cone
did not do enough damage to the missile to cause the missile to
explode.To clarify: There was absolutely no chance at any point of
a nuclear explosion.  The article suggests that some big explosion
was on the edge of possibility which, given the context, one might
think would be a nuclear explosion.  The warhead, the "physics
package", was never really a worry.  Getting those to detonate
requires some careful triggering.This was also a SOLID fuel rocket.
While you wouldn't want to damage it, it wasn't full of the nasty
pressurized liquids of other missiles.  Getting its fuel to
actually ignite would require more than hitting it with a hammer.
You need something akin to a blasting cap.  Shuttle used something
more like a giant flamethrower.  The solid retro rockets were not
directly triggered by a the short circuit.  I'd bet good money that
their ignition system felt the short rather than the fuel being
ignited by the short.
 
  oconnor663 - 4 hours ago
  > This was also a SOLID fuel rocket.Oh cool, I was wondering why
  they didn't just defuel the rocket first thing.
 
  bjt2n3904 - 5 hours ago
  Not an aerospace engineer or anything. I think the fear was that
  the rocket may tip over and collapse under its own weight. I
  wouldn't be too surprised if that could trigger an ignition of
  the rocket fuel at the very least, risking nuclear
  contamination.While the physics package surely has numerous
  safeties, I'd be concerned that the safeties would be damaged in
  a way that no one could really predict after falling 80 feet.
  They served their purpose well, but you can bet all the engineers
  were in the lab for the next 72 hours straight looking for
  various failure modes.
 
    sandworm101 - 4 hours ago
    >> ...one could really predict after falling 80 feet.I'd say
    that deep within the archives is a report detailing exactly
    this scenario.  Drop testing of munitions is standard stuff.See
    https://www.rtc.army.mil/Resources/Capability%20Sheets/Insen...
 
    robryk - 4 hours ago
    Any damage to the warhead would likely make it impossible to
    have a nuclear reaction. In order to do that, the warhead would
    have to explode multiple precisely shaped conventional
    explosives with precise timing. If any one of them was
    deformed, nothing (apart from the small conventional explosion)
    would happen, even if all the safeguards incorrectly decided to
    explode the warhead.
 
      robotresearcher - 3 hours ago
      parent was concerned about> risking nuclear contamination.not
      a nuclear explosion. A conventional boom could spread
      radioactive materials all over.
 
        robryk - 3 hours ago
        EDIT: I was wrong. See the child for correction.There are
        no radioactive materials in the warhead. In other words:
        there are no materials that undergo radioactive decay. What
        is in there are fissile materials: ie. materials that emit
        neutrons upon being irradiated with neutrons.The only way
        the warhead might become radioactive is if it partially
        detonated.
 
          rrmm - 3 hours ago
          Pu-239 is radioactive no?  Along with impurities like
          Pu-240 which are slightly more radioactive.
 
          robryk - 3 hours ago
          Thanks, I stand corrected. For some reason I was
          considering Uranium only (which also decays, but with
          such a long half-life).
 
          [deleted]
 
  dsfyu404ed - 5 hours ago
  > There was absolutely no chance at any point of a nuclear
  explosionExactly.  Even if the conventional primer went off it's
  not gonna cause a create the conditions necessary for fission
  because it wasn't set off by the detonator.
 
    lostlogin - 4 hours ago
    There have been other accidents where multistage fail safes
    failed at multiple stages. I?d stand back.
 
  cmurf - 4 hours ago
  That's a big part of Command and Control, the farther back in
  time you go, the greater the likelihood the design of the warhead
  was not one point safe and it wasn't at all assured that it'd
  take careful triggering to get a full or partial nuclear
  explosion. A decent chunk of later nuclear tests were to help
  make bombs one point safe. But even then, it there were
  absolutely rudimentary fail safes that basically worked on the
  honor system, for well over a decade.Anyway you still have a mess
  on your hand if the explosives detonate but there's no chain
  reaction.
 
skellertor - 5 hours ago
?I wasn?t there,? Smith said of the explosion, ?but I know there
were two technicians who ruined their underwear. 'Cause that ain?t
supposed to happen.?Best line of the story. I'm curious how close
we've been to nuclear annihilation and we had no idea.
 
  leeter - 4 hours ago
  As bad as this story may seem... it's nothing to the Demascus
  Titan Explosion... that really could have gone offhttps://en.wiki
  pedia.org/wiki/1980_Damascus_Titan_missile_ex...
 
    roywiggins - 4 hours ago
    Interesting that both incidents caused by using the wrong tool
    (screwdriver here, socket there). Such a tiny thing, a hand
    tool in the wrong place...
 
mtuker - 3 hours ago
This was really a big deal
 
mrbill - 6 hours ago
I swear I read about this in Schlosser's "Command and Control" a
couple of years ago.. maybe not.https://www.amazon.com/Command-
Control-Damascus-Accident-Ill...
 
  throwaway7645 - 5 hours ago
  This comes up on HN every few months (I've commented on it
  before)and that documentary is shocking and terrifying. The
  Arkansas one was crazy. We almost lost a rather sizeable area and
  the radiation zone is out to Memphis.
 
  pvg - 5 hours ago
  The bulk of Command and Control is about a different accident but
  this one is briefly summarized as well in a couple of paragraphs
  (p311).
 
twobyfour - 3 hours ago
Makes you wonder what's going on right now that nobody's telling
you about...
 
tomcatv - 2 hours ago
its good
 
Animats - 4 hours ago
This wasn't really that big a deal. By the Minuteman era, warheads
were safe against fires and crashes.  Nuclear weapons from several
B-52 bombers hit the ground hard in crashes without a nuclear
explosion. (Sometimes the implosion charges did go off, but not
symmetrically, as is needed to get implosion.) The Minuteman
missile itself had a solid fuel engine.  This was nowhere near as
bad as the incident described in "Command and Control". That one
was a liquid-fueled missile with hypergolic propellant.See
Wikipedia's list of nuclear accidents.[1] This wasn't one of the
big ones.[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_military_nuclear_accid...
 
  gh02t - 3 hours ago
  Yep, a modern nuclear bomb takes a very coordinated sequence to
  actually have the confinement needed to get good utilization of
  the fissile fuel (i.e., be a nuclear-driven explosion), otherwise
  they just fly apart before any significant fission/fusion can
  occur.The fuel used for a nuclear weapon is also basically
  radiologically inert by necessity so if it does explode
  conventionally there is not a significant release of radiation.
  It's pretty toxic chemically, but there's not a lot of it so it's
  not nearly as bad the fallout that would precipitate from a
  nuclear explosion.
 
  [deleted]
 
  collinmanderson - 3 hours ago
  That sounds right:> Incredible as it may sound to a civilian,
  Hicks said he spent no time worrying about the thermonuclear
  warhead. He had been convinced by his training that it was nearly
  impossible to detonate a warhead accidentally. Among other
  things, he said, the warhead had to receive codes from the
  launch-control officers, had to reach a certain altitude, and had
  to detect a certain amount of acceleration and G-force. There
  were so many safeguards built in, Hicks later joked, that a
  warhead might have been lucky to detonate even when it was
  supposed to.
 
  cmiles74 - 2 hours ago
  Supposedly static electricity could trigger the detonator in a
  nuclear weapon. There was a near accidental ignition during the
  development of "the Gadget" and my understanding is that the
  ignition system was virtually unchanged for decades.https://books
  .google.com/books?id=lJ6JDQAAQBAJ&lpg=PA41&ots=...
 
jt93 - 3 hours ago
We've been very lucky so far not to have had any serious incidents.