GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-02) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
USS McCain collision ultimately caused by UI confusion
70 points by tooba
https://arstechnica.co.uk/information-technology/2017/11/uss-mcc...
1/uss-mccain-collision-ultimately-caused-by-ui-confusion/
___________________________________________________________________
 
tomohawk - 50 minutes ago
Sometimes having too much money is worse than not having enough.
With a tighter budget, you have to wonder if such an extravagantly
over functional interface would be created.
 
  theyregreat - 22 minutes ago
  I?ve seen hundreds of millions (!!) wasted at a university on a
  program of software projects that failed miserably.Having too
  much money allows for unproven, complicated or arbitrarily
  selected solutions and more bureaucracy that introduces Tragedy
  of the Commons mediocrity and diffusion of responsbility to
  address higher-level risks.
 
lordnacho - 13 minutes ago
Even specialised UIs need to be intuitive. You should need to know
the domain (navigation), but not the specifics of everything the UI
can show.The problem with this kind of thing is people are sent on
a course, which gives everyone a false sense of control and
understanding. Clearly the crew didn't understand it, leading to a
panic and wasted time.
 
pbh101 - 46 minutes ago
UI flaws have hit the Navy before, with even worse consequences
[1].[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Vincennes_(CG-49)#Iran_Air...
 
  dragonwriter - 35 minutes ago
  Nothing I see in that article (or anything else I've seen about
  the incident) attributes it to a UI issue.Not all errors made by
  users are the fault of the UI.
 
    theyregreat - 18 minutes ago
    More than binary nuance is needed. The ship that crashed is a
    system of humans plus machines, the UI being just the API
    between the two. Forensic incident analysis of ship design, UI,
    human factors, etc. is needed.
 
jordanb - 36 minutes ago
The real cause of the collision was poor seamanship and failure to
follow the COLREGS on the part of the bridge crew of the destroyer.
Most specifically they were seriously in violation of Rule 6: the
Safe Speed Rulehttp://navruleshandbook.com/Rule6.html  Every vessel
shall at all times proceed at a safe speed so    that she can take
proper and effective action to avoid    collision and be stopped
within a distance appropriate to    the prevailing circumstances
and conditions.  The USS McCain was traveling at over 20 knots at
the time of the collision, through a very crowded area at the
entrance of a traffic separation scheme. If they hadn't been
traveling at this obviously excessive speed they would have had the
time to think, and to work through little UI issues like the one
described here.
 
  drsopp - 17 minutes ago
  I?m sorry for bringing this up here, but why do I need to scroll
  sideways in Safari on iphone on Hacker News every time there is a
  quote written in an unproportional font? Just, why?
 
    wtallis - 12 minutes ago
    Because the markup for those blocks isn't intended for general-
    purpose quotations; it's  blocks. You don't word-wrap
    code.
 
    monocasa - 10 minutes ago
    Because he used block quote syntax.  It's designed for code on
    HN's implementation, so it preserves newlines, instead making
    you scroll.It's a poor choice for quoting non computer
    languages.
 
      Jtsummers - 3 minutes ago
      More importantly, in mobile the code block's width is only
      200 pixels.
 
  acdx - 6 minutes ago
  Leave it to HN to uncover the real cause.
 
  csours - 24 minutes ago
  The path to a disaster has been compared to a tunnel [0]. You can
  escape from the tunnel at many points, but you may not realize
  it.Trying to find the 'real cause' is a fool's errand, because
  there are many places and ways to  avoid the outcome.I do take
  your meaning, reducing speed and following well established rules
  would have almost certainly have saved them.0. PDF: http://www
  .leonardo-in-flight.nl/PDF/FieldGuide%20to%20Human...Amazon:
  https://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-Understanding-Human-Error...
 
    JshWright - moments ago
    I've never heard the tunnel analogy. Seems odd, since tunnels
    generally only have one entrance and one exit...In a lot of
    fields where the stakes are high and mistakes are costly
    (aviation and emergency services are the two I'm most familiar
    with) the analogy used is a chain. Break any link in the chain
    and you prevent the event.https://www.aopa.org/asf/publications
    /inst_reports2.cfm?arti...
 
    mostlyskeptical - moments ago
    As we say when teaching new riders to ride a motorcycle, a
    crash is often an intersection of factors.  If you remove even
    one of those issues it likely would have prevented it.
 
CamperBob2 - 1 hours ago
The Navy's investigation found that both collisions were avoidable
accidents. And in the case of the USS McCain, the accident was in
part caused by an error made in switching which control console on
the ship's bridge had steering controlSo, basically this was a
reprise of the AF 447 crash at sea, where lack of clear command
authority combined with a maddeningly poorly-thought-out UI
resulted in a serious accident with loss of life.At least they
didn't have genuine malfunctioning hardware on top of everything
else, the way the Air France crew did.  They just thought they had
a malfunction.
 
  foldr - 52 minutes ago
  >So, basically this was a reprise of the AF 447 crash at sea,
  where lack of clear command authority combined with a maddeningly
  poorly-thought-out UI resulted in a serious accident with loss of
  life.I don't want to take this off on a tangent, but this theory
  of the AF 447 crash keeps getting repeated online despite the
  fact that the accident report did not conclude that the UI was a
  factor.If it's got to the point where the pilots have lost track
  of who's flying the plane, are ignoring the (audible) "dual
  control" warning, and are making conflicting control inputs, the
  plane is probably going to crash anyway. Linking the sticks
  physically has potential safety downsides in addition to safety
  upsides (e.g. in the case where one stick gets stuck, or a
  incapacitated pilot holds it in a particular position).See e.g.
  here for further info on sidesticks and safety:https://aviation.s
  tackexchange.com/questions/14027/sidestick...
 
    dredmorbius - 44 minutes ago
    Hearing (one of many) alarms is one thing.Feeling the control
    wheel or stick fighting you is far more direct.AF 447 was
    absolutely a UX failure.
 
      foldr - 42 minutes ago
      If you're going to go against the conclusions of the accident
      report, which is very thorough, you'll have to do more than
      just assert that the side sticks were responsible.Check it
      out here: https://www.bea.aero/docspa/2009/f-cp090601.en/pdf/
      f-cp09060...
 
    NoPiece - 43 minutes ago
    I'd call it an interpretation, not a theory. But clearly the
    conflicting inputs was a UI problem, and while there may be
    tradeoffs, a better UI could have prevented the AF 447 crash.
 
      foldr - 41 minutes ago
      This really won't die. It's clear if you read the accident
      report (linked in another comment) that the plane was already
      doomed by the time that conflicting inputs were potentially a
      factor.
 
    mikeash - 39 minutes ago
    With linked controls, the sane pilot at the controls would have
    immediately realized that the crazy one was fighting him, and
    it would have been brought to a swift end.I know a lot of
    pilots and I don?t recall ever hearing one express the opinion
    that non-linked dual controls were anything other than idiotic.
    I?d personally be quite wary of ever flying such a machine.
    (Although of course the stuff I fly uses purely mechanical
    controls so there?s no choice in the matter.)
 
      foldr - 38 minutes ago
      The sane pilot realized this anyway. Check the accident
      report.(Or rather, the captain realized once he entered the
      cockpit. Neither of the pilots in the cockpit ever figured it
      out.)
 
        mikeash - 25 minutes ago
        Once Bonin told them he had been holding the stick back the
        entire time, they immediately began a proper recovery, it
        was just far too late. This might have happened much, much
        earlier if the other pilot at the controls had been able to
        feel this.
 
          foldr - 21 minutes ago
          What is your source for this? It does not seem consistent
          with sections 2.1.3.4-5 of the report.In any case, the
          captain was not holding a stick when he returned to the
          cockpit, as both pilots were in their seats. So the
          captain could not have gotten any tactile feedback
          regardless of the stick design.
 
          mikeash - 17 minutes ago
          This transcript:
          http://www.popularmechanics.com/flight/a3115/what-really-
          hap...I?m not talking about the captain, I?m talking
          about the other pilot at the controls, Robert. He also
          held the stick back for some time, but he appears to have
          done this in the mistaken belief that the correct
          recovery procedure had been tried and failed.
 
          foldr - 11 minutes ago
          That is an article in popular mechanics that contains a
          few excerpts from the transcript selected in order to
          make a particular point. The accident report gives a
          detailed description of the behavior of both pilots
          before the copilot entered (2.1.2.3).One possible
          misconception here is that the copilot would have had his
          hands on the stick. It isn't normal for both pilots to
          have their hands on the stick. Only the pilot flying does
          -- for obvious reasons. At the stage where the problem
          developed, the copilot's attention, as the report
          explains, was mostly concerned with trying to interpret
          the ECAM warnings, and later with calling the captain.
          The idea that the copilot would have closely observed his
          own (hypothetically linked) stick and detected the
          problem, despite being fundamentally confused about what
          was going on, and having many more things on his plate,
          is little more than wishful thinking. The possibility
          cannot be conclusively ruled out, but there is no
          evidence that this would have happened.
 
        CamperBob2 - 22 minutes ago
        And why didn't they figure it out...?
 
          foldr - 21 minutes ago
          Read the report. There is no simple answer to that
          question. It was a complicated and confusing situation,
          and the pilots in the cockpit made a number of mistakes.
 
tlb - 1 hours ago
Amazing that someone would design in multiple steering wheels, only
one of which is active, and no big indicator to make it super-
obvious which one it is.Also amazing that there's a mode where
moving a control sometimes controls all engines, sometimes just
one.
 
  oasisbob - 45 minutes ago
  Having differential engine control isn't too surprising - it's
  just another way to maintain a course in addition to the
  rudder.Jetliners have gangable throttle controls for their
  engines, albeit with what is probably a much better interface.
 
  digi_owl - 42 minutes ago
  Happens more often than we like.I know of a ferry that a local
  warf built that had two bridges, and a combined throttle and
  rudder in each.The thing is that when moving from one bridge to
  the other, the crew had to flip a switch to indicate what
  direction was forward. And quite often they forgot.End result was
  a long history of damaged because ferry would ram the pier when
  the crew was actually attempting to move away from it.
 
    theyregreat - 28 minutes ago
    That is super dumb and dangerous. They should just flip the
    inputs on one end.
 
      nicwolff - 11 minutes ago
      No, they just have a big button by each wheel marked "MAKE
      THIS THE BOW".
 
  nostrademons - 3 minutes ago
  I can imagine the requirements doc that led to that, where some
  Pentagon wonk was thinking "What happens if the helmsman is shot?
  If there's engine damage?  If the helmsman is shot and there's
  engine damage?" and wrote all of those cases in, and completely
  forgot about the case where the bridge crew gets super confused
  because they triggered an edge case in the software and has no
  idea how to regain control of the ship.
 
  theyregreat - 30 minutes ago
  Redundant affordances are needed:Controls that are active should
  be illuminated in a particular color, say red.Controls that are
  disabled should be extinguished, physically-locked or track
  active controls, and sound a warning when manipulated.
 
  Jtsummers - 1 hours ago
  Check out the recent O'Reilly book Tragic Design for more
  situations exactly like this.Poor UI design is remarkably common,
  even on controls that are essential for safe
  operations.http://www.tragicdesign.com
 
    csours - 18 minutes ago
    Also the classic Field Guide to Understanding Human
    Error.Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-Understanding-
    Human-Error...Older PDF (paperback is well worth it, in my
    opinion): http://www.leonardo-in-
    flight.nl/PDF/FieldGuide%20to%20Human...
 
  [deleted]
 
Zak - 28 minutes ago
Aside from the lack of clarity about which station has control over
what, which should be made really obvious, with additional warnings
when someone sets a control input on an inactive station, this
seems bizarre to me:* While the Ship's Control Console has a wheel
for manual steering, both steering and throttle can be controlled
with trackballs, with the adjustments showing up on the screens for
each station. *I've never been on the bridge of a ship, but I've
operated a lot of vehicles including boats, ATVs, snowmobiles,
cars, bulldozers and once, an army Blackhawk helicopter simulator.
These very disparate vehicles had one thing in common: there's a
relationship between the position of any movement-related control
and the movement commanded, and there are stops at the limits of
control input.Trackballs do not have either property, and I'm
having trouble thinking of advantages they might offer in this
application.
 
  csours - 15 minutes ago
  None of those operate on the open ocean.There's a wheel there for
  steering; from the article it sounds like the trackball is used
  with a menu system of some type, not directly to set the steering
  angle.
 
bluetwo - 25 minutes ago
I'm sure we've all read "The Inmates are Running the Asylum" by
Alan Cooper.