GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-02) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The Exercise Pill
104 points by artsandsci
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/11/06/a-pill-to-make-exe...
___________________________________________________________________
 
philipkglass - 3 hours ago
There seem to be basically two arguments against "exercise
pills."1) Self-discipline is virtuous in and of itself. We
shouldn't develop alternative ways to control weight and/or
maintain muscle tone without controlling food intake and exercise,
because that undermines the tangible rewards of virtue.2) Biology
is extremely complicated, and the drug that keeps you compact and
muscular in your 40s might end up promoting the growth of cancerous
tumors all over your body in your 60s. (As happened to the older
mice who received high doses of GW501516.)I don't agree at all with
the first argument. The second one is alarming enough that I'm not
going to be the first or even the millionth person in line to
obtain these compounds through grey-market channels and dose
myself. Similarly, I would love a drug cocktail that prevents the
unwanted physical effects of aging, but I'll let other people blaze
a trail with human trials (clinical or self-experimentation.)
 
  nsxwolf - 2 hours ago
  1) will never happen, so, bring on the pill!
 
  coldtea - 2 hours ago
  > I don't agree at all with the first argument.Makes sense (not
  agreeing). The whole culture of modern society is all about not
  agreeing with such arguments.That is, finding any idea of value
  in some authenticity that shouldn't be replicated
  technologically, silly.
 
    philipkglass - 1 hours ago
    I'm almost regretting including item 1, because the percentage
    of HN commenters who embody that attitude appears to be much
    lower than in comment sections on other parts of the web.
    Anecdotally, I can tell you that a significant minority of
    modern humans who comment on news articles are just furious
    about actual or projected technological advances that allow
    people to prevent e.g. obesity or pregnancy without relying on
    strenuous mental and/or physical discipline. That's why I
    mentioned it.
 
      XorNot - 1 hours ago
      I have no idea why you're getting down voted here and I agree
      completely - see the reactions to the mere existence of
      Soylent as a concept.
 
  reasonattlm - 2 hours ago
  A better argument against this line of development is that it is
  demonstrably expensive and low-yield.There are far better R&D
  approaches to maintaining health over the course of aging, but
  they get a tiny fraction of the effort lavished on exercise and
  calorie restriction mimetics, despite the continued absence of
  concrete therapeutic outcomes resulting from all of that
  investment.The reason for this is probably that exercise and
  calorie restriction mimetic research dovetails well with the real
  underlying scientific goal of mapping metabolism, where as better
  approaches tend to bypass this need for mapping, focusing instead
  on well-known forms of damage that cause age-related decline.
 
  colordrops - 2 hours ago
  3) There other benefits to exercise, including stretching and
  loosening joints and ligaments, building coordination and body
  awareness, mental benefits, etc.  Sweating has benefits as well.
  I'd find it really hard to imagine that some pill that mucks with
  metabolism or muscle growth or some other single dimension would
  cover even a small portion of the benefits of exercise.
 
    lostconfused - 4 minutes ago
    The article has a certain bias and tone. A lot of points are
    just kind of swept under with this quote "the biological
    processes unleashed by physical activity are still relatively
    mysterious. For all the known benefits of a short loop around
    the park, scientists are, for the most part, incapable of
    explaining how exercise does what it does."The biological
    process in the human body that depend on upright motion include
    far more than just simple muscle stimulation and growth. The
    circular system is meant to work against gravity in concert
    with muscle contraction. It should be relatively obvious that
    there's indeed far more to exercise and basic bodily functions
    than this pill covers.
 
    blacksmith_tb - 3 minutes ago
    I don't see any reason you couldn't take the pill and exercise.
    In many cases people who aren't doing any sort of exercise are
    held back by being so out of shape that they can't really get
    into the habit, in which case having a pharmaceutical head
    start might be reasonable.
 
    scarmig - 2 hours ago
    There are lots of benefits, and it's very unlikely a pill, or
    even a cocktail of pills, could emulate all those benefits.That
    said, if you found a safe pill that would merely give the
    cardiovascular benefits of exercise, or help elderly patients
    maintain muscle mass, or move obese people to just being
    overweight, it would be worth tens or hundreds of billions of
    dollars.
 
    chiefalchemist - 1 hours ago
    Yes and no.Look around. When, as the article mentions, the
    option is no pill vs some pill that helps in some way; for most
    people the pill makes sense.As it is today, many people could
    alter their diets and improve their health. Yet they do not.In
    an ideal world this pill makes little sense. But our First
    World world of today is far from ideal. Put another way, they
    say that worldwide more people die from eating too much than
    not eating enough.
 
      colordrops - 1 hours ago
      Sure.  I was just saying there are other arguments against
      these pills.  I'm not a luddite or a perfectionist and can
      see their use case though.
 
    derefr - 1 hours ago
    A lot of the exercise we get is sort of implicit: it's "non-
    exercise activity thermogenesis" ? a.k.a., fidgeting.I'd expect
    a drug that "mimicked exercise" would really do so in part by
    making you exercise more, without realizing you're doing so:
    i.e., by making you fidgety (and sweaty, and achier in your
    joints so you'd want to stretch more, etc.)
 
  watwut - 2 hours ago
  1.) People who exercise because they want to look good or like it
  are no more virtuous. That is pretty much an equivalent of saying
  that if you spend hours choosing just the right dress and makeup,
  you are more virtuous.I exercise because I enjoy it and partly to
  look better. I really don't think it makes me more virtuous then,
  say, fat people who don't exercises, but are overall nicer or
  more helping to people around then I am. Or simply people who
  read more book then I am or people who teach kids in their free
  time or whatever.
 
  arnarbi - 2 hours ago
  > I don't agree at all with the first argumentWhat if some of the
  commonly known positive effects of exercise, such as battling
  depression, are actually psychological effects of that discipline
  and motivation rather than physical fitness? I find it hard to
  argue this can't be the case.
 
    philipkglass - 2 hours ago
    Then that would be another point in favor of actually
    exercising, if the pills don't hit enough of the same
    biological systems to mimic the anti-depressive effect. I'm not
    rejecting any benefits of exercise that can be empirically
    demonstrated. I just want to distinguish "X has historically
    been the best way to achieve Y" from "X is virtuous, and should
    not be neglected even if technical progress provides easier
    ways to achieve Y."There is virtue in working hard to achieve
    good outcomes, but not in working harder than actually
    necessary to achieve those same outcomes. (If you want to do
    things a harder way than strictly necessary because it's a fun
    pastime for you, that's fine too. Then the experience itself
    rather than the end state is what you are seeking.)
 
      arnarbi - 2 hours ago
      Ah fair enough, I misunderstood. I agree doing things for the
      sole reason of being virtuous doesn't make sense.Although I
      do think the origin of "virtue" is because some things had
      good general effects, but nobody was able to explain why or
      how. Of course the concept has been abused since then.
 
        edanm - 1 hours ago
        Some societies found it virtuous to kill anyone not of the
        right race/religion. Some societies found/find it virtuous
        to genitally mutilate women.I'm not sure we can come up
        with a principled way to distinguish the "good" kind of
        virtuous from the "bad" kind of virtuous without just
        deciding by ourselves what is virtuous and what isn't, at
        least to some degree.
 
          costcopizza - 1 hours ago
          Yeah, but 'some' is different than most.It's pretty dang
          universal to feel "good" after putting in effort to
          achieve something.
 
    watwut - 2 hours ago
    If that would be true, then anything that requires discipline
    and motivation would help with depression. That is not the case
    - regular washing dishes or reading or most crafts don't have
    the same reported effect.That being said, the help with
    depression is not because you become physically fit. Exercise
    works even if you train in an ineffective way. It has more to
    do with chemistry (e.g. endorphins) in your brain then with
    overall result.
 
    otakucode - 2 hours ago
    Well, it's not germane to the discussion.  The issue of whether
    there are positive psychological consequences of discipline and
    motivation and whether there are positive moral implications of
    virtue are completely unrelated topics.  Pancakes taste good
    with maple syrup, but it doesn't do much to address the thing
    the first argument actually says.In terms of ways in which
    "discipline" and "motivation" might provide benefits such as
    battling depression... I could see arguments both for and
    against as plausible.  Feeling that restrictions on your
    actions are entirely of your own choosing is tremendously
    helpful at reducing the negative consequences of harmful
    stimulus, that is supported by research.  I am unaware of any
    research that says it can actually tip the needle the other
    direction and make a negative stimulus into a positive, but it
    could be possible.  Then again, there are a billion other ways
    in which our volition is infringed upon on a daily basis by
    society flagrantly which probably contribute far more to
    depression and anxiety and similar problems than anything minor
    like what limits you might put on yourself, so taking away just
    that bit should probably not be a noticeable change.The problem
    most people have with "virtue" arguments (and I share in this)
    is that if there is a REASON something should be avoided, then
    the reason suffices.  If there is no reason, then you are
    inherently wrong to advocate that other people avoid it.  And
    trying to paper over the situation with societal shame is just
    repugnant.
 
      r00fus - 30 minutes ago
      The discussion is about benefits of exercise being replaced
      by a pill.Whether the mood/psychological benefits come (or
      don't) with the pill as opposed to exercise, I think is
      germane to the discussion.
 
    lagadu - 2 hours ago
    Nobody is suggesting that a pill should replace exercise in all
    scenarios; most of us do it because it's damn enjoyable which
    is why there are so many different forms. Depression is a
    problem that would exist regardless, the difference is that
    with a pill existing depressive people would only be depressed
    instead of depressed and suffering from the other problems
    caused by lack of exercise.
 
  derefr - 1 hours ago
  I find #1 funny, in that appetite and "self-discipline" seem to
  be biologically inversely correlated in at least some sense.
  Boost dopamine (such as with the old amphetamine-based "diet
  pills"), and you get more control over your impulses... but also
  your appetite goes away, so you don't even need to exert control
  over it. Lower dopamine (such as with a typical antipsychotic),
  and you get hungry, but also find it harder to override your
  impulses in general. (If you're curious, this is thought to help
  in psychosis because "skepticism"/"being realistic" is one of the
  lower-level impulses that dopamine overrides.)If self-discipline
  were virtuous, would the "best" exercise pill be one that only
  enhances self-discipline (with no stimulant-like side-
  effects)?and thus makes it easy to be one of those people who
  just "decide to exercise and eat healthy" and end up doing so? Or
  would people likely still consider that "cheating" in some sense?
  And if so, do you think such people would be able to be convinced
  at that point that they're literally just measuring the "virtue"
  of people's genetics, rather than of their choices?
 
    wickawic - 19 minutes ago
    This line of reasoning is why giving children (or anyone,
    really) medication for moderate behavioral problems is an
    ethical gray area. If there is a pill that helps an unruly-but-
    otherwise-healthy kid sit still and stay focused, do you have
    them take it? At what point does an element of your personality
    become a medical issue?
 
  lagadu - 2 hours ago
  The first argument is flat-out ridiculous. The same argument
  could be used against farming or housing or even building
  communities.The second is very real and of course requires us to
  tread very carefully but shouldn't be a reason to stop
  investigating something.
 
    [deleted]
 
    [deleted]
 
  deepnotderp - 23 minutes ago
  The situation with GW was really interesting, the study had
  incredibly high doses, but I don't doubt that they had reasons
  for pulling the drug, although I'm sure WADA pressure didn't
  help.
 
  drzaiusapelord - 2 hours ago
  I still lean on item 1 being the most correct. I know modern
  society is built on a "do anything" approach but in reality we're
  under the gun of biology and evolution and as such only certain
  behavioral patterns are actually successful. I found losing
  weight and staying fit got a lot easier when I focused on
  discipline instead of quick fixes like Atkins. There's an art to
  pushing back on that neurological trigger craving that dopamine
  shot and it can be learned.  (Of course, if a pill comes out to
  help you with that trigger, then we're golden). Or more
  practically, a way to produce leptin and ghrelin in the body so
  hunger and craving response goes way down.I'm not saying I'm
  "against" the pill, but no pill is going to magically erase
  1,000+ calories of over-eating or clear out all the awful things
  excess sugar and other carbs may do. It may certainly mitigate
  them, but like the person I know who got lapband surgery
  eventually found out, his eating just adapted to his new
  limitations (ice cream, sweets, etc dont take much room and are
  very high energy) and he gained weight after a while. We'll pop
  the pill, eat like pigs, and be at the same weight or higher
  after a while.I imagine if this becomes a mass market medicine,
  its effective applications will be outside of weight control and
  more towards helping people achieve a certain level of fitness
  especially those with limited mobility or illness. Its not
  something you're going to buy able to buy over the counter for
  'free' workouts. The same way you can't buy testosterone or
  steroids OTC.
 
zeveb - 3 hours ago
I imagine that, if successful, this could make more money than
Viagra.  I'd happily pay several hundred dollars a month to have a
fit body without ever exercising.
 
  kolbe - 3 hours ago
  It's existed for a very long time, but still hasn't fully taken
  off.http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199607043350101
 
    romanovcode - 55 minutes ago
    Steroids are one of the most used drugs in the world. It taken
    off pretty well.
 
    zerr - 2 hours ago
    Does it also have the same health benefits as exercises?
 
      bagacrap - 2 hours ago
      It (supraphysiological doses of testosterone, meaning more
      than any human produces naturally) causes cancer, hair loss,
      interferes with endogenous hormonal function, and entails
      many other deleterious side effects that exercise does not.
      It will increase aerobic capacity by increasing red blood
      cell count but too much added viscosity of the blood also
      poses a health risk. So this is rather different from
      "exercise in a pill".
 
        lossolo - 1 hours ago
        > causes cancerSource? Because 200 mg of Testosterone E a
        week is already more than human organism can produce. In
        study linked above they gave them 600 mg a week.Most
        professional bodybuilders are doing minimum of 1g of test a
        week for years. Most of them have heart problems if any
        from test. Most problems they have are from different
        compounds like Trenbolone, GH etc. but not testosterone.I
        don't know any study that links testosterone to be a main
        reason of developing cancer, that's why I ask for source.
 
      kolbe - 2 hours ago
      Depends on the benefit. It will decrease fat, increase
      strength and increase muscle mass. I don't know about VO2 max
      or lactic threshold stuff, though.
 
        toomanybeersies - 20 minutes ago
        Clenbuterol will increase your VO2 max, so will EPO.
 
xpaulbettsx - 40 minutes ago
For anyone considering buying this (which was me until 5mins ago)
read
https://www.reddit.com/r/steroids/comments/6477mr/compound_e...The
important bit:> In animal trials, there are dose equivalence
calculations you have to do first. Since rats were used in the
study you have to divide their dosage by 6.2 for the human
equivalence. So the 5 mg/kg/day for males and 3 mg/kg/day for
females works out to 0.806 mg/kg/day and 0.484 mg/kg/day,
respectively. For example, a 115 lb female would have an equivalent
dosage of ~25 mg. That's a whole lot closer to the doses some of
you are taking.>  In the study, cancer was seen even in rats on the
lowest dosage. For all we know, they could have gotten cancer at
lower doses too.
 
ravenstine - 2 hours ago
I have a feeling such a pill would go the way of testosterone
which, even though it could be safely administered to people who
don't necessarily have "Low T" to positive ends, is still only a
treatment for those who desperately need it.  People on the low end
of whatever arbitrary, non-standard serum testosterone scale often
don't get treatment because they are technically "normal", which
completely disregards the benefit someone can see from being
brought to the high-end of the scale.  Likewise, an exercise pill
might only be given to those who are morbidly obese rather than
mostly sedentary office workers who would rather get more work done
than dedicate another hour every day towards mindless exercise.
 
  rblatz - 2 hours ago
  There are plenty of clinics that specialize in just what you are
  talking about.  I believe they commonly call themselves balanced
  hormone clinics.  I also think that is a common thing they do in
  anti-aging clinics.
 
lend000 - 2 hours ago
Fascinating -- as much as I enjoy to be active and stretch out, I
imagine the benefits of sustained exertion could be entirely
replaced by an artificial mechanism. This would be a nice time
saver, and if it provides the same good feelings that you get after
a good workout, then health in an active person could even be
improved by preventing the need for heavy exertion and focusing on
stretching and movement. This could reduce joint stresses and put
more hours in the day. Very excited to see the effects of this
drugs in humans.
 
kolbe - 3 hours ago
Steroids have been known to do this for decades (if not
centuries)http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199607043350101
 
chiefalchemist - 1 hours ago
"...There are a handful of other contexts where a short course of
an exercise pill could be extremely useful..."Missing from the list
that followed has: people wearing VR goggles (e.g., Oculus Rift)
and never leaving their bed or sofa.The Matrix isn't as far fetched
as it used to be :)
 
0xbear - 1 hours ago
Before the exercise pill, it?d be good to have a pill which helps
with exercise. For instance strengthens the ligaments without
destroying flexibility too much. Or boosts endurance without having
horrible side effects, stuff like that. Seems like an easier
problem than an all encompassing ?exercise pill?.
 
  maaaats - 1 hours ago
  Yeah, I don't care much for a pill replacing exercise. A pill
  giving me the ability to exercise without all my ails though...
 
thomascgalvin - 3 hours ago
> Mice that had been given large doses of the drug over the course
of two years (a lifetime for a lab rodent) developed cancer at a
higher rate than their dope-free peers. Tumors appeared all over
their bodies, from the tongue to the testes.> ...> Since then, he
has developed a less potent version that he hopes will also be less
toxic.So yeah, this isn't exactly ready for mass consumption.
 
  dmix - 2 hours ago
  This is quite the generalization, plenty of drugs have negative
  side effects in high doses (see: tylenol). It doesn't mean they
  aren't still widely useful in small ones. If anything we need to
  learn more about the drug, just like any other.> The combination
  of effects made 516 seem like a promising treatment for what?s
  known as ?metabolic syndrome,? a cluster of symptoms?including
  obesity, high blood pressure, and high blood sugar?that is a
  precursor to heart disease and diabetes. More than a third of
  adult Americans are estimated to have metabolic syndrome, which
  made 516?s potential profits seem rather attractive.The dangers
  of rampant heart disease and type-2 diabetes can't be understated
  either in this context.Also the next paragraph notes it only
  caused cancer in later stages of the mouses life which may
  translate to 60-70yrs in humans. It's possible there are
  potential trade offs still at lower doses for people in their 50s
  at a high risk of dying from heart failure.Not to mention
  tweaking the drug itself.
 
  kolbe - 3 hours ago
  Whereas the link between anabolic steroids and cancer is pretty
  weak. If someone is interested in getting fit (or fit looking)
  with pills, we already have some pretty good stuff out
  there.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3827559/
 
    [deleted]
 
corpMaverick - 2 hours ago
Can we at least have a pill that makes you want to exercise?
 
  comicjk - 1 hours ago
  "Preworkout" (sugar and caffeine) products are basically this, as
  long as your caffeine tolerance is not too high.
 
  andai - 1 hours ago
  5-15ug of LSD ought to do it! Traditional stimulants
  (methylphenidate, amphetamine) work pretty well too.
 
  toomanybeersies - 26 minutes ago
  Amphetamines and heavy metal music will work.
 
  Domenic_S - 2 hours ago
  Zoloft (half-joking).
 
imoldfella - 3 hours ago
"After the age of forty, all of us, even the athletic, lose about
eight per cent of our muscle mass each decade, with a further
fifteen-per-cent decline between the ages of seventy and eighty.
"This has not been my experience. I have added pretty substantial
muscle mass between the ages of 48 and 55 with fairly conventional
weight lifting and diet with no PED's. My back squat has gone from
185 to 385 (pounds)and my deadlift from 265 to 465. 40 seems way
too early to start packing it in.
 
  yathern - 3 hours ago
  Congrats on the gains! Though of course you are just an anecdote.
  But I'm curious how much of this muscle mass loss is due to
  biological changes vs lifestyle changes.
 
    chrisseaton - 3 hours ago
    Well it does say 'all of us', so a single anecdote does
    disprove it. I think the original commentator was pointing out
    the sloppy writing.
 
      matt4077 - 3 hours ago
      Yeah. The article's sentence also fails to account for people
      dying, who lose much more than 8% of muscle mass, and really
      stupid robots reading the article, who lose none of their
      muscle mass, but will have trouble understanding that,
      sometimes, language is ambiguous and requires a modicum of
      contextual reasoning, or else every sentence would require
      dozens of qualifications and would read like a regulation on
      insurance law.
 
        jaggederest - 2 hours ago
        "There may exist at least one person who may have lost
        muscle mass over time."
 
    stevenwoo - 3 hours ago
    I think my exercise and physiology textbook stated an age
    related decline in muscle mass happens in everyone after about
    40 without a concerted program of strength training to stave it
    off.
 
      imoldfella - 1 hours ago
      That certainly sounds more credible. I encourage all the
      HN'ers north of 40 to try weightlifting. We have members
      older than myself seeing good results.
 
  CryoLogic - 2 hours ago
  There have been a number of top level powerlifters in their 40's.
  Most of these studies don't study people with solid diet and
  training routines.
 
    noarchy - 1 hours ago
    This holds for bodybuilding, too, though that is admittedly a
    very subjective (appearance-based) sport compared to
    powerlifting where there are real numbers by which to compare
    everyone. Dexter Jackson placed 4th at this year's Mr. Olympia
    at age 47.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dexter_Jackson_(bodybui
    lder)#C...
 
    0xbear - 1 hours ago
    They all take PEDs though.
 
  [deleted]
 
  bduerst - 3 hours ago
  This metric is without targeted anaerobic exercise like
  weightlifting.  Decreases in hormones and neurotransmitters
  result in the body maintaining less muscle mass, even with
  aerobic exercise.
 
    nscalf - 2 hours ago
    As far as I know, there really isn't too much risk associated
    with hormone replacement therapy.  If you add that into the
    mix, I'd be surprised to see any significant shifts over the
    human lifespan.
 
  aqme28 - 3 hours ago
  Without changing your lifting regimen? I find that hard to
  believe.
 
    beat - 1 hours ago
    I'm assuming he means that's when he started with the weight
    training.I'm 52, and recently started a strength/interval
    training regimen. In just a few weeks, I've increased my
    resistance loads 25-50%, and I'm losing a steady 1.5 pounds per
    week or so without a drastic diet change. It's a lot easier to
    control my eating now, too.
 
    0xbear - 1 hours ago
    By definition, to lift heavier weight one has to change their
    lifting regimen.
 
      beat - 1 hours ago
      The regimen isn't really the amount of weight involved. It's
      how often you do it, how many reps, etc. For example, I'm
      doing interval training - something like, say, 10 chest
      presses, 10 lateral pulls, 30 seconds of crunches, and repeat
      this cycle three times. Then go to the next cycle, which
      might be something like incline pushups, bicep curls, and
      squats, again 3x.If I were to change to, say, 5 reps at
      maximum weight just one time(heavy strength train), that
      would be a change in regimen.
 
        0xbear - 56 minutes ago
        That?s not a lifting regimen. You don?t need crunches if
        you?re doing heavy squats or deadlifts. You don?t need
        bicep curls at all. And chest press must be balanced with
        barbell rows. As to how many reps, I only do 10 or more
        reps during warmup. From there on out it?s 5 reps per set
        or so, and at the end I do a few heavy singles at about
        85-90% of PR.
 
    imoldfella - 1 hours ago
    No, I _started_ lifting seriously at 48. I was objecting to the
    observation that loss of muscle was inevitable after 40 "even
    the athletic". Its not. That doesn't address the value or
    danger of GW501516 since I didn't use.Most of the people using
    this drug are using it with more serious exercise than I'm
    doing. In practice its being used as an exercise supplement,
    not replacement.
 
    mlevental - 2 hours ago
    2x improvement in 7 years? there's nothing unbelievable about
    that?
 
      berdon - 1 hours ago
      2x improvement just depends on where you start in relation to
      where you have been. If you haven't lifted legs heavily for a
      while you'll have to start lower but you'll quickly regain
      that lost grown. Well, you'll regain the lost ground faster
      than you'll go up past your old max.
 
  jessriedel - 58 minutes ago
  You're misinterpreting the statement.  It is obviously not
  claiming that muscle mass follows a specific trajectory
  regardless of all other factors.  It is claiming that muscle mass
  follows a statistical trajectory holding other factors
  constant.It's as if someone said that a car coasting to a stop
  slows by roughly 1% of speed every second and you tried to refute
  this by pointing out that if you hit the accelerator it goes
  faster.
 
deepnotderp - 20 minutes ago
Also, fwiw, (iirc) they observed huge benefits to exercising even
when GW and AICAR were taken in tandem, so it's probably most
useful as an exercise amplifier.