GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-28) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Orchid: a new surveillance-free layer on top of the existing
Internet
43 points by apsec112
http://orchidprotocol.com
___________________________________________________________________
 
halite - 6 minutes ago
When are they doing ICO!?
 
anotheryou - 1 hours ago
buzzwords I see. what does it do?
 
  jv22222 - 1 hours ago
  From the FAQ:The Orchid protocol uses an overlay network built
  upon the existing Internet, which is driven by a peer-to-peer
  tokenized bandwidth exchange.The orchid protocol is an open-
  source overlay network that runs on top of the Internet. Its
  fully decentralized, because rather than traffic being routed
  through central authorities?your ISP or your VPN?it?s instead
  routed randomly through a network of bandwidth contributors who
  sign up to share their surplus bandwidth and activate their
  Internet-connected device as a ?node.?Users that want to access
  an uncensored Internet (bandwidth consumers) pay the bandwidth
  contributors in Orchid tokens through a peer-to-peer exchange.
  Because neither the traffic nor the payments can be monitored by
  central authorities, both contributors and consumers of bandwidth
  enjoy a fully anonymous, surveillance-free experience.Also of
  note:Who are the founders?Stephen Bell: Steve started companies
  in Europe, the U.S., and China before founding Trilogy VC China,
  where he spent 10 years backing Chinese seed stage startups.Brian
  J. Fox: Brian is an entrepreneur and open-source advocate, the
  first employee of the Free Software Foundation, and the author of
  the GNU Bash shell.Jay Freeman: Jay is a software engineer and
  the developer of the Cydia software distribution platform used on
  millions of jailbroken iOS devices.Gustav Simonsson: Gustav is an
  engineer and developer who helped launch Ethereum in 2015,
  working with core protocols, clients, and security auditing.Dr.
  Steven Waterhouse: Steven is an experienced investor and
  entrepreneur, having co-founded RPX Corp, led cryptocurrency
  projects at Fortress and Pantera Capital, and the Honeycomb
  product at Sun Microsystems.[Edit] I _think_ they are trying to
  create something like Etherium but for decentralized internet.
 
diaperIITB - moments ago
How is the route decided? If it uses a centralized server for that,
then wouldn't it be easy to block that.
 
qeternity - 1 hours ago
They call it a protocol but this is very much a startup/ICO, having
raised nearly $5m in seed. Not that there is anything wrong with
this, it seems like a very cool project. But it does seem to be
very intentionally presenting itself as something that is closer to
a not-for-profit a la Tor.
 
  saurik - 34 minutes ago
  It is maybe worth noting that we had actually looked into whether
  we could be registered as a non-profit and still raise money by
  these means to build out our implementation and market it to the
  world, and that was simply not possible :/. We are, however, all
  deeply committed to open source, and are working on how to best
  ensure that this is enforced in the company's charter (such that
  even if there are any future changes, there will never be any
  fear).All of our work is to be released under the AGPL3; and,
  while we have filed for a patent, we will be licensing the patent
  to the world in a manner similar to how Mozilla manages their
  patent portfolio. Brian Fox, who is in charge of making sure we
  have a successful and inclusive open source project, was the
  original developer of the bash shell, was for a while the
  maintainer of GNU emacs, and was the first employee of the Free
  Software Foundation (as Richard Stallman was a volunteer), and so
  is keenly aware of how important it is for technology to be
  available to everyone.
 
saurik - 43 minutes ago
Hello! My name is Jay Freeman (saurik), and I was both deeply
involved in the design of Orchid's protocol as well as in charge of
the initial implementation of the networking and routing logic, and
am happy to try to answer any questions people might have about
what we are working on!
 
  modeless - 3 minutes ago
  The FAQ says you can break through the Great Firewall of China. I
  believe that you can in some limited way now by flying under the
  radar, but I absolutely do not believe you could maintain that
  ability if this became widely used and targeted specifically by
  the authorities. What would you do if they started really
  cracking down on Orchid?
 
  em3rgent0rdr - 1 minutes ago
  Whitepaper abstract says you use "A blockchain-based stochastic
  payment mechanism with transaction costs on the order of a
  packet".  But how is such a blockchain transaction scalable to
  the entire internet when considering that it does a transaction
  for every packet?
 
  someguydave - 36 minutes ago
  How do you solve the problem of penetrating NATs and firewalls
  without relying on a central coordination server?
 
    saurik - 13 minutes ago
    If I understand your question correctly, and you are looking at
    "how do we do hole punching and NAT traversal without a way to
    get your canonical external IP address", in addition to
    techniques that don't require that kind of functionality (such
    as modern routers with UPnP port forwarding support), other
    nodes on the network can run something analogous to ICE servers
    (we have yet to decide if it should literally be STUN or if we
    need to integrate it into the security model), so all you will
    need is the address and public key of another node (which you
    will need anyway in order to connect to the network).
 
  woodandsteel - 32 minutes ago
  Is this anonymous like tor or i2p? if so, how do you do it?
 
    saurik - 2 minutes ago
    That is a very broad question that I keep looking back to and
    thinking "I'll answer other questions and get back to this one
    ;P", but I'm thinking maybe I should simply refer you to the
    almost 50-page whitepaper on our website. I am here to answer
    any questions you might still have (and I totally believe you
    will, as that whitepaper is a
    draft)!https://orchidprotocol.com/whitepaper.pdf
 
xwvvvvwx - 40 minutes ago
This is a funded startup.How do they intend to make money?
 
  kirillseva - 34 minutes ago
  ICO
 
    saurik - 21 minutes ago
    Not exactly, though I can appreciate why it might seem like
    that at first glance; we are selling a "utility token". This
    distinction is interesting and important as we are not selling
    a token to raise money to do development, instead having taken
    on seed investors to help us get the right team of developers
    and advisors to do this initial build out. The sale of tokens
    will be made after we have this network fully working and
    launched, meaning that we are really targeting a group of
    people you might call "customers" who will buy bandwidth tokens
    (as opposed to "investors", which is the target market of an
    ICO).
 
  HelloNurse - 23 minutes ago
  Sustainability isn't even the greatest concern: where there are
  customers (people who pay for access to the network) there is a
  database of customers (in order to allow authentication) that has
  to be kept out of the grasp of government agencies.
 
    saurik - 16 minutes ago
    Actually, that's the great part about what we are doing: it is
    all built on Ethereum, so there is no centralized database, and
    the users are generally pseudonymous! OK, you might then say
    "isn't that just a decentralized database?", but in addition to
    a form of "probabilistic micropayments" that ends up shrouding
    most of the participants, we are also working on integrating
    other techniques to make the payments fully anonymous (and have
    brought on a team of advisors which includes a professor of
    cryptography who specializes in this area).
 
woodandsteel - 34 minutes ago
The FAQ says"Bandwidth contributors simply install Orchid and
activate their Internet connected device as a node - either as a
relay or proxy - and then they set permissions like sites they want
to blacklist or whitelist, and they earn tokens into their Orchid
wallet for sharing their bandwidth."So hopefully the blacklisting
will eliminate the problem of nasty content that plagues anonymous
networks like Tor.
 
  zzalpha - 31 minutes ago
  How so?  If it's under individual control, you'll just end up
  with sub-networks where people will agree to distribute that type
  of content.You cannot pair anonymity and security with
  censorship.  They are fundamentally incompatible.  So either
  accept that nasty content will be out there, or acknowledge that
  you don't actually want perfect anonymity and security.
 
    saurik - 4 minutes ago
    FWIW, if you look at Tor, Facebook now runs a hidden service
    that allows people to access Facebook's website. This is
    essentially the same thing as someone having provided a number
    of exit nodes that will only route to Facebook. The problem,
    though, is that this requires the client and maybe even the
    website to be modified to use the .onion URLs for all accesses
    back to the site (at least, any absolute URL on the site back
    to the site will cause a problem). I will personally contend
    that it is worth it to allow Facebook to do this, or to allow
    anyone to do this for any website, in order to get more people
    using the network for everything, as the more users you can get
    using the service to do normal traffic the more easily you can
    hide everyone.This is particularly noticeable given that in
    some countries, such as the United States where I live, simply
    accessing the Tor website to download Tor will end up flagging
    you for further monitoring. If Tor had only as many users and
    exit nodes as it does right now, but additionally had, for
    example, a billion people in China accessing Wikipedia through
    exit nodes that refused to go anywhere but Wikipedia, that
    makes a world of difference. As it stands, people are actually
    actively discouraged and even shamed for using Tor to access
    random websites or ones that use a lot of bandwidth, as that
    means that they are using (or even "abusing") a limited amount
    of donated bandwidth that somehow needs to be reserved for
    those who "really need it" (and thereby, will be targeted just
    for that).https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/d73yd7
    /how-the-ns...
 
  saurik - 30 minutes ago
  That is absolutely our intention! While users who run nodes can
  choose to forward content to anywhere on the Internet, we want to
  provide people a feeling of control over the usage of their
  bandwidth, as we believe that (along with being paid to forward
  traffic!) will increase the number of people who are willing to
  provide bandwidth to the service. Being able to say "I am only
  willing to help users get to Wikipedia, or the New York Times" is
  something that we think is very important to being able to have
  enough people using the service to provide the levels of security
  needed for everyone on the network.
 
  throwawaysml - 25 minutes ago
  For that purpose I would think optional whitelisting would make
  more sense. Instead of spyware lists you subscribe to in uBlock
  Origin, you would subscribe to a vetted, whitelist of known to be
  generally acceptable Orchid content.Others might want to have
  empty filter list to be a complete transit/peer.Therefore I don't
  think there's much room for users who want to blacklist but are
  not rather looking for a whitelist.The blacklist will grow and
  grow, while the whitelist size will be pretty stable.That said, I
  haven't used it, so the implemented blacklist approach might
  already support the above cases and be sufficient.
 
    saurik - 19 minutes ago
    FWIW, as the person who has been doing the initial
    implementation, I can tell you that we currently only have a
    whitelist. I can appreciate why the person who was editing the
    FAQ for the website put in the world "blacklist" as it makes
    the sentence flow really well, but I agree with you about the
    issues (and there are also problems doing the distributed
    hashtable search to find nodes that don't have some property
    rather than ones that do have some property). I will poke about
    this to see if I can get it changed ASAP!
 
    kirillseva - 16 minutes ago
    If you're only using a "stable whitelist" of websites on the
    internet then you're not the target audience
 
zzalpha - 33 minutes ago
How is this different from Freenet or Tor?
 
  saurik - 28 minutes ago
  Freenet builds its own domain of content where people post
  websites that are hosted in a distributed fashion by the
  platform. What we are working on with this initial implementation
  is a fully-decentralized tunneling service to access existing
  content posted on the internet (so if you were to compare it to
  an existing technology, you might look at Tor, or the "out-
  proxies" from I2P).
 
    zzalpha - 23 minutes ago
    So what are the benefits over Tor?
 
      HelloNurse - 5 minutes ago
      It seems intended to be more anonymous and decentralized than
      Tor, and safer thanks to the strength of numbers, but their
      whitepaper is diseharteningly incomplete and disingenuous,
      particularly about problems that are shared with Tor.For
      example:"The distribution of Entry Nodes is a difficult
      topic.  If oppressive governments are able to access this
      list, they will block user?s abilities to access the list."Or
      simply, you know, go after whoever runs entry nodes. Or run
      their own entry nodes and, even if they can't compromise the
      network, trace the evil cypherpunks who want to use
      encryption.Unfortunately, some practical and political
      problems cannot be solved with improved cryptography.
 
natch - 31 minutes ago
Very interesting. Visited Noisebridge a while back and there was a
post on the door telling visitors what to do when the FBI visits to
ask about the TOR exit node. I wonder how this tool avoids the exit
node problem.Also, from the FAQ:>Can't NSA just hack into this
too?>No. Because of its fully decentralized approach, distributed
architecture, and the size of the global network, Orchid cannot be
easily hacked by any single government or entity.That's not really
a satisfactory answer. First, it doesn't answer the question. The
question was not "can NSA easily hack into this." And I don't think
the NSA is necessarily deterred by something being not easy. The
bar needs to be higher than not easy, even if "not easy" is a
polite understatement. Also relying on the size of the network
means there is a bootstrapping problem, right? Hopefully they will
get there.This doesn't mean the system is bad... I'm just saying
the FAQ answer is bad.On the positive side, given the cred of some
of the people involved (saurik!) I am optimistic this may well have
a shot at working.
 
  saurik - 26 minutes ago
  Ugh. FWIW: we agree. That FAQ answer was rewritten, and it failed
  to go on the website.Here is the updated text that was written a
  couple nights ago by one of the people who helped design the
  protocol with me after being confused by the answer on the
  website.> Yes. Our initial release targets China as the
  adversary, which is a more tractable problem. We may implment
  full Chaumian mixes in the future (which are immune to
  metadata/traffic analysis), but they are unlikely to be complete
  for our first public release.
 
dharma1 - 23 minutes ago
the project seems very cool. related:
https://medium.com/@stevewaterhouse/how-token-sales-can-be-a...
 
jampekka - 9 minutes ago
So the business plan is to become the oligarchs of the new network?
 
  g_simonsson - moments ago
  Hopefully not! Ideally token allocations are fair and do not skew
  ownership towards any individual or entity while still providing
  good incentives (we're still working on figuring out what good
  allocations look like)