GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-28) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Delaware's Odd, Beautiful, Contentious, Private Utopia
78 points by jamesbowman
http://reason.com/archives/2017/10/14/delawares-odd-beautiful-co...
___________________________________________________________________
 
LVTfan - 1 hours ago
As a part time resident, and a passionate Georgist, I love the
Ardens.  The three villages function separately for governance, but
socially they're one, and there is a lot going on. The history is
fascinating. (If you have access to newspapers.com, read it
chronologically.  I'm still working through it.)  If you're in the
area in early September, don't miss the Arden Fair.
 
  mlinksva - 1 hours ago
  Did you move for your passion, or did you learn your passion from
  living there?If you have the inclination, please add references
  to the relevant Wikipedia articles as you read old news! Thank
  you. :)
 
    LVTfan - 59 minutes ago
    I moved there because it was lovely, and was consistent with
    something I have long felt strongly about.  My late
    grandparents were lifelong Georgists, and never mentioned the
    Ardens to me.  (I'm a late-bloomer -- I shared their perception
    of the problems, but kept thinking there had to be another way
    to solve them; when I failed to find it, I looked more closely
    at what Henry George had to say, and found it very persuasive.)
    For a recent article, look at Michael Kinsley's, in the
    September Vanity Fair.   But people from across many spectra
    embrace George's analysis and George's remedy; it is a third
    way, coming out of the traditions of classical economics, not
    the neo-classical economics that is widely taught
    today.George's most famous book was entitled "Progress and
    Poverty" ... it was dedicated, "to those who, seeing the vice
    and misery that spring from the unequal distribution of wealth
    and privilege, feel the possibility of a higher social state
    and would strive for its attainment."  Its subtitle is a
    mouthful:"an inquiry into the cause of industrial depressions
    and of increase of want with increase of wealth ... The
    Remedy."The book is quite analytical, a logical analysis.  If
    you want to see where it is going, jump to the final "book"
    before you read the rest.Or you might start with a collection
    of essays entitled "Social Problems."  They still read well
    today, and, among other things, show why a Constitution written
    in the 18th century simply can't be frozen in time, and needs
    to be reconsidered in light of 21st century realities.    Some
    of my favorite quotes are from "Social Problems."Both books are
    online and at Amazon or schalkenbach.org; there is also a fine
    modern abridgment of P&P, and audio is available at
    hgchicago.org.
 
      mlinksva - 29 minutes ago
      I've read Progress and Poverty and much more by still living
      Georgists (eg Polly Cleveland and Mason Gaffney). I'm pro-
      LVT.Your response however typifies one reason I'd never call
      myself a Georgist -- people who call themselves such come off
      as believing they've discovered the single truth that obtains
      social salvation, ie religious nuts -- who need to dump that
      single truth on people they encounter at the first
      opportunity. Seriously, if you want to be effective, and I
      want you to be, please tone it down.Thank you very much for
      sharing your experience in the fist 3 sentences of your
      comment. That's what I was hoping to learn!
 
jawbone3 - 2 hours ago
> "The idea that children could be out without a parent hovering
was just completely unknown to them," Macklem recalls. "And the
fact that the kids talked to someone who they obviously knew but
who was not a parent."I didn?t know the situation in the US was
quite so dystopical that kids on their own was any surprise...
 
  tehabe - 1 hours ago
  Somewhere was a piece by an American mother, who moved to Berlin
  and was surprised that free range parenting wasn't a movement
  there but the norm.A couple of years ago, I was extremely
  surprised about a 16 year old who said they wouldn't go an event
  w/o their parents. At 16 I wouldn't have gone to an event with a
  parent.
 
  ghaff - 51 minutes ago
  While there has been somewhat of a shift over time, it's also
  worth observing that the reason there can be a number of links to
  news stories in this thread is that they're often "man bites
  dog." Outside of maybe some trend stories, CNN doesn't generally
  do stories on routine everyday occurrences.
 
  crooked-v - 2 hours ago
  http://www.cnn.com/2015/01/20/living/feat-md-free-range-
  pare...http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/31/living/florida-mom-arrested-
  so...http://reason.com/blog/2016/04/07/mom-arrested-for-
  letting-k...
 
    qznc - 31 minutes ago
    Wow. This is not a single police weirdo. This is three
    different states. Ok, it is not normal otherwise it would not
    be in the news. Still, moving to the US became scarier to me
    (and Silicon Valley is tempting).For a contrast, I'm in
    Germany. My oldest son will go to school next year. It is
    considered normal to train him now to go to and from
    kindergarten alone. The biggest perceived danger is crossing
    roads.The kid of an acquaintance uses the tram for a few stops
    on the way to school. The first week in first grade the mother
    escorted her. Then she was on her own. Not alone though. The
    tram is packed with kids and they look out for each other (more
    or less, they are still kids).Still, we also see that
    congestion at schools is increasingly a problem. More and more
    parents seem to drop of their kids at school.
 
  maxxxxx - 2 hours ago
  Where I live you almost never see kids alone. They get dropped
  off by car at school, when they take the school bus the parents
  wait in the car until the bus has left.
 
  cydonian_monk - 2 hours ago
  Kids being unsupervised is a good way to get arrested for
  endangerment in many parts of this country, or at least result in
  an investigation by authorities such as child protective
  services. This [0] is the most widely cited recent example, but
  this idea is widespread and by no means limited to Maryland.Even
  when I was growing up 30 years ago in a not-quite-as-urban part
  of the country, me being alone would occasionally result in a
  call.0: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/maryland-
  coup...
 
    dsfyu404ed - 24 minutes ago
    This.The wide authority given to CPS doesn't help either. If
    you come to their attention the CPS  will be  a terrible
    nuisance, waste your time in court and maybe take your kid.  A
    lot of parents probably would give their kids more freedom if
    they weren't one busybody with a cell phone away from being on
    CPS bad list.It's one of the many issues that comes back to
    people trying to exert unnecessary control over others, "you
    shouldn't be raising your kid that way" and so on.
 
[deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
sutble - 2 hours ago
>After the prisoners' sentences were completed, the town celebrated
with a circus. The performance included an arrest of its own: A
clown dressed as a cop entered the audience, grabbed a surprised
Sinclair, and marched him away from the show.Surely the author
meant to write a cop dressed as a clown?
 
  ISKthrow - 1 hours ago
  Wat? No, a cown dressed like a cop. Pretty explicit. A cop
  dressed as a clown would not be recognized for anything else than
  a clown. A clown dressed as a cop will be seen as a clown dressed
  as a cop. Or maybe I'm crazy...
 
  bmelton - 1 hours ago
  The previous paragraphs insist that they had no police
  department, so unless they skipped or abridged the timetable, it
  seems most likely that it was a clown dressed as a cop.
 
neogodless - 2 hours ago
Well that was odd. Tried to read page two on my Android Oreo
device, had "virus" like alerts springing up. Sorry, this is off
topic, but I think there's reason to suspect that web page.
 
  trav4225 - 2 hours ago
  Lots of reasonably decent sites seem to participate in ad
  networks that apparently allow malicious ads that hijack
  browsers...  It's not clear to me why this is still an unsolved
  problem after so many years... :-/
 
    SomeStupidPoint - 1 hours ago
    Because the profits from serving the malware are concentrated
    while the harm is diffuse.
 
Animats - 2 hours ago
I knew about Freehope, which is another single-tax community. But
not this one.
 
wonder_er - 3 hours ago
While I might not want to live in Arden, I love the experimental
approach to self-organization.I feel like a dozen of similar
experimental communities allowed to succeed or fail, and they might
bubble up some useful heuristics for how cities/towns organize
themselves.I feel like the dominant model of town organization in
the USA leaves much to be desired.
 
  mlinksva - 2 hours ago
  There are many. Success among them seems to mean longevity, not
  scale.
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Intentional_communiti...
  (on English Wikipedia, the article about Arden is in a sub-sub-
  category of this one).Reading the Strong Towns site for awhile
  about the "traditional development pattern"
  https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/?tag=traditional+develop...
  ie cities and towns wordwide pre-car makes me think that whatever
  idiosyncratic motivations for various intentional communities, in
  form they're just following the traditional development
  pattern.There's no need for idiosyncratic experimentation to take
  and apply everywhere lessons from millennia of human settlements
  that we've strayed from in the car era.I'm a fan of idiosyncratic
  experimentation but see zero evidence of potential (because of
  tiny scale) or need (above) for bubbling up of heuristics from
  them.
 
  gumby - 2 hours ago
  > I feel like the dominant model of town organization in the USA
  leaves much to be desired.What is that dominant model?I've lived
  in Massachusetts and California.  In both states what's common is
  that the town decides (pretty much "has decided" at this point,
  esp in Mass) to organize itself, writes a local charter, and has
  local folks run a council.  Town hall meetings are open to
  everyone.  The council members are amateurs.  School districts
  and utility self govern and are rarely completely coextensional
  with towns.This can go wrong, of course, for example in Palo Alto
  the city managers weren't given enough oversight and overstaffed
  with middle managers; also real estate interests can take over
  the council for a while.  But by an large it's not that different
  in principle.In California, in fact, most of the state isn't part
  of organized towns; most "towns" are just vaguely defined areas
  under the county rules; various groups do things like run a water
  utility, manage the local park, etc.  In fact barely a quarter of
  the counties have charters; most themselves run under default
  state rules.  So that's much closer to the Arden idea.
 
    mlinksva - 2 hours ago
    I'm with you right up to the last sentence. Isn't minimizing
    private rents from land ownership central to the "Arden idea"?
    I don't see that anywhere in the organization of California
    jurisdictions.
 
    KGIII - 2 hours ago
    Indeed, it's quite a rarity to find an unincorporated township
    in New England. Mine is just a letter. The rules are pretty
    minimal, the municipal services do not exist, and the large
    animals vastly outnumber the people.I read this article and was
    fascinated. I will visit there in my next expression of
    wanderlust. What a curious place.
 
  52-6F-62 - 2 hours ago
  I imagine its population-dependent to some extent. I had never
  heard of Arden before this post and by god it looks beautiful.It
  seems important to note that it's population is ~439-450 people.
  I'm not in disagreement, though. I grew up in a small town
  (~4500-6000 people throughout my life there) and it had a mixed
  population between hardline skilled and unskilled labour in the
  steel and fishing industries, bikers, and aging hippies - as well
  as a small subsection of Government of Canada and University of
  Guelph environmental scientists. There was a notable difference
  in opinions for that reason.I imagine its simpler at this point
  in time to run a village society in that way with a group of
  like-minded, read people. Other kinds of lives lived by people
  tend to inform other kinds of opinions: I work hard all day, I
  don't want to think about that kind of thing, I understand a
  hierarchy with firm structure, I like to know who the boss is,
  etc.I'm oversimplifying it for the sake of being concise, and I
  hope my point is coming across. Hopefully when the political
  temper settles a little, those kinds of conversations about how
  life can be better can resume.