GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Walmart will soon have robots roaming the aisles in 50 stores
95 points by hourislate
http://www.businessinsider.com/walmart-store-robot-program-expan...
ram-expands-2017-10?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+typepad%2Falleyinsider%2Fsilicon_alley_insider+
___________________________________________________________________
 
[deleted]
 
losteverything - 28 minutes ago
Doug Mcmillon said Wal-Mart reached total  maximum employment (sry
cant find quote) as in no net increase in associates.He also points
out when a "job goes away." often referring to improved convenience
for the customer. (i.e. pick up towers)Robots will always be
experimented with..
 
Overtonwindow - 1 hours ago
What will the People of Walmart make of this? Personally, I think
store robots like these don't really help much. A novelty at first,
I think the image of Walmart as a cheapskate on all things human,
will give the robot a negative reputation.
 
  659087 - 1 hours ago
  > What will the People of Walmart make of this?That depends
  entirely upon whether or not the robots can help deliver their "I
  thought it was just gas" bathroom babies.
 
  bamboozled - 43 minutes ago
  Some of them will probably be hired to walk around and greet
  customers, I noticed that on my last visit to Australia and NZ.A
  lot of major chains down there, since implementing self-service
  checkouts etc, now just employ people to be friendly and give the
  brand and store some kind of face. It was interesting.Kind of
  like hiring some warmth and personality for an otherwise cold and
  desolate warehouse.
 
    adventured - 28 minutes ago
    Walmart re-instituted its greeter system [1] in part for that
    reason. They're using a lot of elderly workers for it. Walmart
    found that just having greeters out front reduced their theft
    numbers meaningfully.[1] http://fortune.com/2016/05/04/walmart-
    brings-back-greeters-t...
 
forapurpose - 1 hours ago
I wonder why they settled on putting the cameras in robots that are
on the floor. Why not use cameras attached to the ceiling? If the
cameras need to move to get a good angle, they could move up and
down the aisle on tracks or Walmart could simply install more
cameras. If the ceiling is a bad angle, they could put them on the
floor under the shelving, or on top of the shelves, or in several
other places.None of those solutions need navigation, their
presences is more persistent, and the persistent visual could be
used for other purposes: 'Are we out of produce bags? Check camera
5b.' 'What is on the floor in aisle 8?'
 
  ryuker16 - 23 minutes ago
  They move those shelves and aisles around and every wal-mart I've
  seen has 50 ft ceilings.
 
  criddell - 1 hours ago
  The Walmart nearest me moves aisles around periodically. Aisle 8
  this week has halloween costumes, but two weeks from now aisle 8
  will be gone and a large open area will be created for plastic
  Christmas trees.
 
  pwinnski - 9 minutes ago
  Flexibility.Everything you're describing has more limitations
  than putting a mobile robot on the floor, and the robots require
  no additional accommodations in store design.
 
noonespecial - 22 minutes ago
As cheap as cameras are these days, it would almost seem more cost
effective and reliable to just put a camera every few feet on the
opposite shelf.
 
  blt - 16 minutes ago
  Sure, but that doesn't help you get closer to a fully automated
  customer service bot. Probably this is just an initial step, the
  simplest thing that can still be useful, while gathering data and
  building expertise in the development team.
 
[deleted]
 
  [deleted]
 
  [deleted]
 
PatientTrades - 47 minutes ago
Walmarts are already overcrowded as it is. Adding robots is going
to clog the aisles even more. It could still work I guess
 
  rocketier - 8 minutes ago
  It is implied in the article, yes, but i dont see a reason why
  these robots shoudl not operate at closing hours or if it is a
  24/7 then at a time when the number of visitors is lowest, say 3
  or 4 am.
 
kristofferR - 47 minutes ago
Judging from the pictures they'll still use paper price labels.Why?
It seems extremely arcane to still use paper price labels in 2017,
especially for stores as big and centrally run as Walmart.With
digital price labels you can update prices centrally across the
whole country within seconds, and it costs basically nothing to
implement too, when the labor cost of manually updating paper price
labels are factored in.
 
  foobarrio - 29 minutes ago
  At the very least you will need another little robot or human
  that goes by and verifies that the prices have actually been
  updated. I can't imagine the LCD price displayers will be super
  high reliable and built to last decades.
 
    kristofferR - 18 minutes ago
    You seem to think that electronic price labels is a new
    unproven technology, while it is actually extremely common and
    well tested. After the initial introduction period, where
    errors can occur, it's pretty much guaranteed to work as
    flawless as it does everywhere
    else.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_shelf_label
 
  bbarn - 28 minutes ago
  Probably because it's the lowest common denominator across all
  states to follow codes.https://www.nist.gov/pml/weights-and-
  measures/us-retail-pric...A company the size of Walmart would
  need to employ many lawyers just to deal with state to state
  pricing laws.
 
  jdietrich - 12 minutes ago
  Shelves need to be checked, faced and re-stocked on a daily
  basis. Someone is already checking every shelf in the store every
  day, so the actual labour cost of changing paper price labels is
  remarkably small.Electronic shelf labels could facilitate dynamic
  price changes, but this is likely to be highly unpopular with
  customers. The mere presence of ESLs could imply volatile or
  manipulative pricing and undermine customer trust.
 
  BjoernKW - 11 minutes ago
  I suppose because modernising existing systems is tedious, error-
  prone and expensive. The latter two in principle apply to
  implementing new systems as well but at least those are exciting
  and, well, new.You'd be hard-pressed to find a single company
  that relies solely on digital processes. In terms of
  digitalisation everyone seems to be talking about AI, AR,
  robotics and technologies like Blockchain. However, while
  certainly  interesting those aren't the main avenues for bringing
  about digital transformation.Replacing paper-based processes and
  doing away with the need for physical presence to conduct
  business are.So, Walmart will soon have robots running up and
  down their aisles while at the same time we still largely rely on
  paper for invoicing and accounting.We'll soon have self-driving
  cars for all our wonderful commuting but we still haven't figured
  out how to use technology for remote working to make travelling
  to a ridiculously expensive place called 'office' a thing of the
  past.
 
  duderific - 42 minutes ago
  > and it costs basically nothing to implement too.I find that
  hard to believe, given the scale of Walmart's operations - they
  have close to 5000 stores, and who knows how much technical debt
  they have in their stocking/inventory systems.
 
    tradersam - 7 minutes ago
    Considering the fact that Walmart's last FY profits were
    something to the tune of $124.62B,[1] regardless of technical
    debt or other factors I don't think spending less than 1% of
    that to do a (probably) much needed upgrade is a hard sell to
    anyone rational.[1]: https://amigobulls.com/stocks/WMT/income-
    statement/annual
 
    kristofferR - 31 minutes ago
    I clarified that I meant with labor taken into account.I don't
    understand the technical debt argument though - if a robot can
    scan prices to check that they are correct, a display should be
    able to display the price without any issue. The prices are
    obviously accedible in a database.
 
anigbrowl - 1 hours ago
I wonder what their reaction will be when people start attaching
stickers to them
 
  adventured - 25 minutes ago
  Walmart has eyes in the sky covering every part of the consumer
  area of the building. I imagine they'll regard it as property
  vandalism (stickers being the least of what people will do to
  them).
 
phyzome - 45 minutes ago
> The robots are designed to free up store employees' time so they
can use it to help customers....which is bullshit; Walmart just
doesn't want the "robots taking our jobs" angle here. If they
consider the current level at which employees help customers in the
aisles sufficient, then they'll be cutting jobs to match that level
rather than "freeing up" employees to do more of it.
 
  JSONwebtoken - 38 minutes ago
  For the foreseable future, robots and chatbots will be poorer UX
  than speaking to a human. Since it's not adding value to their
  product it's obviously being done for cost cutting and scale
  reasons.
 
    jdietrich - 17 minutes ago
    I rarely get useful assistance in large chain stores. Asking
    "where is the pesto?" usually gets an answer like "I dunno,
    somewhere in aisle 7 maybe" with an indifferent shrug. I'd
    happily make three attempts at using a clunky voice interface
    if I got the answer "Aisle 7, bay 11, shelves 3 and 4. We have
    18 different kinds of pesto currently in stock. Would you like
    me to take you there?"It almost seems too obvious to say, but
    computers have different strengths and weaknesses to
    humans.There are also social factors involved that may be
    advantageous to machines. Self-checkout machines offer an
    objectively worse experience most of the time, but a lot of
    shoppers prefer them. Some customers don't want to interact
    with a human cashier. Some will be buying embarrassing items
    and prefer the apparent anonymity of self-checkout. There's
    also a subtlety in how the self-checkout machines are arranged
    - because there's usually a common queue for several machines,
    customers don't feel pressured to finish their transaction
    quickly.Shoppers may prefer being assisted by a robot for a
    variety of reasons, even if the robot isn't quite as good as
    the average human worker.
 
  paulddraper - 31 minutes ago
  > which is bullshit;  Walmart just doesn't want the "robots
  taking our jobs" angle hereSome would say the "robots taking our
  jobs" angle is also bullshit.Damn tractors/threshers/combines,
  taking all of our jobs....
 
frgtpsswrdlame - 1 hours ago
You guys think there will be a backlash to this? Some sort of
modern luddite movement? Whenever I shop I refuse to use the self-
checkout, you think that sort of thing might spread?
 
  bbarn - 24 minutes ago
  I think you're going to see a lot of kids knocking them over for
  fun, at least at first.
 
  irl_zebra - 1 hours ago
  Why do you refuse to use the self checkout?
 
    wtetzner - 1 hours ago
    I prefer self checkout in theory, but often the machine doesn't
    work properly, and you need a human to login and fix it
    anyway.The whole thing where it checks if something is in
    bagging area seems to be pretty buggy in most of the stores
    where I've used them.
 
    zajd - 1 hours ago
    I'm going to guess because of how symbolic it is regarding our
    society's relation to labor.
 
    frgtpsswrdlame - 1 hours ago
    People need those jobs so I want them to exist.
 
    dctoedt - 1 hours ago
    Can't answer for GP, but I use human checkout to provide
    epsilon demand for cashiers who need the job.  Efficiency isn't
    everything.
 
      meddlepal - 1 hours ago
      I used to feel that way about bank tellers (having been a
      former bank teller a long time ago...) then I realized I was
      wasting 20 minutes in line for a simple deposit that the
      machine could do in under two minutes without a queue.
 
        gt_ - 21 minutes ago
        The 20 minute wait was excused by your willingness to
        accept the offer of automation.I visited a Walmart last
        week and notice they had converted 1/3 of the normal
        checkout aisles to self-checkout stations. They left the
        conveyor belts in and I noticed how people still used the
        conveyor belts the same way whether there was a line or
        not, unloading each item onto it before scanning them all.
 
        frgtpsswrdlame - 1 hours ago
        Don't you feel a tinge of guilt when you walk in one day
        and now there's only two tellers instead of three? Maybe
        I'm just weird but I was at target yesterday and there were
        only three aisles open with lots of people going to self
        checkout. I said fuck it and waited in line for a person.
 
          maxerickson - 44 minutes ago
          Do you go down this rabbit hole?How do you pick between
          buying wheat and taking it to the miller (preserving his
          job) and buying flour from the grocer?Do you seek out gas
          stations that still pump gas for you?Do you worry that
          buying a fuel efficient vehicle or insulated building can
          have a negative impact on people working for energy
          producers?
 
          jdietrich - 10 minutes ago
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_broken_windo
          w
 
        dctoedt - 1 hours ago
        True; a 20-minute difference would definitely be enough to
        tip the scales in favor of self-service.  But in the
        grocery stores in our area, there are almost always plenty
        of registers open and little waiting.  So the time
        requirements being approximately equal, I'd rather pay a
        skilled cashier and bagger to do the work of speedily
        "ringing up" and bagging my groceries, while I stand there
        and chat with them.  (As a teenager I had a summer job
        bagging groceries one year, so I can relate.)
 
      criddell - 1 hours ago
      If there was a 1% service fee for using the cashier (or a 1%
      rebate for self-checkout), would you still use a cashier?
 
        dctoedt - 1 hours ago
        > If there was a 1% service fee for using the cashier (or a
        1% rebate for self-checkout), would you still use a
        cashier?Definitely.  Our average grocery bill ranges from
        maybe USD $50 to $125 (we're empty nesters), so 1% of that
        would be noise level.  Heck, back when baggers accepted
        tips, I always tipped at least $1 (when I was a teenaged
        grocery bagger it was for tips only); that's more than the
        1% would be.Probably
 
    dave5104 - 1 hours ago
    I don't use self checkout because I'm lazy, tbh. It's more work
    I need to do. Particularly at the grocery store I go to, I know
    which cashiers are good and efficient. If I have a coupon, or
    if I'm buying a clearance item, it's also not a big deal, but
    self checkout always seems to require a "help is on the way!"
 
    ryandrake - 1 hours ago
    Convenience/efficiency more than anything. Most of the time,
    human checkout is faster than self-checkout. I can prepare my
    payment in parallel with the human operating the checkout
    hardware. I don't have to learn and navigate the touch screen
    menu system (even if it can be learned in a second, that's one
    second more than the zero I get with human checkout). Often,
    self checkout kiosks fail in ways that require a human to be
    summoned anyway.
 
      icebraining - 2 minutes ago
      Prepare your payment? What's there to prepare?
 
    odammit - 1 hours ago
    Because I drink a lot.Can?t buy booze in self checkout (in CA).
 
      criddell - 1 hours ago
      I'm in Austin, TX and I can buy booze in self-checkout, as
      long as it isn't Sunday morning.
 
        rconti - 22 minutes ago
        Do they scan your ID? If not, I'm surprised someone hasn't
        come knocking about this...
 
          thinkythought - 12 minutes ago
          In washington you have to wait, a long time, for a clerk
          to come over and check your id and unlock the checkout
          machine. it's obnoxious
 
    elchief - 1 hours ago
    For one, Wal*Mart doesn't provide cash-back at self checkout
 
      losteverything - 33 minutes ago
      Yea it does...and people often forget to pick it up
 
  aaronbrethorst - 44 minutes ago
  If by "backlash" you mean 'looks like late 18th century France,'
  then yes, I think there will be a backlash.
 
  nitwit005 - 1 hours ago
  I think we'll just see a ton of videos of electric scooters
  crashing into them...
 
  Roodgorf - 1 hours ago
  Given the previous reactions to any sort of move by fast food
  chains toward anything like automation, I can't imagine this
  won't be picked up as fodder for the "look what happens when you
  ask for a living wage" contingent.
 
    criddell - 1 hours ago
    You don't think wages have any effect on the decision to
    automate?I will always vote for raising the minimum wage but at
    the same time I know it probably makes automation more
    attractive.
 
      Roodgorf - 1 hours ago
      I don't think it has as extreme an impact as the people
      posting images of a self-service menu imply it does. I will
      concede that a lot of my aversion to the argument is from the
      disdain for people with lower-class jobs that I read into
      it.But while I agree there is an impact, I also don't think
      we should avoid automation simply to have someone doing a
      mindless job if it could effectively be automated. People
      don't necessarily need jobs, they need the resources that
      having a job allows them access to.
 
  softwarefounder - 1 hours ago
  I love bagging my own groceries the way I like, and avoiding
  interaction with a potentially disgruntled and inattentive
  cashier. I love self-checkouts.
 
    jethro_tell - 23 minutes ago
    oh?  you don't want your bread to be a cushion for you bananas
    which are there to keep your canned goods from falling through
    the thin paper?
 
  [deleted]
 
UnoriginalGuy - 1 hours ago
I wonder if these robots will suffer from the "roomba dog mess"
problem. Meaning if a jar of something gets dropped in the aisle,
will the robot happily drive through it and then leave tracks of it
throughout the store?I'd also be interested in learning about the
false positives. For example a product get turned around on the
shelf or returned askew does that trigger an alert? And is that a
good or bad thing?I guess the proof will be in the pudding. If
these are still in use two or three years from now then we know
they were a success.From a personal perspective I'd love these to
improve me locate products within a store. Many stores still fail
to tell you which shelf a product is on on their mobile app, and
the few that day don't give you a map of the store showing you the
literal location of it. I'd love to have a "Google Maps"-like
experience with locating an item.
 
rapind - 1 hours ago
But can they do the cheer?
 
  [deleted]
 
alexS - 1 hours ago
Lets start an open robot cooperative where each co adopting robots
to replace human labor donates to high tech or other education.
This idea is open source so take it and run with it :)
 
timthelion - 1 hours ago
It seems interesting to me, that computers seem to be taking on
managerial roles and humans are left with manual labor. The robot
knows how to tell a human to fix a problem but doesn't know how to
restock the shelves itself. Similarly, in warehouses, computers
tell humans what to do, and the human's job is basically just to
grab things.In the end, the robot is already higher on the ladder
than the humans.
 
  otras - 1 hours ago
  Reminds of me of the Warren Bennis quote: The factory of the
  future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man
  will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the
  man from touching the equipment.
 
  zanny - 1 hours ago
  Its not that we cannot build robots that restock shelves, it is
  that shelves are designed for humans to stock. And emulating the
  range of movement and dexterity of human hands and the sensory
  data we get when interacting with such shelves is really
  expensive, rather than prohibitive. Especially to maintain. Think
  of all the fine motor joints you would need in such a robot that
  could break all the time (like how fragile human fingers are).
  But how else are they supposed to stock individual bottles of
  maple syrup with weird handles while stocking jars or bags of
  flour a shelf over?In situations designed for robots, like Amazon
  warehouses, they don't have a problem stocking shelves as long as
  the range of required behavior is much more restricted so the
  instrumentation can be more rugged and less articulate.
 
    apendleton - 1 hours ago
    The newer Amazon warehouses actually provide a nice example of
    some further refactoring to make at least parts of the stocking
    and picking more automate-able, in that the shelves all move
    and he humans stay stationary. Fingers are still hard, but
    moving across a warehouse is easy, so may as well shave off
    that piece of the task.
 
  simplify - 1 hours ago
  It's not too different from a static type system. Humans are
  great at general problem solving, but computers are better at
  precision (but only when you can precise measure something).
 
  davito88 - 1 hours ago
  I think this could be said for many technologies: the cashier
  scans barcodes, the cook at McDonalds flips burgers when the
  alarm goes off, the anesthesiologist or pilot watches gauges...
 
    timthelion - 1 hours ago
    And Uber tells the drivers where to go.
 
      ronilan - 1 hours ago
      Near my house, 4 red octagons with a simple white drawing
      command humans to stop and cooperate.
 
  tlb - 50 minutes ago
  Counting inventory and generating pick lists isn't really
  "managerial". The word usually means managing people, which still
  requires human judgement.
 
  panopticon - 1 hours ago
  Reminds me of this story: http://marshallbrain.com/manna1.htmI
  always thought it was amusing when people said it would replace
  burger flippers and the like. Why? They're cheap, and that's
  relatively expensive/difficult to automate. The slightly higher
  paid manager though? Ripe for automation.
 
    ryuker16 - 24 minutes ago
    Same here....I suspect it's middle and lower managers that will
    be first to be obliterated.Cashiers don't simple run the
    register, they do other stuff. Janitors fix stuff and carry
    heavy boxes, etc.Managers and supervisors? Overpaid if they're
    doing the above or doing something can be automated.
 
    gowld - 10 minutes ago
    > They're cheap, and that's relatively expensive/difficult to
    automate.that's a weird thing to say, because burger flippers
    ARE automated -- 99% of the work of making a McDonald's burger
    is already automated, only the remaining hard-to-automate 1% is
    left for the humans.
 
    timthelion - 58 minutes ago
    "The girls liked it because Manna didn't hit on them
    either."Interesting story. I'll be sure to read it.
 
  [deleted]
 
  PeachPlum - 1 hours ago
  Managers make decisions when the information is equivocal.That is
  very hard to replace.Resource allocation and unequivocal
  decisions are for the machines to help us with.If, as a manager,
  you do more of the latter: be afraid
 
    timthelion - 1 hours ago
    > If, as a manager, you do more of the latter: be afraidAs a
    gardener, I have never feared a robot that could pull weeds. As
    a home-maker I have never feared a robot that could wash
    dishes. As an inventor, I have never feared a robot that could
    draft diagrams. And yet those people who are at the mercy of
    the market fear, and this is why, I believe that capitalism is
    headed for either disaster or elimination. Capitalism has
    created a problem which does not exist.Post-scarcity is only a
    problem in capitalism.
 
      noonespecial - 27 minutes ago
      I'll take it. Because "how to fairly distribute all of this
      stuff that nobody had to work to make(1)" is a better problem
      than the one it replaced: "how to choose who should die
      because we don't have enough".(1) Just so long as the answer
      isn't "make them die because we don't need them anymore".
 
      castle-bravo - 44 minutes ago
      ... because only capitalism has made post-scarcity possible.
 
  sbinthree - 1 hours ago
  More like: humans who program the robots > the robots > humans
  who are instructed by the robots.
 
  jasode - 33 minutes ago
  >The robot knows how to tell a human to fix a problem but doesn't
  know how to restock the shelves itself. [...] computers tell
  humans what to do, and the human's job is basically just to grab
  things.Yep.  There's a name for that observation:
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moravec%27s_paradox
 
devon_m - 1 hours ago
and the race is on to squat on https://www.robotsofwalmart.com
 
  practicalcat - 1 hours ago
  still available
 
goodroot - 34 minutes ago
> The robots are much more efficient than a human at the task of
scanning store shelves.Oh, my. This sentence gave me a real
chuckle. But, then, I reflected. We're in for some interesting
times. If the heuristic is whether not a robot is "more efficient"
than a human then human's are going to be in short demand.
 
Isamu - 1 hours ago
> the robots are 50% more efficient than a human doing the same
task. They can also scan shelves three times more quickly and are a
lot more accurate. Human employees can only scan shelves about
twice a week.Personally, I want to see up-to-date retail stock
mapping (that I can search)Walmart is testing a robot from Bossa
Nova (Pittsburgh and
SF)http://www.bossanova.com/https://www.crunchbase.com/organization
/bossa-nova-robotics-...
 
  woobar - 25 minutes ago
  > Personally, I want to see up-to-date retail stock mapping (that
  I can search)Just got from Lowes and they do it on the web and in
  their app. Search for an item, and if it is in stock it will show
  you its location on the store map.OTOH, every Walmart I've visted
  is unable to keep their shelves full. [1] How hard it is to keep
  something non-perishable (like deodorant) in stock? Somehow
  Target figured that out.[1] https://consumerist.com/2013/04/05
  /walmart-employees-tell-co...
 
    monkmartinez - 14 minutes ago
    Anecdote time!I bought a water softener at HomeDepot about
    three weeks ago. Initially went to my local Lowes where I had
    checked if one was in stock and at the store. Yes and Yes. Get
    to Lowes and there is no water softener, as the website
    indicated. Lowe's employee checked the back as well, wasn't
    there.There are many problems with humans doing this "inventory
    business" at $10 an hour or so. The professional counts that
    happen once or so a year by outside agencies wouldn't be
    necessary otherwise.To be fair, I've had issues at Home Depot
    as well... lots of; "The computer says there are 2 in stock...
    I have no idea where they are."
 
      woobar - 1 minutes ago
      Yeah, it isn't perfect. Sometimes I see more variety on the
      shelves then was reported by the search results. But my
      primary use case is the store map. It is so easy to get lost
      in Lowes/Home Depot.
 
  ikeboy - 52 minutes ago
  Brickseek?
 
  comboy - 1 hours ago
  Why does it have to be a robot riding around? Couldn't the same
  thing be done from a camera on the ceiling?
 
    maxerickson - 49 minutes ago
    They already do it at POS.Lots of store websites have a feature
    where you select a location and it tells you whether a product
    is in stock or not (and often how much is in stock).
 
    Operyl - 1 hours ago
    Because robots look cooler. Also, I imagine it?s probably doing
    some stuff with depth perception crap and what have you.
 
    arkitaip - 1 hours ago
    But then you would have to spend lots of money of redesigning
    ceilings, having regular maintenance work done, etc.
 
    markkanof - 1 hours ago
    It would probably mean that the camera would either have to
    hang down pretty low in the isles or the isles would need to be
    super wide so that the camera could get a good view angle of
    the entire shelf, including bottom rows. But sure I suppose
    they probably could have something that rides around on a track
    on the ceiling and raises and lowers to get into position in
    each isle.
 
  hk__2 - 1 hours ago
  > Personally, I want to see up-to-date retail stock mapping (that
  I can search)Isn?t something Walmart doesn?t want you to have?
  Having a mapping means being more efficient when shopping in the
  store, which means less time in it and so less opportunities to
  buy things.
 
    fossuser - 1 hours ago
    This reminds me of the argument some (now dead) portal
    page/search engine company made to Larry Page when Larry and
    Sergey showed off their page rank algorithm.It was basically
    something like the following: "This is no good - if the search
    results are too good then people won't stay on our page long
    enough to see the ads"This is basically what triggered them to
    start their own company instead of licensing the tech (I'm
    remembering most of this from In The Plex which I read a while
    back).Basically it's stupid not to make the core thing better -
    especially in the case where Walmart's real competition is
    Amazon.
 
    ask_hn_54321 - 31 minutes ago
    From iOS and Android apps you can search a for products in a
    specific store. It displays Aisle number and some broad stock
    information. Maps have been trialed as well. There are
    challenges with data quality to get maps to work well. Poor
    data quality is due to managers being able to move shelves
    around without updating central systems and stock living in
    multiple places within a store (same SKU). Locating consumers
    on a map has also been trialed with LED based indoor
    positioning. Walmart do try lots of stuff and work with lots of
    vendors. Rolling out to 4000+ stores is a multi-year challenge.
    See eReceipts, Savings Catcher, Scan'n'Go, Walmart Pay et al.
    Usually 3 years from pilot to chain.
 
  Bromskloss - 34 minutes ago
  > http://www.bossanova.com/Oh no, it's _ugly_!
 
Animats - 1 hours ago
I went to a presentation in SF about three years ago where someone
was demoing an inventory robot like that. Same company?