GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Amazon.com Announces Third Quarter Sales Up 34% to $43.7B
124 points by runesoerensen
http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=176060&p=irol-newsAr...
___________________________________________________________________
 
pfarnsworth - 1 hours ago
Wow.  34%?  How does that happen at a company of that scale?
That's simply incredible, they are hitting it out of the park like
Apple and Google, FANGs are dominating this world at this stage.
 
0xFFC - 1 hours ago
I am very curious about Wallmart policies against Amazon growth.
With this pace amazon will eat Wallmart eventually. And Wallmart is
biggest company on earth. What they are going to do?
 
  bognition - 1 hours ago
  In many ways amazon has already eaten walmart. In what way is
  walmart the biggest company on the earth?
 
    Nelkins - 54 minutes ago
    It's the largest company by revenue [1] and employee count
    [2].[1] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_largest_compani
    es_by...[2]
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_largest_employers?wp...
 
    sethev - 54 minutes ago
    Revenue and number of employees
 
    [deleted]
 
    iampims - 52 minutes ago
    Headcount I believe.
 
    pwinnski - 42 minutes ago
    Walmart isn't the biggest company on earth by most means.Last
    quarter, Walmart reported $31.8B profits on $123.4B earnings.
    For the similar quarter, Amazon reported $14.5B profits on
    $38.0B earnings. So Walmart dwarfed Amazon overall.Amazon's
    fresh results are great, and it helps to close the gap between
    them, but they are still much smaller than Walmart.Unless
    you're talking online-only, in which case the comparison switch
    around, and Amazon is already much bigger than Walmart. But
    Walmart's online sales are a small percent of their earnings.
 
  adventured - 17 minutes ago
  Walmart's online business is booming and its offline retail
  business is still four times the size of Amazon's retail
  business. Walmart's online retail business is about 30% the size
  of Amazon's and growing twice as fast. Walmart apparently isn't
  going quietly."The discount chain reported on Thursday that U.S.
  online sales rose a staggering 63% in the first fiscal quarter of
  the year, following last year?s overhaul of its online
  marketplace"http://fortune.com/2017/05/18/walmart-online/"Wal-
  Mart?s e-commerce sales grew an impressive 60% y-o-y in Q2."https
  ://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2017/08/18/e-...
 
austenallred - 2 hours ago
Wow. How is that even possible?Growing by a third in one year at
that scale is completely mind boggling to me.
 
  leggomylibro - 1 hours ago
  Anecdotally, I've started using Amazon FBA for things that I used
  to use eBay for.Say I want a 2.2" ILI9341-driven TFT screen.
  That's not exactly something that you need everyday, so I could
  go to AliExpress/Taobao and get N for $3 ea in ~3 weeks, or eBay
  to get one for $4-5 in a lottery of anywhere from 3 days to 2
  months. But now, I can get one from Amazon for $10 tomorrow.It
  has prime shipping, which means you gotta figure they use the
  whole 'Fulfilled By Amazon' thing; I think that's like $3 a pop
  for small items. Heck, I was thinking of trying to make some
  money off of that kind of arbitrage, but it wouldn't be stable
  income since it's so dependent on a single 3rd-party company.
  Also, you'd literally be profiting off of China's sweatshop
  factories and lack of compunction around IP, which I feel sort of
  'eh' about. At least using the things, you can argue there might
  be an end to justify the mildly shady means.And it's just as
  likely to work as one from those other sources. If I wanted
  ethically-sourced reliable hardware I'd pay like $40 to get one
  with fast shipping from Adafruit. I really appreciate all that
  they do, but I also can't afford to ignore price for every
  purchasing decision that I make - and I am definitely not alone
  there, so there's probably still a lot of benefit to being "the
  everything store."
 
    ryandrake - 1 hours ago
    Interesting--I've found myself switching the other way
    recently. I used to do a lot of purchasing on Amazon, but have
    moved more and more over to eBay. Prices tend to be better
    there, even on new items. No sales tax. Most sellers now offer
    free shipping, and you don't have to fill your cart to $50 or
    whatever it is to get it, and that free shipping isn't the
    "carried on the back of a mule" speed like Amazon's.
 
      leggomylibro - 42 minutes ago
      I can definitely see that; if you didn't have prime shipping,
      and more importantly imo, didn't live in a huge city where
      tons of items are deliverable to a plethora of nearby
      'lockers' with 24-48-hour delivery. That probably has a lot
      to do with it, along with my experience that ebay is still
      pretty 'back of the mule' with shipping electronics
      internationally. Sometimes it's fast, but usually I forget I
      ordered something before it arrives.But I do also order
      larger quantities of things from China, when I can plan
      ahead. I go to Amazon when I can't plan ahead, and more
      frequently these days, to get a working reference
      implementation up and running before I start running around
      making a BOM for a prototype. It's amazing how much time and
      money that can save you.
 
      sokoloff - 1 hours ago
      Me too. I still buy a fair bit from Amazon, but a lot of my
      purchasing has moved to Ebay and Aliexpress.It used to be the
      case that Amazon was very rarely significantly undersold.
      Starting ~3 years ago, I started to find that Amazon was
      somewhat frequently undersold by enough that I was willing to
      wait for Ebay or Ali (or camelcamelcamel to email me an
      Amazon price drop).I think Amazon's current positioning is
      more profitable for them and makes me happy as an investor in
      AMZN, but as a consumer, it makes me Google shop more often
      than before.
 
  outside1234 - 1 hours ago
  They have no profit.  Color me unimpressed.
 
    brad0 - 52 minutes ago
    This is an unconvincing statement. Amazon is known for
    reinvesting all their revenue back into the company. That?s why
    their stock price was low for so long.
 
  newobj - 2 hours ago
  International, and unclear if subsidiaries like WFM come into
  play in this?
 
    adventured - 2 hours ago
    They note in the release that Whole Foods accounted for $1.3
    billion in sales. Excluding Whole Foods sales and favorable
    exchange rates, growth was 29%.
 
    kgwgk - 1 hours ago
    International was actually a drag (29% compared to North
    America 35% and AWS 42%) Edit: but I guess I should exclude
    Whole Foods and in that case North America growth is 28%.
 
  gyrccc - 2 hours ago
  > Excluding Whole Foods Market and the $124 million favorable
  impact from year-over-year changes in foreign exchange rates
  throughout the quarter, net sales increased 29% compared with
  third quarter 2016.Still a really impressive 29% without taking
  WF into account.
 
  tyingq - 2 hours ago
  It's not far off from their old
  trajectory:https://ycharts.com/companies/AMZN/revenuesThe Whole
  Foods acquisition did add a billion, so that helps.
 
  eliben - 1 hours ago
  Aren't very high sales for a store expected? They don't
  manufacture (most) stuff - they buy it for X, sell it for X+Y%,
  so better economy = more consumer spending = higher sales for
  stores. The real key for Amazon is how good their profit margins
  are on these sales.
 
    jdale27 - 1 hours ago
    Is the economy so much better than last year that everyone is
    buying 34% more stuff than they did last year?
 
    austenallred - 1 hours ago
    They were a store last year, too.
 
[deleted]
 
adventured - 2 hours ago
For AWS - 41.7% year over year sales growth (to $4.58b), 44%
increase in operating expenses, 36% increase in operating income
(to $1.17b).
 
gok - 2 hours ago
"Operating income decreased 40%"
 
  kgwgk - 1 hours ago
  Operating margin has collapsed from 1.8% to 0.8% (adjusting for
  Whole Foods doesn't change the result).
 
    gok - 1 hours ago
    If you exclude AWS, it's -2.1%, from -0.9% a year ago
 
rgbrenner - 2 hours ago
Once again, AWS is the reason Amazon made any money at all. AWS
earned $1.1B in profits for the quarter.. a 25% profit margin.
 
  tdb7893 - 2 hours ago
  Hopefully with Microsoft and Google getting in the game we'll get
  some competition and that margin will reduce
 
    davidkuhta - 2 hours ago
    ... or that the margin stays the same, and they're able to
    further innovate and offer additional value!
 
    Analemma_ - 1 minutes ago
    I don't know... on Microsoft's earnings call today, a couple of
    finance suits specifically asked them about how they intend to
    grow cloud margins, so I don't think this is incoming.
    Amazon/Microsoft/Google tried a brief cloud price war a few
    years back and it all led to them being right back where they
    started, so I wonder if there's a MAD-ish incentive not to do
    that again.
 
    rajnathani - 1 hours ago
    MSFT also had earnings today. They beat with a (sustained)
    strong growth in their cloud biz.
 
    s17n - 1 hours ago
    Question is whether those companies will culturally be able to
    compete in a low-margin space.  I don't know anything about
    Microsoft but wrt Google I've often thought that the insane
    margins on the search ads business have made it institutionally
    difficult for the company to take any low-margin business
    seriously.  Amazon on the other hand has been all about razor
    thin margins since day one.
 
  mistermann - 2 hours ago
  Not making money is a conscious choice.Growing this fast at scale
  is insane, Amazon scares me.
 
    hobofan - 1 hours ago
    Out of all the big ones Amazon is the one I'd want the least to
    make much money. They just seem to have the least human view of
    their customers, with some products they've built completely
    centered around viewing their customers as consumer-machines.
 
      whoisjuan - 12 minutes ago
      Compared to Apple that artificially created a consumption
      cycle of one 700 USD (Now 1000 USD) device per year?
 
  alehul - 1 hours ago
  Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that just due to their
  accounting preferences?Amazon has had the capability of making
  profit for years, but prefers to expense everything off in an
  effort to grow rather than pay increased taxes.Their skyrocketing
  market cap hasn't been due to a change in the company's direction
  so much as investors gradually realizing this strategy and the
  raw growth potential of where Amazon has positioned itself.
 
    jgalt212 - 1 hours ago
    perhaps, but AWS is so profitable even AMZN cannot reinvest all
    its proceeds.
 
    kgwgk - 1 hours ago
    > prefers to expense everything offWhat does that mean?
 
      adventured - 1 hours ago
      I think the parent means, they prefer to aggressively spend
      their cash flow on growth rather than produce a nice taxable
      income figure. It's an odd way to phrase it, one wouldn't use
      "expense everything off" in that way normally.
 
      alehul - 1 hours ago
      The sibling comment regarding avoiding a taxable income is
      correct.When a company makes a profit, it pays taxes on that
      income. The dividends are then either 1. distributed
      proportionally to the shareholders, or 2. reinvested into the
      company.The general idea is that reinvestment will generate
      more profit in the long term. In this case, the company
      reinvests the income into operations and growth during the
      next fiscal period and onwards. This method of reinvestment,
      however, still requires some taxes to be paid on the
      income.As an alternative, a company can fill their income
      statement each quarter with expenses that will ~match their
      income. This way, they're essentially reinvesting in their
      operations and growth just the same, however they don't have
      to pay the taxes if the expenses are generated in the same
      quarter. This method makes the company look unprofitable, but
      in reality is merely an accounting choice (and arguably, a
      good one).A random article I found that explains some of the
      strategy: http://www.businessinsider.com/analysts-wrong-
      about-amazon-p...
 
        kgwgk - 15 minutes ago
        Good luck getting the IRS to accept that "good" accounting
        choice. In fact the reported statements can be different
        from those used to calculate the actual taxes paid. But
        even if the SEC is more flexible, there are still limits on
        what can be done. They are still reporting capex much
        higher than net income, if they expensed everything off
        they would be reporting billions in losses every quarter.
 
      alexbeloi - 1 hours ago
      There are different accounting strategies for when you
      recognize income/expenses.Say you land a long term contract
      to provide a service for 5 years and you need to buy extra
      hardware to fulfill this service, you can choose to expense
      the hardware immediately in the first year while you let the
      earnings come in over the next 5 years. In the first year you
      would be taking a huge loss (on paper), and in the following
      four years you would see larger than average profits (on
      paper).Alternatively, you could acknowledge the full value of
      the contract immediately. Or another alternative is to
      expense the hardware over time.I'm not an accountant, but
      this analogy is my basic understanding of the flexibility
      that companies have.
 
    [deleted]
 
  adventured - 1 hours ago
  Their business outside of AWS is generating immense cash flow.
  That's a lot more important to Amazon's business than most
  headline measures of profitability. Overall they produced $8.1
  billion in free cash flow for the prior 12 months and $17.1
  billion of operating cash flow. That's what enables them to
  continue to invest so heavily.
 
Chris911 - 1 hours ago
The stock is up 7.5% in after hours trading.
 
davidkuhta - 2 hours ago
So, how much do they have to spend to stay "zero-profit"?
 
jedberg - 1 hours ago
That was me and my wife.  I'm pretty sure our baby stuff accounts
for most of that growth.
 
  Waterluvian - 7 minutes ago
  Same! I've never used amazon as much as I have in the past 8
  months when the firstborn arrived.And congrats!
 
  j_s - 1 hours ago
  Congratulations!
 
  lettergram - 1 hours ago
  Gratz!lol My wife and I just added our own registry there...
 
    jedberg - 1 hours ago
    Protip.  Put expensive stuff you want for yourself on the
    registry.  It's unlikely that anyone will buy it (but hey if
    they do great!) but after the due date they send you a coupon
    for 20% off if you buy everything left on your registry.We got
    a bunch of lego sets for the older kid that way, and the
    discount counted!
 
      sf_rob - 1 hours ago
      Now I want to set up a registry and pay my family to buy the
      cheaper items to try to get the coupon...
 
        jedberg - 1 hours ago
        I'm sure you wouldn't be the first.