GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
eBay launches visual search tools that let you shop using photos
93 points by dayve
https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/26/ebay-launches-visual-search-to...
___________________________________________________________________
 
searchers - 6 hours ago
As I understood, there are 2 different apps: "Find it" and "Image
search". If yes, .. why?
 
dboreham - 6 hours ago
My pet startup idea, going back I suppose 15+ years is a service
that does this:You have something. You like it. You want another
one. The service gets it for you. This doesn't have to work from a
picture -- it could use a UPC barcode or a text description.Idea
originally inspired by a school friends of mine who wore the exact
same type of boots for years and years. When the old pair wore out,
he'd buy another pair the exact same.Over the years I've noticed
many instances where I really want another one of something I have
but it turns out to be either painful or impossible to find. You
know however that somewhere someone has a warehouse full of the
things.Also like the electronics industry brokers who can track
down an old component for you to repair gear or re-start
manufacturing on some old product. Those have existed since at
least the 1970's.A few years ago I tested Amazon's visual product
search feature to see if it would do what I wanted. It didn't. I
showed an image of some brown boots I was wearing, and certainly
the suggested products were also brown boots, but not the same
kind.
 
  whoisjuan - 5 hours ago
  I would totally use this. 8 years ago I bought a pair of Nike
  shoes in Paris. I loved those shoes. I tried millions of things
  to buy a similar pair but I was unsuccessful at finding
  them.Maybe the service should be like FlightFox, but for people
  who are really good at finding stuff. You pay a commission to the
  individual who helps you find the item.
 
    thess24 - 2 hours ago
    I've been building an automated service very similar to this
    for womens fashion (mens fashion soon) in my free time over the
    past 5 months using deep learning.  The goal is to index
    existing items, and then expand to items that are no longer
    available.  So you could take a picture of your
    shoes/shirt/hat/etc and it would ideally find the same one. If
    it doesn't find the same exact item, it would find similar
    items at different price points that you could buy.  Getting
    similar items isn't that hard -- getting the exact item is much
    trickier though.  With the pace of improvement in these types
    of models, there will probably be a lot of these types of apps
    popping up over the next few years.
 
  51Cards - 5 hours ago
  I would use a service like this.  I am similar to your friend...
  When I find a product that I like I'm good with getting more of
  the exact same in future vs. bouncing around through other
  brands. I have another Bluetooth headset still in box for when
  this one dies for example.  Usually when this happens it's eBay I
  turn to (or Google image search) and so I am hopeful for this new
  system.
 
jasonkostempski - 6 hours ago
Someone's been watching Big Bang Theory reruns.
 
blntechie - 6 hours ago
Just adding - AliExpress has had similar feature for more than a
year when I started using it. It doesn?t work really well though.
 
tegansnyder - 6 hours ago
Can anyone recommend a good tutorial or reading on how to setup
content-based (visual) image searching using a CNN to process
images. I'm looking to build a POC of a reverse image search
trained with in-house product data. In the past I've used the
imgSeek but it is dated and not using neural nets.
 
  dahernan - 4 hours ago
  For a POC you could use Tagbox, just a REST API packed as a
  Docker container from https://machinebox.io, here the blog post
  https://blog.machinebox.io/visual-search-by-machine-box-
  eb30...Disclaimer: I did both of them so, I'm a little bias :)
 
482794793792894 - 4 hours ago
Last weekend, my dad needed new printer cartridges and so we went
sifting through the internet for different offerings. By chance, we
got onto a page on the manufacturer's website, which had images of
all their cartridge packs. Among those, we also found an XL version
of what we initially thought to buy.So, there we were, needing
exactly this feature. If I didn't know that it's impossible for
them to have developed this in such a short time, I'd be a little
freaked.Thankfully, though, TinEye served the exact same purpose...
 
dessant - 5 hours ago
I have made a browser extension[1][2] for those looking to perform
reverse image searches with multiple engines at once. It's more
reliable than Chrome's built-in image search, which appears in the
context menu only for  elements, while this extension parses
the clicked area to extract images. Support for shopping sites may
come in the future.[1] https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail
/search-by-image/cn...[2] https://addons.mozilla.org/en-
US/firefox/addon/search_by_ima...
 
addictedcs - 6 hours ago
Interesting how we built a raw prototype about eight months ago
(https://imgur.com/OIaQu7x), but it never took off (at least for
the customer whom we've pitched).  To add to other's comments, the
visual search can be quite useful comparing to terms search
specifically for non-native speakers and people who are not skilled
in fashion terms (i.e., the name of the material, pattern). As for
how accurate it is, this is indeed an existing problem. If you
product set is significant (>10k products), then the visual search
results can be entirely off the target, not surprised Ebay is
dealing with the same problem.
 
  zepolen - 6 hours ago
  I didn't find that surprising since your blue bag results in the
  demo returned a bunch of bags that didn't look at all like the
  original.
 
    addictedcs - 6 hours ago
    The fuzziness was added on purpose in a way to recommend you
    products you may be interested in (not necessarily the exact
    match).
 
martinshen - 5 hours ago
Can someone explain to me why eBay is trading only at 5.5x P/E? I
fully understand that it isn't growing tremendously but with all
its classified assets, I can't help but feel that it should be
trading at a much higher market cap.
 
  quizme2000 - 5 hours ago
  Funny I noticed this also on yesterday's the Show HN stock
  viewer.  Seems like ebay is ready to be bought or acquired with a
  stock transfer and cash deal.  I would think Walmart would be in
  a damn good position to pull this off even though I'm no fan of
  walmart in general.
 
  jk2323 - 1 hours ago
  Interesting point. But p/e so long, and they are never paying
  dividends, what is happening with that money?I don't think of
  ebay highly, desides what they did to Craigslist.They had Skype.
  They could have been Facebook, but no. They had Paypal. With
  Skype and paypal they could have easily made micropayments on
  cell phones, but no. I hardly ever see a company with so many
  wasted chances. They are in a "winner takes it all" niche but
  sooner or later someone (Open Bazaar?) will challenge them and I
  don't see any innovation from this company.
 
dsfyu404ed - 6 hours ago
Seems like a great way for eBay to undercut brick and mortar stores
(and for consumers to save money) on cheap junk from China that
people would rather pay $0.99 and wait 3wk for than pay $4.99 and
have right now.
 
  icebraining - 2 hours ago
  Also dropshippers who resell such Chinese products under
  different names for a margin.
 
conceptoriented - 5 hours ago
To test a machine learning algorithm, one can use "Fashion-MNIST":
https://github.com/zalandoresearch/fashion-mnist"Fashion-MNIST is a
dataset of Zalando's article images?consisting of a training set of
60,000 examples and a test set of 10,000 examples. Each example is
a 28x28 grayscale image, associated with a label from 10 classes.
We intend Fashion-MNIST to serve as a direct drop-in replacement
for the original MNIST dataset for benchmarking machine learning
algorithms. It shares the same image size and structure of training
and testing splits."
 
CamelCaseName - 7 hours ago
I have been trying to use Amazon's visual search for the past week
or two and out of many trials, it has only worked once.I wonder
whether eBay will beat Amazon in this category as the types of
photos they have access to (amateur/home vs. professional/stock)
are very different. Either way, I am not confident that taking a
picture is a better solution than just typing in the name for the
vast majority of items.
 
  thess24 - 2 hours ago
  Yes, the types of photos will have a huge impact.  eBay most
  definitely has an advantage in that regard.
 
  dsfyu404ed - 6 hours ago
  >Either way, I am not confident that taking a picture is a better
  solution than just typing in the name for the vast majority of
  items.It's a great solution for "I want another one like this one
  but searching for it returns 10000 different items"
 
    CamelCaseName - 5 hours ago
    That seems like a rare case to me. Typically there's a company
    name or model number somewhere on the item, and often that
    identifier returns a very specific item.Looking around my
    house, I only see a few items that don't have unique
    identifiers like furniture or plates/utensils. However, I
    suspect the majority of things sold through Amazon/eBay are
    more likely to be video games, books, toys, etc. with very
    visible and highly unique names.
 
      tom_pinckney - 5 hours ago
      Consider fashion or home goods. Frequently you see something
      you like based on pattern, texture etc that cannot be easily
      described in words. Image search is the perfect fit for these
      kinds of purchases.
 
  gdulli - 2 hours ago
  > I am not confident that taking a picture is a better solution
  than just typing in the name for the vast majority of itemsI call
  this the Minority Report effect. When an idea seems cool but in
  practice is much less usable and practical. And tries to solve a
  problem that never existed. Do I want to wave my hands in the air
  to control an interface or rest them on a table? Obviously the
  latter. It's worked very well for decades.
 
introvert - 5 hours ago
Surprisingly, it works well. I tried searching for few items and it
showed similar items on ebay..
 
ecommerceguy - 39 minutes ago
I wonder if I snap a fake rolex it will find an actual fake rolex.
 
lolsal - 7 hours ago
It seems like ebay would have a ton of user-provided photos which
would be a possibly huge corpus for machine learning to help
identify objects like this. It will be interesting to see how well
this works!
 
  bflesch - 6 hours ago
  The yellow sofa example in the article looked very convincing.
 
syntaxing - 5 hours ago
I know a bunch of sites has this feature already but I'm pretty
excited to try it out since eBay is probably the website with the
best dataset. I do not think any other site has as many home taken
pictures as eBay. This would definitely make the image recognition
much more robust. I'm guessing the problem with Amazon or TaoBao is
that most of the pictures are studio pictures and does not scale
well when a person takes a picture in a random environment.That
being said though, the eBay buying and selling experience is a hit
or miss. It sucks how there is group of people preying on the site
to rip people off. I had an selling experience so bad that I
vouched never to sell anything via eBay anymore. Craiglist tends to
be a much better transaction.
 
pkamb - 3 hours ago
I thought the title said "let you STOP using photos (when
selling)", which is what has basically already happened due to the
prevalence of stock images and CGI items on a white background.I'm
still looking for the browser extension that lets you filter out
any listing with a pure white or gradient background from your
eBay, etsy, pinterest, etc. searches.Would be a HUGE indicator of
an actual real used item sold by a human, vs. a new dropshipped
item from China. You know, what I want to use eBay to buy.
 
incan1275 - 3 hours ago
Happen to know that is the work of the eBay team in New York.
Really great engineers in that lab.
 
eurticket - 3 hours ago
Pintrest should've hit this first.
 
  thess24 - 2 hours ago
  Pinterest does have something similar and has a few blog posts
  about how they did it
 
ll931110 - 6 hours ago
Shameless plug for my friend's startup, which has prototyped the
concept and got a few customers for the last
year.https://www.mirrorthatlook.com/
 
contingencies - 6 hours ago
I'm pretty sure Taobao in China has had this for ages. Search
suggests[0] since as early as 2011. To test it, go to Taobao[1] and
click the photo icon at the right of the search box (previously
only available in some countries and product categories, now
apparently global). If this was the other way around it would be
"OMG China is copying the west!" No such discussion the other way
around. Just sayin'...[0] https://www.chinainternetwatch.com/1189
/taobao-imagine-an-im...[1] http://www.taobao.com/
 
  leggomylibro - 6 hours ago
  Sort of; they also have links to visually-similar items if you
  hover over a listing, if there are the 'right' amount of matching
  products.I mean, how many relevant listings are you going to find
  for a stock photo of a 7x7mm QFP32 chip? Still, that's a risky
  thing to buy on taobao anyways, and it is useful for things like
  specifically-shaped buttons, connectors, etc.
 
    [deleted]
 
  cisanti - 4 hours ago
  Also aliexpress, but it is possible that taobao was first.
 
averageweather - 6 hours ago
Some brilliant mind who lurks on HN should create a competitor to
eBay.  Not some online yard sale where you have to meet people in
person for the exchange, but a nice online marketplace for people
to sell their stuff.If this already exists, do tell.In my opinion,
eBay for sellers (outside of maybe the power sellers.  I've sold
<100 items) is a nightmare.I sold a Tiffany necklace a few months
back.  The buyer reported to eBay it was fake and I was ordered to
refund the seller and they could keep the fake item.  Long story
short, over a span of a few weeks, I was lucky enough to get an
original receipt from Tiffany and supply it as evidence, which
almost still did not work.More recently, I listed an old iPhone
with a "buy it now".  Sold in like 30 minutes to someone with an
"@god[dot].com" email requesting I send the phone first and then he
will pay me.  It took a week or longer for me to challenge this.  I
even have settings to disallow certain types of eBay users based on
ratings etc.  eBay still charged me a listing fee.I had success
doing a non buy it now sale after that.  Maybe that is my only
option now.I don't even feel like getting into how slow their
seller admin tools are ...
 
  nwatson - 6 hours ago
  Google did a similar acquisition in 2010, "like.com".
  https://techcrunch.com/2010/08/20/its-official-google-acquir... .
 
    homero - 5 hours ago
    Might be related to Google goggles app which died
 
  [deleted]
 
  gnopgnip - 4 hours ago
  Ebay doesn't charge a listing fee for the first 50 items per
  month. If the buyer never pays you should open an unpaid item
  claim after three days, then call ebay after four days and have
  the claim closed in your favor. If more sellers did this the
  buyers would get filtered out of ebay. In the future you can use
  buy it now and require immediate payment to prevent this
  entirely. Verifying the authenticity of commonly faked items does
  not have an easy solution and I would not buy or sell anything
  like that on Ebay. Any place that allows the sale of items like
  this will have tradeoffs.Some alternatives to Ebay are Ebid,
  Etsy, Rakuten/buy.com, Amazon, Bonanza(allows cross listing with
  Ebay), Swappa for phones, uBid, Jet.
 
  djaychela - 5 hours ago
  "In my opinion, eBay for sellers (outside of maybe the power
  sellers. I've sold <100 items) is a nightmare."I wouldn't argue
  too strongly with you there.  I've sold loads of stuff on eBay
  (about ?50k worth over the years, apparently!), and there are
  problems too often.  People try it on, so I have to send
  -everything- via recorded mail, which is expensive, so then
  people complain about the postage cost, even though I always put
  them up front.I've had quite a few completely fatuous claims made
  against me when selling, one of which said there were parts
  missing, when I'd actually said those parts were missing in the
  listing.  eBay refunded him and let him keep the item.Whenever I
  have an issue now, I just say 'send it back, I'll refund it' as
  this is invariably the path of lowest friction.  Dealing with
  muppets is a cost of selling on eBay that has to be factored into
  the equation, alas, and it's worse than it ever has been; here in
  the UK around 2000 it was pretty 'niche' and only serious people
  seemed to be on there.  But after a few years (and a few
  newspaper articles along the lines of 'quit your job and make a
  living on eBay') it started getting like it is now.Non paying
  bidders are a pain to sellers, but it means nothing to eBay so
  they don't do anything about it.The upside, at least, is that
  when you buy on there, you're well covered.  Had a dodgy
  'reconditioned' cylinder head turn up a few weeks ago.  Returned
  it without even having to pay postage, which was a relief - in
  the past that would have been ?400 I'd never have seen again.
 
  notyourwork - 3 hours ago
  Years ago I sold an ipod on ebay after Christmas. My parents
  bought me one and a family relative also bought me one.My account
  was suspended for fraud even though I provided proof of purchase
  for the item. I left ebay/paypal and stopped using it when I
  realized that they could arbitrarily hold my money for 6 months
  even though I provided legit proof  they were wrong.
 
  Jemmeh - 3 hours ago
  I have the same problem with Amazon. Both of them favor the buyer
  because customers trusting their platform is a huge selling point
  for them. As a seller most people are honest, but enough of them
  are not for it to be extremely annoying.Problem is you have
  plenty of scammer sellers too.
 
    overcast - 1 hours ago
    Amazon is the worst for a seller, much worse than eBay. It's
    completely in favor of the buyer over there, and can easily be
    gamed. Saying something is damaged, waiting to the absolute
    last second of a 30 day "trial" to return it. It's horrible. I
    will never sell anything on there again.
 
  callmeed - 3 hours ago
  Seems like Facebook would be best positioned to do this. They
  already more transparency than Ebay/Amazon with regards to who
  you're dealing with. They also have regional buy/sell groups
  already. Integrate with some shipping platforms and they'd be on
  their way.That being said, its not really in their lane.
 
  cr0sh - 3 hours ago
  The thing I miss most about ebay are the independent sellers of
  "crap" - not sure how else to put it, but basically the random
  people who dig out stuff from the their "attic" and put it up for
  people to bid over.You know - what Ebay was originally set up
  for.I mean - one time I found a bucket of bolts for auction; just
  a bunch of random rusty bolts someone had in the back of their
  shed, they decided to auction off. And wouldn't you know it, a
  bidding war happened. That bucket of bolts went for close to a
  $100.00 by the time it was all over.Those are the kind of stuff I
  like to see, and the kind of stuff I like to bid on and/or buy.
  Not the mass-produced junk from China - if I want that, I'll get
  it from Amazon or Ali Express (and I do).You can still find this
  on Ebay, but it isn't as ubiquitous like it was in the beginning.
  I personally think their decision to compete with Amazon instead
  of sticking to their core users really changed perceptions and
  user base. Maybe it's better for them, but for users who like
  auctions, finding something similar that is trusted as much
  hasn't been easy (there are a few).
 
  beambot - 5 hours ago
  Lollipuff (YC W'13: https://www.lollipuff.com/) does exactly this
  for higher-end women's fashion -- to directly address the issues
  you had with your Tiffany necklace (though I don't think they
  support Tiffany today).  All the items get authenticated before
  listing by professional authenticators, without needing to take
  items in hand.  This provides more-than-ample evidence in the
  event of a dispute (the authenticators are well known in the
  field!).  Then Lollipuff walks buyers & sellers through the
  process to ensure a safe transaction -- including instructions on
  shipping, which can also be a frequent gotcha for high-end items.
 
    ssharp - 5 hours ago
    I wonder how much eBay has been impacted by this type of
    "wedging". I would use eBay primarily to buy/sell musical
    instruments but Reverb took a pretty big chunk of that market
    and provides a better and more trustworthy experience than
    eBay, at least in my experiences there.I know there are a few
    fashion-related sites like this out there and I'd guess there
    are other "Reverb for X" sites as well.I'm sure there is still
    a fortune in the long-tail but specialty sites seem to be more
    of a concern than a direct competitor.
 
  nik736 - 6 hours ago
  I agree completely, also their platform is just so slow and full
  of bugs. It simply looks like they havn't changed anything in the
  past 10 years.Edit: Forgot to mention that their search is so
  bad, they mix search results with search phrases previously so
  it's impossible to find things I am looking for.
 
  Xeoncross - 6 hours ago
  This is a real hard problem. Bad people make everything bad for
  everyone else. The problem is more about the US market laws and
  scalability I think.Large companies like eBay have to take fraud
  and customer support costs and weight it against their company vs
  you as a seller. It would take a company that cared more about
  sellers than their own bottom line.The customer is always right.
  Middle men like eBay have two customers though: the buyer and the
  seller. They support the one that helps them the most and let the
  other get burned occasionally.Note: I mostly buy "buy-it-now"
  items on ebay
 
  idibidiart - 6 hours ago
  The only purchase I ever done on eBay was in 2002 for a PocketPC.
  It never came. I reported the seller. They said 22 others were
  scammed and PayPal, their partner in crime, said that they
  couldn't reveal the seller's personal detail unless by court
  order. That was the only UX data point I needed. Never used eBay
  again.
 
    jws - 6 hours ago
    What were you planning to do with the seller's personal
    information outside of the legal system?
 
      idibidiart - 1 hours ago
      Naively, alert his bank that he was stealing money from
      everyone and share the PayPal email with them. I wasn't aware
      at the time that I could take the matter to small claims
      court. PayPal offered no assistance as far as laying out what
      my options were. They were fine with it, it seemed. Zero on
      actual customer "care."
 
  gdulli - 2 hours ago
  It's just as bad selling on Amazon. They both disproportionately
  and intentionally side with buyers because the buyers are where
  the money comes from.
 
  chis - 2 hours ago
  I just sell things on reddit. Something about having access to
  the other?s post history keeps things honest.
 
  fny - 2 hours ago
  There are a bajillion eBay alternatives in the wild. Here are a
  few... /smercari.com, swappa.com, letgo.com, offerup.com,
  snapsale.com, wish.com local, varagesale.com, listia.com,
  carousell.com, shpock.com, 5miles.comBelieve it or not, eBay has
  even made their own local selling app close5.com
 
  user5994461 - 5 hours ago
  Ebay is great.There isn't any marketplace without fraud on iPhone
  and jewelry.
 
  searchers - 6 hours ago
  I think blockchain will help us with this.
 
    SamPatt - 5 hours ago
    For the payments layer, yes, but not for storing the actual
    marketplace data. Blockchains aren't great for storing data
    apart from maintaining a transaction ledger.When we started
    building OpenBazaar we specifically avoided using a blockchain
    apart from Bitcoin for payments. It was the right call I think.
    There are plenty of other decentralization tools to use apart
    from blockchains, like IPFS, which OpenBazaar 2.0 is built on
    top of.
 
    untog - 6 hours ago
    It would be interesting to create an HN bot that replies
    exactly this to every top submission, then track the
    up/downvotes
 
      [deleted]
 
  SamPatt - 6 hours ago
  >If this already exists, do tell.Yes, it does exist, and it's
  completely open source. It's called OpenBazaar, and it's a fully
  decentralized marketplace. There's no middlemen at
  all.https://www.openbazaar.org/It's backed by the OB1 company,
  which has raised $4.25 million from a16z, USV, and BlueYard.It
  uses IPFS so that stores don't go offline, and all payments are
  settled in Bitcoin.We love code reviews and pull requests. The
  back end is done in Go:https://github.com/OpenBazaar/openbazaar-
  goThe front end is an Electron app:https://github.com/OpenBazaar
  /openbazaar-desktop
 
    njarboe - 5 hours ago
    OpenBazaar looks like a great project, but with $4.25 million
    in backing from VCs, it does not look like a charity project.
    How do you plan on monetizing your work? It was not clear to me
    from the OpenBazaar or OB1 websites. I only ask because many
    great products work well when VC money is supporting it, but
    then are seriously degraded when the company needs to start
    showing revenue and then a profit.
 
      usrusr - 49 minutes ago
      In an ideal world, maybe from selling consulting to
      commercial sellers? In reality, I see absolutely no overlap
      between the kind of business who would ever consider paying
      for FOSS consulting and the kind of business who would trade
      on a more chaotic version of eBay.But could an IPFS
      distributed system provide reasonable search, e.g. competing
      with eBay's new search-by-image?An open, distributed market
      can be worked by closed, centralized search engines. If they
      design the market they are a prime candidate for becoming the
      dominant search engine layered on top.
 
      SamPatt - 4 hours ago
      I responded to this
      elsewhere:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15561370
 
    Sir_Cmpwn - 5 hours ago
    Being a desktop application is a pretty serious barrier to
    usability for the average person. So is using Bitcoin, to be
    honest.
 
      SamPatt - 4 hours ago
      You're right. We're about to launch a mobile app and working
      on getting it working on browser as well.Bitcoin is a barrier
      but our goal is to eventually be currency agnostic. It does
      enable us to do escrow properly though with 2-of-3 multisig,
      and it also ensures that people control their own money.
 
      mustacheemperor - 1 hours ago
      Bitcoin is an accessibility barrier, but OpenBazaar is also
      an example of the kind of models bitcoin reduces the hurdles
      for.
 
    themihai - 6 hours ago
    How do they manage listing flooding or fraud?
 
      SamPatt - 6 hours ago
      Buyers can place orders one of two ways:1. A direct order.
      The Bitcoin goes directly from buyer to vendor. There are no
      protections. This method is only used for small value
      transactions or transactions where the buyer trusts the
      vendor.2. A moderated order. The Bitcoin goes into an escrow
      account (a 2-of-3 Bitcoin multisig address) and there is a
      third party moderator who will resolve a dispute if one of
      the parties feels wronged.Note that if there is no dispute
      opened in a moderated order, the buyer and the seller can
      release the funds without the moderator even knowing they
      were chosen for an order.There's nothing to prevent listing
      flooding, but the rest of the network will just ignore nodes
      that are abusive. There are also third party search engines
      that crawl the network, and they'll block spam themselves for
      their users. Rawflood is an example:https://rawflood.com
 
        teddyh - 4 hours ago
        How do you select and assign moderators?
 
          SamPatt - 3 hours ago
          Currently the vendor selects a list of moderators they
          are comfortable working with, and then at the time of a
          sale the buyer selects the one they prefer. If a dispute
          is opened the moderator the buyer picked from the
          vendor's list will resolve the dispute.
 
          teddyh - 3 hours ago
          That does not sound safe for the buyer at all; they?re
          forced to choose a moderator from a list completely
          decided by the vendor?
 
          SamPatt - 3 hours ago
          In practice most vendors choose from the top moderators
          on the platform who all have good reputations, so it's
          not as dangerous as it sounds.If a vendor only offers
          unknown moderators a buyer just won't buy from them, or
          will ask them to add a moderator they trust.
 
          smogcutter - 46 minutes ago
          What's in it for the moderator? I assume they get a cut
          of the escrow?How is the moderator's reputation visible
          to a buyer? If there's some kind of rating system, why
          would the reviews be useful at all? After all, any
          situation where the moderator has to act will leave one
          party pissed off.This seems like a lot of complication
          just to buy something on the internet... unless what
          you're buying is heroin. In which case the whole 100% p2p
          thing starts making more sense.
 
    sharemywin - 5 hours ago
    I never understood how this works. How does  a16z, USV, and
    BlueYard make their money back?  That's why I've been hesitant
    to deal with this stuff because I don't understand the business
    model.
 
      SamPatt - 5 hours ago
      They didn't invest in OpenBazaar, they invested in OB1, the
      company who is leading development on OpenBazaar. I'm a co-
      founder of OB1 and we monetize by offering services to users
      on the platform, not by monetizing the platform directly (no
      fees).
 
        sharemywin - 4 hours ago
        If you don't mind me asking:How do things like privacy
        policies, terms of service, contracts between parties work?
 
          SamPatt - 3 hours ago
          The contracts between users are all cryptographically
          signed in a system called Ricardian Contracts. At any
          point each party has a digitally signed copy of all the
          information they need to proceed with the trade.Because
          this is a protocol for decentralized trade, and a network
          to engage in trade, there's really no terms of service or
          privacy policies that can be enforced between users. They
          connect to each other completely P2P, the devs or anyone
          else can't enforce anything between them (and don't even
          know a transaction is happening).
 
          majormajor - 49 minutes ago
          Is this a sorta "we had no idea so much of our revenue
          was derived from pirated content" play sorta like
          Youtube, then, but for an active marketplace that's
          actually maybe just filled with fraud?No awareness by the
          company and no easy ability to enforce terms before users
          make me wonder why the heck I'd ever want to try to sell
          or buy something on that platform. Seems like craigslist
          but with too high a bar of entry for the good-intentioned
          non-fraudster non-tech-savvy users.
 
    zokier - 4 hours ago
    OP has relatively specific bad experiences with ebay. How does
    OB exactly prevent similar cases? Being decentralized and based
    on bitcoin does not help against fraudulent buyers or buyers
    wasting time by attempting to negotiate unreasonable terms.
 
    tomaskafka - 4 hours ago
    So you can sell your goods to all three people on Earth
    interested in both ipfs and btc?
 
      SamPatt - 4 hours ago
      They are built on top of those technologies, but the user
      isn't exposed to any of the technical complexities.
      Seriously, go to openbazaar.org and download it, see for
      yourself.
 
    jes5199 - 5 hours ago
    None of the problems with Ebay are the software.
 
  schnevets - 4 hours ago
  I had a summer of eBay nightmares in college. I was supposed to
  help a relative sell an attic full of old clothes and knick
  knacks. Nothing was buying because I was a new seller, so I put
  some old video games on to bolster my score with quick sales.
  Everything went well until one person reported me for not
  including the box & manual (which was never mentioned in the
  listing) while another claimed the disc was counterfeit. After
  these two headaches, my relative complained about having to give
  some costume jewelry up for $7. At that point I decided it wasn't
  worth the trouble. Final profit was $97There are definitely ways
  to improve the process. Maybe a "middleman" has to provide an
  appraisal or validation for the jewelry/electronic before making
  the listing. The true obstacle with any new competitor is network
  effect. When normal people want to sell local, they use
  Craigslist, when they want to sell nationally, they use eBay. Any
  chaff has already been taken by the big guys, and what is left
  isn't worth the fight.
 
  kermittd - 3 hours ago
  I've actually thought about that idea and even did some initial
  prototyping for a mobile app. But the idea I had was a more
  usable/less scammy version of craigslist specifically for local
  commerce. Initially, I was thinking of limiting the goods to
  electronics and then expanding slowly to other items.
 
zokier - 4 hours ago
It would be interesting if they'd use this tech to deduplicate the
gazillion listings for many cheap (chinese) goods which seem to use
common set of images with maybe varying watermarks etc.
 
adityapatadia - 2 hours ago
We provide similar technology as a service if anyone is interested
to hire us. Check our demo at:
https://app.turingiq.com/demo/image/client
 
Kiro - 6 hours ago
How can I use this from desktop?