GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-22) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
In Estonia virtually every process is digitized
83 points by breck
http://fortune.com/2017/04/27/estonia-digital-life-tech-startups/
tartups/
___________________________________________________________________
 
benevol - 41 minutes ago
The flip side of this movement is of course even better profiling
and mass surveillance.
 
[deleted]
 
Animats - 1 hours ago
The Starship delivery robot is real, but it's not really
operational.  One can be seen in downtown Redwood City, wandering
around with a keeper following it.  It's been doing that for six
months. They have a few in Estonia, a few in San Francisco, and a
few in London. All demos.Starship reminds me of Better Place, the
car battery swap company out of Israel. Too much PR, too many demos
spread around the world, not enough profitable deployment.  It
looks like they're trying to make enough noise to be acquired by
Amazon and exit, rather than actually providing a service that gets
used.
 
  emerongi - 32 minutes ago
  There is a drone delivery system that is being developed right
  now. The plan is to install towers into buildings, where the
  drones can land and drop off the deliveries. You could
  potentially do your shopping at work, and then pick up your
  deliveries at the door once you come home (or have them delivered
  at your workplace). I'm much more excited for this than the
  robot.
 
    DrScump - 5 minutes ago
    In many areas, it won't stay at the door intact by the time you
    get home.
 
silversmith - 2 hours ago
The article positions the Estonian ID number as something magical
and superior to SSN. In reality, out of the 11 symbols, 6 are
governed by your date of birth and another one denotes the gender,
and out of the remaining four one is a checksum digit.The only way
the Estonian system is better is that the law dictates this number
not to be treated as sensitive or identifying information, so you
can't get a loan on your neighbours name just because you caught a
glimpse of his passport.
 
  perfmode - 1 hours ago
  > The only way the Estonian system is better is that the law
  dictates this number not to be treated as sensitive or
  identifying informationThat's precisely the issue with SSN.
 
  samstave - 2 hours ago
  Sure, but isn't it interesting that freaking ESTONIA has been a
  forefront thinking country when it comes to tech-as-right
  country?FFS - I live and only have ever worked in Silicon Valley
  and I couldn't even get freaking DSL for five years after it was
  invented in San Jose!
 
    romanovcode - 2 hours ago
    No, it's not. Baltics got their independence in 1991 and they
    had to re-build a lot of infrastructure rendering it more
    modern.
 
      omginternets - 1 hours ago
      Non sequitur.  It does not follow from your argument that
      there is nothing to be learned from the Estonian model.If
      nothing else, it's a shining example of what can be achieved
      when a collective effort is put into modernizing digital
      infrastructure, i.e. putting a little -- otherwise
      [economically] unremarkable -- baltic country on the economic
      map.  Moreover, this comes at a time during which there is
      much discussion of the US (and several European countries')
      aging infrastructures, and in which the economic opportunity
      of modernizing them is being scrutinized.Granted, this kind
      of transformation may or may not be possible elsewhere, but
      to brush it aside as "uninteresting" is to suggest a lack of
      intellectual curiosity.
 
      mamon - 1 hours ago
      Also, it helps that it's a tiny country (1.3 million
      citizens), so providing IT infrastructure is dirt cheap.
 
        Retric - 1 hours ago
        It's the other way around. Remember, countries pay for R&D
        independent of the number of people in it, but they only
        get taxes relative to their population.  So smaller
        countries need to spend a higher % of GDP on IT or deal
        with worse systems.What's going on is larger counties made
        the jump sooner so small countries have many examples to
        learn from.
 
        hellofunk - 1 hours ago
        A country's size cannot be overstated. I don't know about
        cost, but for mere agility, the smaller a country is, the
        more nimble it can be for all sorts of reform and
        progressive progress. Singapore and the Netherlands are
        both small countries that have managed to overhaul aspects
        of society without much barrier in years past. Germany is a
        big place, the U.S. much bigger. Estonia, tiny. You can do
        all sorts of things when you have just a few people it will
        affect.
 
        icebraining - 44 minutes ago
        Fewer citizens also means smaller budget, how does that
        help?
 
    aaron-lebo - 1 hours ago
    Several of the Nordic/Baltic countries are like that. Why does
    Russia not follow that pattern? What's different about it
    culturally?
 
      aquadrop - 1 hours ago
      Russia is kinda actually like that. Tech usage is relatively
      good in Russia. Internet is cheap and fast, mobile coverage
      is good and mobile internet is relatively cheap, internet
      banking & mobile banking is better than most of Europe and
      USA. There's also such thing as "Gosuslugi" which is country-
      wide services internet portal and is actually pretty
      convenient innovation.
 
        baybal2 - 56 minutes ago
        >Russia is kinda actually like that. Tech usage is
        relatively good in Russia. Internet is cheap and fast,
        mobile coverage is good and mobile internet is relatively
        cheap, internet banking & mobile banking is better than
        most of Europe and USA. There's also such thing as
        "Gosuslugi" which is country-wide services internet portal
        and is actually pretty convenient innovation.Yet, but the
        prime majority of all that wonderful digital cornucopia is
        being developed by underfed and underpaid devs with level
        of technical comprehension comparable to people called
        "jquery monkeys" in the West. By the time most of them
        reach late twenties, more experienced ones will move on to
        become professional devs abroad, another will, sadly, join
        the socioeconomic construct/caste of "going to nowhere 30
        somethings." You guys in the West complain about age
        discrimination and skill obsolescence only by the time you
        hit forties, fifties, if not sixties, but here people hit
        the same stage much earlier. Companies do not pay for skill
        even 1/10th of what an American Dotcom would.What makes a
        seeming difference in the level of quality is that
        experienced tech people are found more evenly distributed
        than in US where Dotcoms and well funded companies vacuum
        significant portion of any much senior developers on the
        job market, or in China where Alibaba and Tencent literally
        employ double digit of all tech workforce and almost all
        real talent. Here, the fact that a software developer is
        just yet another "nothing special" white collar occupation
        somehow, counterintuitively brings some benefit.
 
          thriftwy - 32 minutes ago
          If you tried to make a point you kind of failed.I make
          $40k after tax, in Russia, employed locally, and while
          that doesn't sound like much to an American ear, I've
          bought my apartment for $90k a year before. I seriously
          doubt anyone is going to pay me $400k before tax in the
          US as you suggested. I'm 32 by the way. And I never work
          more than 40 hr/week.I don't see how you can underpay a
          dev in Russia. Maybe you can by hiring in really small
          and depressive towns? Or promising rocket science job?
 
          baybal2 - 22 minutes ago
          >I make $40k after tax, in RussiaThat makes you a rather
          expensive employee if the company hiring you actually
          pays your pension contributions, EI, medical bills, and
          other quasi-tax charges (which are much higher than in
          the West.)24k a year is what a good grad can expect in a
          company that pays taxes in full. The full cost of
          employing such a guy will be right about $40k
 
      aj-4 - 1 hours ago
      Estonia and its people are culturally the most similar to
      Finland - in fact none of the baltic countries are slavic -
      and all speak exceptional English (better than Western
      Europe). They are very pro-EU countries whom have benefitted
      greatly economically and 'defensively' (vs Russia, at least
      in terms of peace of mind). What will continue to limit
      Russia are its authoritarian attitudes towards information
      and trade.
 
        xxs - 4 minutes ago
        The part about English spoken in the Baltic is vastly
        untrue -- outside (center of) Tartu and Tallinn [the 2
        biggest cities] English is not that well spoken when it
        comes to Estonia. Latvia is similar - mostly Riga (even
        though Russian is more profoundly spoken). Most of the
        younger generation could have an ok English but nothing
        remarkable, even doctors may not have good English. I don't
        have good enough impressions of Lithuania, although it's
        not uncommon to fall back to Russian in
        restaurants.Compared to Denmark or Norway where virtually
        everyone (from kids to elderly people) actually speak
        decent English, none of the Baltic countries have
        'exceptional English'.
 
      elefanten - 1 hours ago
      There's probably something to being a lot bigger and having
      more diverse population density.But ultimately the biggest
      culprit is probably the major political, economic and
      cultural hangovers from over a century of political
      instability.
 
      fsloth - 12 minutes ago
      Culturally? Finland, Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia are
      culturally distinct from Russia, i.e. non-slavic. E.g. they
      all have their own archaic languages and so on.One can look
      at the populations in circa 1300 and extrapolate from that.
      Without going into details - the baltic coast had it's own
      catholic/pagan populations with trade ties to hanseatic
      cities, and those populations are the basis for current
      nation states.Russia, with it's slavic culture strongly tied
      to the greek orthodox church was a bit further to east.See
      for examplehttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_change
      s_of_Russi...and other wikipedia pages on the baltic
      states.None of this have much to do with the current tech
      scene, though :)
 
unitboolean - 1 hours ago
Meanwhile, Germany is moving in the opposite direction. Taxes are
increasing and now Germany is the second highest taxed country in
the world (according to OECD). and freelancers here can't even work
without a tax advisers who will manage all their taxes, because the
system is so complicated. Mobile internet is extremely expensive.
Just one day of using mobile internet in Germany will cost you more
than a a whole month mobile internet in Ukraine... everything is
very bureaucratic and a lot of paper work is required on every
corner. and don't forget, there are more than 300000 laws and rules
for everything. I can keep this list forever, but after all, I
think I should just move to Estonia, because Germany is definitely
not for me.
 
  gumby - 55 minutes ago
  > and freelancers here can't even work without a tax advisers who
  will manage all their taxes, because the system is so
  complicated.Basically everybody with more than a minimum wage job
  in the US needs this kind of help, and regulatory (actually
  congressional) capture by the two giants Intuit and H&R Block
  mean that any efforts to fix this are squelched.
 
  aj-4 - 55 minutes ago
  People forget that Germany was still reverberating from its own
  bounce-back for many years. Now it's bogged down by immigration
  and currency woes.As for Estonia.. here's a golden ticket to make
  international internet income + low cost of living. Not to
  mention Talinn is charming.
 
  tluyben2 - 1 hours ago
  Sounds a lot like Spain, rules and paperwork. Taxes are lower but
  so crappy that even with an accountant you often pay the weirdest
  things and cannot declare many of the legitimate expenses you
  might have so in the end I pay as much as I did in NL.The Estonia
  e-residency is very good for ?nomads? ; if you travel a lot (say
  you do not reside in one country 6 months + 1 days and (but this
  is debatable somehow) are not in a country more than 60 days
  continues, you can have a company in Estonia and declare tax for
  that company there. Which is to say, no tax until you take money
  out. If you don?t travel like that it is far more complex.
 
    iagovar - 36 minutes ago
    Spain is not nearly as complicated for a freelance. The problem
    in Spain is that the administration is a disaster in the
    "customer care" level. Also, every time a new technology
    appears they have to open a process for companies to bid
    (basically because their own IT dept is totally overloaded and
    I highly doubt they are keeping up with technologies) and do
    whatever is needed, but it's at least one year cycle.They try
    to make everything anti-cheat, but in the end cheaters cheat
    anyway, and in the process they make everything slow and
    painful.
 
  tormeh - 1 hours ago
  It's not moving in the other direction. In fact there's a clear
  political consensus among the parties (probably) making up the
  next government that "digitization" should be one of the main
  foci of attention going forward. Particularly the liberal parties
  of course (Greens, FDP), but the CDU seem to also fancy this
  newfangled internet-thingy. Fifteen years late, but moving in the
  right direction.I have the feeling this is generally true in the
  other conservative parts of the EU as well. Eyes are very much on
  Estonia in the EU for this reason. It's all very sluggish, but
  the wheels are starting to turn, I think.
 
  adwhit - 1 hours ago
  And yet.. Germany has probably the most successful economy in the
  world. I guess being friendly to startups and freelancers just
  ain't that important?
 
    aaron-lebo - 1 hours ago
    What metric are you using to measure successful?
 
      adwhit - 1 hours ago
      High productivity, huge trade surplus, low unemployment, very
      high standard of living
 
    tormeh - 1 hours ago
    >Germany has probably the most successful economy in the
    worldNope. Not even in the EU. Not even close. Where does this
    myth come from? Is it that it has passed the UK per capita?I
    mean, there are loads of nice things about Germany, and
    economic strength is one, but that's a wild exaggeration.
 
      orf - 41 minutes ago
      Well, it's the biggest capital exporter in the world (huge
      surplus) and is the third largest exporter in total. It's
      also got the highest GDP in the EU by a fair margin.Per-
      capita in the EU is skewed by a fair number of very small but
      very very rich countries. Luxembourg, the leader, being a tax
      haven and a population of half a million (!!) does not make
      it the healthiest and best economy.
 
        tormeh - 21 minutes ago
        Total GDP is irrelevant to everything. People use it like
        it means something, and it's just annoying.
 
          orf - 11 minutes ago
          Ok, that's quite convenient. What metric would you use?
          Because Germany has a higher GDP per capita than the UK
          or France. It would be a hard point to argue that any
          other country in the EU has a stronger economy than those
          three.
 
    [deleted]
 
  [deleted]
 
  KGIII - 12 minutes ago
  I can't find any OECD data that says Germany is the second
  highest taxed country in the world. The closest I can find is the
  tax as a percentage of GDP and, in that listing, they are
  13th.I'm interested in reading more/a list of the highest taxed
  nations as a way to easily counter the claim that the US is the
  highest taxed. Do you have a link/citation, so that I can verify
  that?
 
  k__ - 58 minutes ago
  I'm a freelancer in Germany and I only have to pay two kind of
  taxes, income tax and turnover tax.