GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-22) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
A newly discovered moon tunnel
198 points by hilendugo
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/...
___________________________________________________________________
 
kseverest - 3 hours ago
I wonder how stable such tubes would be? No water erosion, no
earthquakes, even though they must have formed at a time that was
more geologically active. They could be on the edge of collapse if
say, a large vehicle drove in them. Am I wrong?Just a first
thought. Other than that, they could probably serve as a goal for
human spaceflight, an intermediate step between walking on the moon
and colonizing mars.
 
  galaxyLogic - 3 hours ago
  > no earthquakes No but how about moon-quakes? Ok, not
  geologically active you say. But moon's been bombarded by
  asteroids it's surface is full of craters. Creating a crater
  wouldn't that be an equivalent of a moon-quake?
 
    kseverest - 3 hours ago
    You are absolutely correct.
 
    nkoren - 2 hours ago
    This is the correct answer. These lava tubes are, at their
    youngest, a couple billion years old. Since then, the moon has
    been thwacked very hard and -- on those timescales -- often. If
    the tubes haven't collapsed yet, then there's a high likelihood
    that they're exceptionally stable.
 
      DougWebb - 1 hours ago
      That could be survivor bias. Maybe there used to be a lot
      more of them.
 
        robryk - 1 hours ago
        Wouldn't a collapsed tube be very distinctive visually?
 
          nkoren - 1 hours ago
          Very much so -- and one has even been explored by humans!
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadley%E2%80%93Apennine
 
        njarboe - 1 hours ago
        Yes survivor bias. But since these survived, they are
        likely to be structurally sound. Like antique furniture or
        structures on Earth.
 
        larkeith - 1 hours ago
        Does that count as natural selection?
 
          pstuart - 43 minutes ago
          I don't think lava tubes breed.
 
    knappe - 1 hours ago
    You're not accounting for tidal forces.  The same forces that
    create the tides on Earth also affect the moon.  In this case
    via moon-quakes.https://phys.org/news/2017-08-moon-tidal-
    stress-responsible-...
 
  ballenf - 3 hours ago
  The article mentions the use of inflatable housing inside. Seems
  like a wise move given we have so little experience with their
  stability.If they've survived this long, then presumably they are
  very unlikely to collapse on their own. That is, settlers would
  only need to worry about collapse cause by their own
  movements.The odds of them being 'on the verge of collapse' are
  relatively low in my thinking. Unless there is some process that
  takes them to the edge and then stops that we don't understand.
  Otherwise, they are likely to have either already collapsed or be
  somewhat stable.
 
    QAPereo - 1 hours ago
    The moon is pretty dead, so no processes exist... if they?re
    stable, barring asteroid strike. They?d remain stable. The
    problem is metastability, the ?death block? problem in ice
    climbing.
 
      millettjon - 50 minutes ago
      There are moonquakes so not completely dead.
      https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/home/15mar_moonquakes.html
 
  nnfy - 2 hours ago
  I'd imagine the tubes are relatively stable because they
  regularly (at geologic time scales) experience seismic
  disturbances from weak plate tectonic activity and especially
  impact events.
 
saagarjha - 3 hours ago
> And many scientists have long dreamed of building bases inside
natural moon caves, where lunar explorers might sleep safely in
inflatable homes, protected from the storms above.What "storms" are
the authors talking about here?
 
  jjoonathan - 3 hours ago
  Solar flares?
 
  FreeFull - 3 hours ago
  Maybe solar storms? The Sun sends out quite a lot of radiation
  from time to time. Earth is protected by its magnetic field and
  atmosphere, the Moon and Mars not so much.
 
    yeukhon - 21 minutes ago
    Am I incorrect without an active lava core, the magnetic field
    is basically non-existient? Then Moon tunnel is probably not
    good enough for humans to remain healthy.
 
  ColanR - 3 hours ago
  Solar storms, where the danger is solar radiation...same thing
  we're concerned might cause health risks en route to Mars.
 
  IncRnd - 2 hours ago
  The reference to the caves protecting from storms is to the
  preceding sentence in the paragraph that mentions lunar tunnels
  giving protection from meteors and radiation.
 
  [deleted]
 
  bane - 3 hours ago
  Solar storms.
 
gamebak - 1 hours ago
Why do you always post from a source which requires you to pay
upfront to read the article?
 
sideshowb - 2 hours ago
"Let's dig a tunnel to the centre of the moon!" "You can't dig a
tunnel to the centre of the moon, Blode!" "Yes I can! It will be a
special tunnel, and it will go to the centre of the moon!"Anyone
else remember that?
 
  cyberferret - 2 hours ago
  I don't recall that quip, but I do recall an episode of "Space
  1999" decades ago titled "The Catacombs of the Moon" where they
  discover a vast underground cave system, (which turns out to be
  the hibernation place for a civilisation of aliens, IIRC)...  The
  episode always had me intrigued as to whether the moon actually
  could have a large cave system that could be hermetically sealed
  and inhabited by humans to save on shipping tons of building
  materials out there.
 
  Nition - 1 hours ago
  The Internet in its infinite wisdom tells me this is from "Tales
  of the Blode Episode 2: A Trip to the Seaside."
 
aluhut - 1 hours ago
Hope they don't find a labyrinth in there.
 
kharms - 3 hours ago
When such discoveries are made who "owns" that real estate?
 
  ballenf - 3 hours ago
  Are there any figures on the minimum $/gram of minerals that
  would justify a mining mission (presumably unmanned)? Just can't
  imagine that gold, platinum or any stable metal would be worth
  it. Maybe high grade diamonds that don't need to be extracted
  from other rock. The surveys would have likely identified the
  presence of such a high density substance and we haven't seen any
  mention of it.I know you probably meant in terms rights to the
  "best" cave on the moon, but I'm just wondering what happens if
  the cave turns out to filled with frozen water, for example, that
  would be worth its weight in antimatter (not quite) on the moon.
 
    DougWebb - 1 hours ago
    The most common elements on the moon are quite common on the
    earth too; I don't think the value in mining them will ever
    come from bringing the mined materials back to earth. The value
    is going to come from having and maintaining an established
    base on the moon. The moon is a high point in the earth's
    gravity well that's full of raw materials that can be used to
    build things that can go further out. Mining on the moon is
    going to be about building and supplying interplanetary (and
    maybe interstellar) spaceships, not selling jewelry back on
    earth.[0]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geology_of_the_Moon#Elemental_...
 
      yeukhon - 19 minutes ago
      Though a jewelry made from Moon elements would probably have
      a ten-fold price tag than the Earth?s counterpart, because
      it?s from the Moon.
 
        DougWebb - 4 minutes ago
        Maybe at first, but not once they're mass-produced on the
        kind of scale that would be needed to justify the cost of
        moon-based mining.
 
  jccooper - 3 hours ago
  Whomever can occupy it. Outer Space Treaty prohibits national
  claims but not use for peaceful purposes. So if you sit on it,
  you own it.
 
    galaxyLogic - 3 hours ago
    If you break it, you own it
 
    r00fus - 3 hours ago
    According to link above the treaty prohibits all sovereign
    claims.However, getting there can be made into a reasonable
    barrier to competition.  Sure you can also exploit the moon,
    but how are you going to get there?
 
  dangpzanco - 3 hours ago
  "Who Owns the Moon? | Space Law & Outer Space Treaties" -
  https://www.space.com/33440-space-law.html
 
    BurningFrog - 3 hours ago
    We'll see how much those words on papers mean when real value
    is to be had up there.
 
    samstave - 3 hours ago
    I'm only familiar with Bird Law, and as there are no birds on
    the moon, I am sure that "rock law" will predominate in that if
    I hit you over the head with a big enough rock, I then
    obviously own the moon.
 
  cabaalis - 3 hours ago
  Whoever wins the inevitable conflict if anything of value is
  found.
 
moomin - 3 hours ago
Sounds like we need to send a probe or ten to the Moon. Who knows
what?s down there? (Although the answer is going to be ?some rocks?
as far as most non-astronomers are concerned.)
 
  rbanffy - 37 minutes ago
  Probably ice. Ice that falls into the entrance and then
  sublimates has a good chance of moving to perpetual darkness
  regions and to stay there. Factor a couple billion years and you
  probably will have a decent amount.Now imagine there is some
  simple biology happening from the time the Moon had some
  atmosphere, in caves sealed billions of years ago.
 
  marksellers - 3 hours ago
  Really cool rocks, though.
 
    [deleted]
 
  shusson - 11 minutes ago
  I would love to know the rough cost to send a probe to the moon.
 
dandr01d - 1 hours ago
Yes
 
Density - 3 hours ago
TLDR:Space nerds theorized moon caves since the 80s.  Moon caves
created by young moon lava flows billions of years ago found in
early 2000s. Japanese space agency finished mapping a tunnel last
week and found it's 50km long and 500m wide with a flat bottom
perfect for building space buildings in.This is news that's
breaking to a revitalized moon rocket industry with all agencies
and players building their own big moon rocket. New Glenn for blue
origins, bfr for spacex, sls for NASA, ACES for ULA (boeing
aerospace + lockmart ) Chinese have also expressed interest in a
moon base.
 
  danielbln - 2 hours ago
  So, uh, who owns the moon, and that tunnel in particular? Is it
  first come first serve?
 
    _puk - 2 hours ago
    Dennis hope [0]I do recall buying an acre as a fun present back
    in the day..0: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2654045
    /Id-buy-moon-...1st google hit, but seems fittingly trash..
 
      kobeya - 2 hours ago
      You were swindled.
 
    kobeya - 2 hours ago
    No one does according to the Outer Space Treaty. No one can
    according to the Moon Treaty. (Thankfully the major powers
    didn?t ratify that one.) In practice, common law has ruled that
    physical possession constitutes ownership with the precedent of
    the Apollo artifacts and Lunakhod rover.
 
    pavement - 2 hours ago
    Whoever gets there first, and can realistically form a threat
    credible enough to defend it.You?ll probably need the backing
    of a nuclear power, although off-world representation of
    earthly countries might not turn out to be particularly
    credible threats (enough to intimidate new emerging space-based
    powers), or remain truly politically cohesive with their root
    terrestrial counterparts, depending...
 
      Density - 2 hours ago
      I have the sinking feeling we'll be teaching space
      marksmanship to our next batch of astronauts.
 
        II2II - 1 hours ago
        If it came to blows, chances are that the battles would be
        fought on Earth.  Launching anything is expensive.
        Launching anything manned is prohibitively expensive.
        Armaments would just increase the cost and the risk.
 
      jdiaz5513 - 2 hours ago
      Or maybe the people who get there can just agree to cooperate
      instead and share the land, unlike how we do things down
      here.One can dream.
 
      golemotron - 2 hours ago
      That checks out. There is a treaty but space-faring nations
      have not signed it.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_Treaty
 
    lostlogin - 2 hours ago
    ?Possession is 9/10th of the law? would appear especial
    relevant on the moon. However the United Nations Outer Space
    Treaty agreed that no one can claim sovereignty.
    https://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2014/02/lunar-proper...
 
  cgb223 - 2 hours ago
  Is there any advantage for a country to have a base on the moon?
 
    Razengan - 6 minutes ago
    Even without exploitable resources, space observation
    (telescopes) and communications systems on the Moon would have
    to contend with less interference from terrestrial noise, I?d
    guess. Having a foothold on the Moon would definitely assist
    further space exploration.Getaways to the moon would also
    become a great new tourism industry for the ultra-rich and
    wealthy, whose money would in turn spur advancements in off-
    world habitation and comfort that could trickle down to the
    general populace.I also think all human political leadership
    should be relocated to the Moon, at least for a week or two
    every year, to help them appreciate Earth a little better
    [0].[0] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overview_effect
 
    space_fountain - 2 hours ago
    If you ever want to do a lot in space a ton
 
      space_fountain - 2 hours ago
      Sorry meant to expand more. The fact that the moon has such
      lower gravity than the earth means it's a lot cheaper in
      theory to get stuff from the surface of the moon to orbit
      than from earth
 
        cgb223 - 2 hours ago
        How much energy does it take to get stuff from the earth to
        the moon though?Is it that much less than leaving earths
        gravity all together?
 
        lostlogin - 2 hours ago
        But there isn?t exactly a lot of readily available
        resources on the moon, so until that changes your just
        paying to lift stuff twice. Water may be an exception to
        this?
 
          sdenton4 - 2 hours ago
          You can use electricity to split water into hydrogen and
          oxygen, aka, fuel. Finding an underground ice lake would
          provide lots of fuel, and save on lifting the heaviest,
          most important substance for manned exploration from
          earth.
 
          vorticalbox - 2 hours ago
          Water takes a lot of energy to split. Take a small size
          as a pot on a cooker with a litre of water.Just to get
          that litre to bubble takes constant. Heating for minutes
          or imagine how long it would take to boil all that water
          away.Sure you'll have a lot of fuel but its not easily
          accessible.
 
  raldi - 2 hours ago
  Oddly, the satellite that did the mapping ended its mission in
  2009: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SELENEDid it really take
  until now to analyze its data?
 
    kobeya - 2 hours ago
    As someone whose job was once to work with that data, yes. It?s
    a tremendous amount of data and the resources allocated is
    often a half dozen grad students with a copy of MATLAB. The big
    iron is only really applied to create the official maps for the
    planetary science data archives, then real analysis is often
    paid for piecemeal with relatively small grants.
 
yosyp - 3 hours ago
For a more technical description, the paper is here: http://onlinel
ibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017GL074998/full."Detection of intact
lava tubes at Marius Hills on the Moon by SELENE (Kaguya) Lunar
Radar Sounder"Intact lunar lava tubes offer a pristine environment
to conduct scientific examination of the Moon's composition and
potentially serve as secure shelters for humans and instruments. We
investigated the SELENE Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) data at locations
close to the Marius Hills Hole (MHH), a skylight potentially
leading to an intact lava tube, and found a distinctive echo
pattern exhibiting a precipitous decrease in echo power,
subsequently followed by a large second echo peak that may be
evidence for the existence of a lava tube. The search area was
further expanded to 13.00?15.005?N, 301.85?304.01?E around the MHH
and similar LRS echo patterns were observed at several locations.
Most of the locations are in regions of underground mass deficit
suggested by GRAIL gravity data analysis. Some of the observed echo
patterns are along rille A, where the MHH was discovered, or on the
southwest underground extension of the rille.
 
  samstave - 3 hours ago
  If the moon had ancient volcanic activity and thus, why is it,
  after observable impact from various bodies - shown in the
  craters all over the surface, and the sumizing of the fact that
  water was deposited to earth from extra-orbital impacts... does
  the moon have zero water or atmosphere?Where did water
  originate?(I didn't know how to format that question any better,
  so please forgive the fumbly format)
 
    spdustin - 2 hours ago
    The moon's core isn't made of the swirling molten iron dynamo
    like Earth's is. No swirling molten iron, no magnetic field. No
    magnetic field, nothing deflects the solar wind that then,
    literally, blows away any fledgling atmosphere.It's believed
    that Mars' atmosphere was considerably more dense than it is
    today, but along the way, its core cooled, and it lost its
    protective magnetic shield, allowing the solar wind to strip
    away much of its atmosphere.
 
      u801e - 28 minutes ago
      I've read that it's the same case with Venus' core, but its
      atmosphere is far more dense than either Earth's or Mars'.
 
      kirillkh - 1 hours ago
      Then we have no hope of ever engineering Mars to have enough
      air for us to breath?
 
        icanhackit - 1 hours ago
        NASA proposes building artificial magnetic field to restore
        Mars? atmosphere: https://www.universetoday.com/134052
        /nasa-proposes-magnetic-...
 
        larkeith - 1 hours ago
        I don't know the rate of atmospheric loss, but it might be
        possible to introduce air at a high enough rate to outstrip
        the losses, making for a sustainable atmosphere. It would
        presumably depend on the availability of ice and other
        volatiles.
 
        LeifCarrotson - 1 hours ago
        A Martian atmosphere (not sure about a lunar atmosphere)
        would be lost on a timescale of tens of millions of years.
        That's very quick in cosmological timescales, but slow
        enough that any human effort to create or replenish it
        could be very successful.
 
          waegawegawe - 1 hours ago
          That said, the earth's atmosphere has a mass of about
          five billion billion tons. For reference, as a species,
          we produce about ten billion tons of concrete each year.
          This is just to give a sense to the scale of effort
          involved in replacing a planetary atmosphere.
 
          larkeith - 1 hours ago
          Depending on the volume of surface ice (especially at the
          poles), might it be possible to produce atmosphere on a
          massive scale via orbital lenses or mirrors? With recent
          advances in solar sail technology, I can't imagine the
          implementation would be too far removed from current
          capabilities.
 
    wyager - 3 hours ago
    The moon?s gravity isn?t strong enough to hold water vapor or
    any other atmospheric gas. It would either get siphoned off by
    the earth or just fly off into the solar system.The same is
    true of earth and helium.
 
      samstave - 3 hours ago
      Ok, and I like the comment about helium...But where did water
      originate?
 
        dsr_ - 2 hours ago
        https://cosmologyandspace.wordpress.com/tag/oxygen/answers
        your question.If you are trying to go back to "why is there
        anything?", then the answer is "we don't know precisely,
        but we do know that if those things hadn't happened, we
        wouldn't be asking the question, so so we have no basis of
        knowing whether it's random, rare, or a near-certainty for
        a new universe."
 
        lrdd - 39 minutes ago
        I think the short answer is we don't really know, but the
        simplest explanation is muddy icy comets colliding
 
          samstave - 11 minutes ago
          If that's the case, why haven't we been hit by any in
          recorded history that gave us more water?How many comets
          have hit us that were rife with water supplies to provide
          the amount of water earth has given that water isn't also
          abundant on planets that are much larger, like
          Jupiter?Why do we see planets with atmospheres of say
          sulfer, and earth doesn't have an issue with sulfer in
          the atmosphere?
 
      NegativeLatency - 2 hours ago
      Also it doesn't have magnetic fields like the earth does to
      shield its gas from being pushed off by solar wind.
 
    kurthr - 3 hours ago
    The same place that water came from on Earth... comet impacts
    and residual moisture from the impact that split the Earth-Moon
    system. Really the same place all planetary water and gas has
    come from.There's not much left because it mostly boils off due
    to low pressure, but in dark crevasses it's likely to stay cold
    enough to remain condensed. It's been measured
    spectroscopically.
 
      ealloc - 2 hours ago
      The reason water exists on earth, and not on mars, may be
      that life on earth saved the water by discovering
      photosynthesis.The discovery of photosynthesis caused the
      "great oxygenation event" which pumped oxygen into the
      atmosphere. Oxygen reacts with atmospheric hydrogen to form
      water. Without the oxygen, the very light hydrogen molecules
      would float to the top of the atmosphere and are easily blown
      away by solar winds, which is what happened on Mars. But with
      high oxygen concentrations on Eath, hydrogen molecules react
      to form heavier water molecules before they have a chance to
      be blown away, and thus hydrogen and water are retained.I
      read about this in the book "Oxygen" by Nick Lane.
 
        DougWebb - 1 hours ago
        That seems like it must be incorrect. Life on earth evolved
        in the oceans, so the oceans had to exist for eons before
        life evolved and the eons it took for life to evolve
        photosynthesis and produce significant amounts of oxygen in
        the atmosphere. If what you're saying is correct, then the
        earth either started out with much more water than it has
        now, or the hydrogen escaped a lot more slowly than I'd
        expect it to.
 
          ealloc - 49 minutes ago
          The book was written in 2002, and I just looked up Nick
          lane's latest 2016 take on it here: [1]His point in this
          new article is that instead of one big "oxygenation
          event" there may have been multiple. But he sticks to his
          story that the creation of an ozone layer by
          photosynthesis was the key step in saving the oceans. He
          argues both Mars and Earth had oceans originally
          (confirmed by Mars Satellite observations), which were
          gradually diminished by a process in which ultraviolet
          light splits atmospheric water, minerals on the surface
          absorbed the oxygen (rusting, making Mars red) leaving
          the hygrogen to blow away. But life on earth pumped extra
          oxygen into the atmosphere, faster than minerals could
          aborb it, creating the reactive ozone layer which
          prevented hydrogen from blowing away, thus saving the
          oceans from their fate on Mars.[1] nick-lane.net/wp-
          content/uploads/2016/12/Oxygen-and-life.pdf
 
      samstave - 2 hours ago
      Where did the comets get the water they impacted on earth?
 
        gjjrfcbugxbhf - 2 hours ago
        Water is just hydrogen plus oxygen. Both are fairly common
        elements in the universe.
 
          samstave - 2 hours ago
          Under what circumstances does one need to have in order
          to make them combine into water, organically? (Meaning
          without any device or machine, assume you have two big
          clouds of each element floating in space - if they
          collide, do the naturally just form into water
          molecules?)
 
          Retric - 2 hours ago
          They randomly form and are destroyed over time due to
          collisions at various energies.  It's also more common
          for ions to form in space which makes such simple
          chemical reactions easier.
 
          comicjk - 1 hours ago
          Yes, oxygen and hydrogen mixed together will eventually
          react to form water. To react, atoms or molecules simply
          need to collide hard enough to overcome their initial
          repulsion and form bonds. In space it is a slow process,
          because the pressure and temperature are both low - this
          means the atoms rarely hit each other, and when they hit,
          they don't hit very hard.
 
          kurthr - 2 hours ago
          At reasonable temperatures, yes, the clouds turn into
          water and release energy, hydrogen burns. Water is
          entropically preferred as a lower energy state than
          separate atoms/molecules because of lower enthalpy at
          reasonable temperatures. Depending on density and
          ignition sources the reaction rate may vary, but it
          doesn't have to explode in a ms when there is a billion
          years available.
 
          comicjk - 57 minutes ago
          That's not what "entropically preferred" means. If
          something is a lower-energy state, it's energetically
          preferred, but may or may not be entropically preferred.
          Water is NOT - entropy would prefer simpler molecules
          over more structured molecules.I think the concept you're
          thinking of is free energy, which determines the final
          destination of a process. The equation relating these
          things is (change in free energy) = (change in energy) -
          temperature ? (change in entropy). Entropy only becomes
          the dominant component when temperature is high. And, as
          expected, water molecules dissociate at high temperature.
 
        kurthr - 2 hours ago
        The big bang?
 
        sdenton4 - 2 hours ago
        Clever question, but it's comets all the way down, I'm
        afraid.
 
        spdustin - 2 hours ago
        Water is formed naturally when the oxygen created by the
        fusion process in stars combines with the hydrogen from
        those same stars, often after a supernova explosion.Water
        is fairly abundant in the universe. As are alcohols.
 
        comicjk - 2 hours ago
        Stars produce oxygen (along with all elements up to iron)
        during nuclear fusion. If the star is big (several times
        bigger than our sun), it eventually explodes and the oxygen
        then winds up in interstellar gas and dust. The oxygen
        reacts with hydrogen to make water. Eventually you wind up
        with a lot of dirty snowballs floating around
        (comets).Oxygen is pretty common and hydrogen is
        everywhere, so water (as ice) is not scarce in the
        universe. The only place where water is uncommon is near a
        star, like us, where the water boils off into space unless
        a planet has enough gravity to hold it in.
 
        JumpCrisscross - 2 hours ago
        > Where did the comets get the water they impacted on
        earth?Hydrogen comes from primordial nucleosynthesis [1]
        and makes up most of the interstellar medium [2]. Oxygen is
        produced when neutron stars collide and stars explode [3]
        as well as when some stars burn [4]. These freely combined
        in the gas disk from which our solar system formed,
        condensing into planets, moons, comets and other things
        [5].[1]
        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Bang_nucleosynthesis[2]
        http://casswww.ucsd.edu/archive/public/tutorial/ISM.html[3]
        https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/heavy-elements-forged-
        by...[4] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen-
        burning_process[5]
        https://www.lpi.usra.edu/books/MESSII/9028.pdf
 
          pjungwir - 2 hours ago
          Thank you for this answer! But then why does the water
          have to come from comets? Why couldn't the Earth have
          formed with its own water?Also, we seem to have a lot of
          water. It's really all from comets, a little here, a
          little there?
 
          njarboe - 1 hours ago
          Earth likely had some water during early creation
          (accretion) but the best theory on how the Moon formed is
          that a Mars sized object hit the early Earth at the end
          of accretion. This blasted much of the Earth's rock part
          (mantle) and any water it might have had into orbit. The
          rock part quickly fell back to Earth and the rest
          condensed and collapsed to form the moon. The water and
          other volatilizes that were on Earth were blown away by
          the solar wind at that time. The surface of the Earth and
          Moon would have been boiling lava at this point and had
          to accumulate water from new impacts of comets and icy
          asteroids.The water on Earth may seem to be a lot to us
          on the surface but it is only about 0.02% by mass
          [1].https://www.universetoday.com/65588/what-percent-of-
          earth-is...
 
          JumpCrisscross - 1 hours ago
          > Why couldn't the Earth have formed with its own
          water?We?re not sure from where Earth?s water came [1].
          Some evidence suggests the Earth was born with all its
          water, some that most came from comets.[1]
          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_water_on_Earth