GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-21) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
How Seattle Got More People to Ride the Bus
76 points by colinprince
https://www.citylab.com/transportation/2017/10/how-seattle-bucke...
___________________________________________________________________
 
Animats - 2 hours ago
Maybe the monorail plan will come back.[1][1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Monorail_Project
 
  curtis - 1 hours ago
  I think it's unlikely, although I personally would like to see
  some sort of elevated solution re-visited.
 
  r00fus - 1 hours ago
  That reminds me of one of the protagonists from the movie Singles
 
akhilcacharya - 1 hours ago
I wonder how much this has to do with employers giving their
employees ORCA cards
 
adamnemecek - 1 hours ago
My experience has been less than stellar. Busses coming 20 minutes
late or not at all. 545 at 6 pm on a weekday is so over packed I
feel like I?m going to second base with half of the bus.Seattle
should look to a city like Vienna or Prague. The transportation
systems are surprisingly well engineered but that might be due to
the fact that a larger part of the population takes it.
 
  Eridrus - 57 minutes ago
  I lived in Seattle in 2011/2012; the bus was so bad that I bought
  my first car. So maybe it was worse before, but I did not find it
  a very good way to get around.
 
  mulmen - 1 hours ago
  I'm not a transit engineer but I think this is because we are
  asking buses to do too much.  When a route sends a bendy bus
  every 10 minutes it's no longer a bus route and is now a really
  expensive train.  The Rapid Rides are packed at rush hour as
  well.  What we need is something like light rail that can go
  between neighborhoods and then let buses move people within those
  areas.
 
    taeric - 1 hours ago
    There are a multitude of answers.  All require space.  And
    building any of them will spike the problem for a time.That
    said, I think we are getting there.  I'm somewhat confident
    that the current problems are the spike.
 
      mulmen - 1 hours ago
      Agreed, I just wish the light rail expansions weren't going
      to take 20 years.  We need those lines yesterday.
 
    samsolomon - 1 hours ago
    Are several of those extended buses really more expensive than
    light rail? There's a lot of upfront cost for light rail and if
    demand changes, routes are pretty inflexible.
 
      bjelkeman-again - 57 minutes ago
      I read somewhere that the real benefit of trams or light rail
      tend to come from the fact that they often come with a
      redesign of the traffic flows, right of way etc. Whilst
      busses are often stuck in the old traffic jam.
 
        dangjc - 50 minutes ago
        Bus rapid transit is a great compromise. They have special
        right of ways with dedicated signaling and lanes. But no
        need to lay rail so costs are much lower.
 
        so33 - 49 minutes ago
        Bus rapid transit, of the sort you find in South America,
        has a lot of benefits of light rail without the initial
        startup cost of putting in rails for the reasons you
        describe: Dedicated rights of way, signal priority, and a
        lack of speed-killing sharp turns.
 
      konspence - 52 minutes ago
      Demand almost never changes. Most bus routes are still
      virtually identical to the streetcar routes they replaced.And
      the required infrastructure for light rail creates more
      demand for development along the line, as the rail itself
      signals more permanence to developers: they do not worry
      about it moving in a decade, like a bus route could.
 
      mulmen - 1 hours ago
      Every bus needs a driver and a vehicle with yet another
      powertrain.  I'm not sure what energy consumption is like on
      a train but I suspect operating costs of all the buses is
      higher than a train that can cover longer distances.  It
      seems to me a mix is the best solution.
 
    koenigdavidmj - 1 hours ago
    We're getting there. Slowly. The 545, the route he mentioned,
    is the downtown-Seattle-to-Microsoft bus, next in line to be
    replaced with light rail.
 
      mulmen - 1 hours ago
      That's a very long route for a bus to serve.  Light rail
      makes the most sense there.  What is the ETA on the eastside
      expansion though?
 
        koenigdavidmj - 1 hours ago
        2023: https://www.soundtransit.org/eastlink
 
  taeric - 1 hours ago
  I think the road work has been the main offender.  A single lane
  road due to construction is just as bad for the bus as for
  anything else.That said, crowded is as much a by product of the
  crowd.  Easiest way to avoid that is to adjust your times.
 
  somethingsimple - 24 minutes ago
  > Seattle should look to a city like Vienna+1 on this. The Vienna
  transit system is so fantastic that I was able to get around the
  entire city without even speaking German. I remember one day I
  was riding the U-Bahn with a local friend and asked him what it
  was like during rush hour. He said, "this is rush hour". There
  was still plenty of space for people in all wagons. Simply
  amazing.
 
  stephengillie - 1 hours ago
  ST 510 (Seattle - MLT - Everett, to reach Premera in MLT) was
  routinely 30+ minutes late, because buses would get stuck in
  traffic each way. So the common "2 buses at once" would occur. Or
  sometimes the 1st would be over-stuffed and the 2nd would be 5
  minutes behind and almost empty.MT 550 running 6 buses and hour
  felt the same in 2016 - packed in like a mosh pit during rush
  hour. That's when I gave in and bought a truck, and dealt with
  parking 6 blocks away instead of hiking 9 blocks down Cherry (and
  past the perpetual tent city) to the tunnel.
 
    news_to_me - 1 hours ago
    You do realize that by driving, you're making the problem
    worse? The real solution is to just get more cars off the road.
    There are few excuses to be driving alone in a city.
 
      madeofpalk - 57 minutes ago
      I don't drive, but its hard to argue against the convenience
      of actually getting where you need to go in a reliably
      manner.
 
      wink - 55 minutes ago
      Most people who do this (taking the car) realize that (if we
      all take the bus, it would be a pretty smooth ride) - but
      first of all not all people CAN take the bus (mostly those
      coming from further away) and second, I can't fault them. If
      your commute is like 30mins by bus and 15mins by car... easy
      choice for ~22 days per month
 
        erik_seaberg - 44 minutes ago
        A 30 minute bus commute sounds very optimistic. BART is the
        only system that has ever made me confident I won't waste
        30 minutes before even being picked up.
 
      jschwartzi - 35 minutes ago
      I wish this weren't the case, but I don't take the bus
      because it triples my commute. A trip that takes 25 minutes
      by car takes an hour and fifteen by bus for me. I test it
      every time I need to have my truck repaired.It's because it's
      a reverse commute, and so while everyone is trying to get
      into the city I'm trying to get out. The bus would be pretty
      good if I lived south of Northgate and worked in the city.
 
      marcoperaza - 17 minutes ago
      That is a fruitless battle. You are asking people to behave
      hyper-rationally to escape a collective action problem.
      That's not how people behave. People behave according to
      their individual self-interest. If it's faster or overall
      better (comfort, privacy, safety) for them to drive, they
      will drive.
 
Spooky23 - 1 hours ago
That?s awesome. The bus authority in my area saw massive ridership
changes when they added BRT to one trunk route. It dramatically
improved transfers and has been a boon to them.
 
narrator - 1 hours ago
I think what Muni in SF has done with putting cameras and
microphones everywhere has kept the thug problem under control. I
used to ride Muni a lot before that and would regularly watch and
overhear people graffiting, planning some sort of gang violence,
screaming in ecstacy while obviously extremely high after refilling
their opioid prescription at sf general, openly smoking their crack
rocks across from me, etc.  That's why people don't ride public
transit.
 
  dawnerd - 54 minutes ago
  I?ve been harassed a few times in Portland and that stabbing that
  happened a while ago stopped Me from using the max trains
  completely. There?s like no law enforcement on them.
 
njarboe - 1 hours ago
Personal, on-demand, point-to-point, high-speed, low-cost,
environmentally-friendly, and quiet transportation seems to me what
people want. This is what we as a society should be working
towards. Not making using a car so broken that a train or a bus in
dedicated lane is the better option.I hope Elon Musk can get his
tunnels with electric vehicles going and remove most of the
problems with our current transportation systems. By taking the
shortcut of making using a car a moral failing, instead of the
negative externalities of car use, we end up condemning a great
tool that just needs improvement to remove its current negative
aspects.
 
  lmm - 47 minutes ago
  Having lived in the kind of city that non-car-design makes
  possible, no. The negative externalities are inherent to
  personal, on-demand vehicles: they just take up so much space,
  even with tunnels the loading and unloading areas would take up a
  huge chunk of prime locations.It is a moral failing, but
  moralising rarely works; better to make drivers pay the true
  costs of car use (in particular, making sure they pay a fair
  price for the land they're taking up) and let them decide whether
  it's worth it for them.
 
    njarboe - 7 minutes ago
    I'm not against dense cities that were designed before cars.
    Those can be great and I really am happy they exist. I just
    think that trying to make Los Angeles into a Manhattan or a
    Paris should not be the goal of the urban planners of LA.
    Houston and Atlanta are also not going to be able to change
    that much. It would be very hard to do; really impossible
    without some kind of wholesale destruction by war. Maybe some
    other way of city living can be a great also. Let humanity try
    it out. There are lots of cities in the world. If Elon Musk
    leads a group to start building a tunnel from his house to
    SpaceX as an experiment, I'd say encourage that effort. LA with
    lots of tunnels should be much better that what it is now and
    could be something great and completely unexpected.
 
  icebraining - 1 hours ago
  It's very hard to make a car anywhere as space efficient as a
  train or bus, though.
 
    njarboe - 1 hours ago
    Space efficient in what way? Parking. I don't think this is a
    limiting problem. It is the gridlock on the roads. Tunnels can
    be put underground with a large number of levels if need be.
    People don't really like the space efficiency of standing
    packed right next to each other for an hour.With an automatic
    system of vehicles you can build a tunnel/track and can put
    into the system any size vehicle you want. One passenger, two,
    three, ten, twenty, one hundred. What is the difference between
    a car, or a bus, or train anyway in this system? Without a
    driver needed you can have vehicles of any capacity.
 
      so33 - 1 hours ago
      No, not just parking. For every passenger that takes a train,
      that?s one passenger not sitting in a car that takes much
      much more space. An average subway train can fit around 800
      people seated, and takes up much less space than 800 cars. It
      is precisely how much space vehicles take while being driven
      that is the issue here.Likewise, ?flexibility? is precisely
      the issue here. Why should a train carrying 800 people have
      effectively the same priority as a car that carries one,
      maybe two or three people?I know that it?s tantalizing to
      think that cheap tunneling can solve this issue, but you are
      just outsourcing the fundamental problem that traffic exists
      because people want to go places.A good example is going to
      the airport. People need to get off, unload their luggage,
      and there?s only one place you can do it, at the departures
      terminal. No amount of self-driving is going to solve the
      problem that the transport vehicle needs to stop, let these
      people off with their luggage, and start again.
 
      icebraining - 57 minutes ago
      Tunnels can be put underground with a large number of levels
      if need be. People don't really like the space efficiency of
      standing packed right next to each other for an hour.People
      don't like taxes either :) Boring is expensive, boring more
      is more expensive. And to achieve the same throughput of
      people you'll need something like forty times the number of
      lanes; just imagine trying to get all these cars entering and
      leaving the tunnel the same time as a single bus: http://farm
      4.static.flickr.com/3662/3398936283_f32ac7d42a_o....An
      alternative would be to have trains with platforms with
      regular seats, and platforms for transporting cars (like
      Amtrack's Auto Train, but open). Then people willing to pay
      for the extra space could do so.
 
        njarboe - 24 minutes ago
        A think we both really agree on the solution, just coming
        from slightly different perspectives.Boring is expensive.
        That is why Elon Musk wants to develop new systems and
        thinks a factor of ten in cost reduction is not to hard,
        with smaller tunnels being the biggest easy gain.With your
        cars on trains idea you almost get what I am saying, but
        why do you need the cars to go onto trains? Just get the
        vehicles to run close together and you have the density of
        a train. Imagine a tunnel with cars going at 100mph and
        40ft of space per car. One gets a rate of 13200 cars per
        hour. BART at peak does about 10,000 people per hour. If
        you mixed this tunnel with buses and cars with various
        amounts of people in them you could get a great throughput.
        Like you said, charge by the total space taken up by the
        vehicle. Bus rides pay a $1 each while the single person in
        a huge car pays $20. You don't need taxes. People will pay
        for transportation, just not many want to pay for others
        peoples transportation.Cities have a lot of their value in
        allowing millions of people to potentially interact with
        millions of others. Restricting when and where people can
        meet really diminishes the vitality and value of the urban
        life.
 
          pavel_lishin - 13 minutes ago
          $20 per car, 13,200 cars per hour, eight hours a day gets
          you $770,880,000 a year.The Big Dig in Boston cost $14
          billion, but some estimates put it at more like $22
          billion when all is said and done.So if you run your big
          cars through the tunnel for twenty years, you'll pay for
          one small tunnel.But fine, Musk can get it down to 1/10th
          - but the Big Dig is 3.5 miles, and you need to
          effectively replace highways. Unless everyone in their
          big car pays up front for decades of highway use (this is
          HN, so maybe we can use an ICO, why not), you're going to
          need cash up front - the kind of cash that governments
          that want their constituents to live in a nice place and
          prosper therein are willing to provide.(Someone double
          check my math and assumptions, please, I'm neither a
          civil engineer, nor a city planner, nor an economist.)
 
          icebraining - 12 minutes ago
          With your cars on trains idea you almost get what I am
          saying, but why do you need the cars to go onto
          trains?Trains - or Elon Musk's "skates" - allow you to
          use existing cars, without having to wait for the whole
          fleet to go electric and self-driving, but sure, in the
          future they could not be needed.An advantage that does
          hold even for future cars is saving their batteries for
          outside travel.
 
      Dylan16807 - 33 minutes ago
      > People don't really like the space efficiency of standing
      packed right next to each other for an hour.You could give
      each person a comfortable chair and 5 square feet of desk
      space and you'd still be vastly more space-efficient than a
      bunch of cars.
 
  mulmen - 1 hours ago
  Is that scalable?e: I could see it working if the self-driving
  ride-share fantasy ever becomes reality.  Right now everyone
  owning their own car wastes too much space.What happens to
  surface streets with the electric car tunnels?  Are the tunnels a
  supplement or a replacement?
 
  pavel_lishin - 42 minutes ago
  I don't like taking out the trash and sorting my recycling. Being
  able to just dump garbage out the window is what I want, but
  unfortunately, there are many factors which prevent this from
  being the most optimal option.
 
  PhasmaFelis - 1 hours ago
  Mass transit will always be cheaper than individual transport,
  and we often can't even get taxpayers to fund that. I love the
  idea of efficient, on-demand, self-driving vehicles, but a world
  where everyone has access to them is an impossible utopia for the
  foreseeable future.
 
    Tiktaalik - 41 minutes ago
    Also a world where everyone has access to efficient, on-demand,
    self-driving vehicles will result in a traffic congestion
    nightmare due to the poor space efficiency of cars. Even the
    smallest Smart FourTwo is much larger than a cyclist or person
    standing on a bus.
 
    njarboe - 1 hours ago
    When you don't have to pay a driver, I don't see why that is
    the case. A bus costs around 1/2 to a million dollars. A very
    good used car is 2 grand. Electric car motors are expected to
    last a million miles and the rest of the car, excepting tires,
    brakes, and batteries, can be made to last that long also.
    Electric cars are likely to be less expensive that ICE cars in
    the long run.Automatic vehicle systems today could easily run
    in a tunnel or other highly controlled road today. Small and
    large vehicles (cars and buses) could both use such a system.
    This would be a mass transit system that could work for
    everyone.
 
      avar - 59 minutes ago
      Because what you're primarily saving with public transport is
      not the cost of the vehicles themselves, but all the
      infrastructure needed if people who would otherwise take the
      bus all own cars.Sure, if the 50 people on the bus all buy
      used beaters you'll probably come out ahead, but once you
      start thinking about the real cost of the land in big cities
      needed to park those 50 cars it gets expensive real fast, and
      that's before factoring in extra load on the road system and
      other externalities.
 
        njarboe - 46 minutes ago
        Yes, I agree. That's why a multi-level tunnel system with
        automatic vehicles is needed if we would like to have our
        world get better instead of worse. Hope we can try it and
        see if it works at least.
 
      [deleted]
 
      pwagland - 25 minutes ago
      Interestingly enough, in the UK, that 1/2 million cost
      (345,000GBP is about 1/2 million USD) is the 14 year running
      cost[1]. That doesn't make it cheap, but suddenly that 2K car
      is not 2K when looking at the 14 year running cost.[1]
      https://londonist.com/2013/05/new-bus-for-london-cost-
      reveal...
 
      lovich - 8 minutes ago
      You're comparing what I assume is high end bus costs, as the
      prices I found for buses were much lower[1], to low end car
      costs and still ignoring the infrastructure costs. Yes buses
      and trains cost more per car but they use far less space
      during transit. Since our transit problems are due to peak
      throughout times we need far more infrastructure in terms of
      highways, bridges, etc if we plan around cars than if we plan
      around mass transit. As the poster you replied to said, if we
      can't get people to agree to fund mass transit due to the
      sticker shock when it's a much smaller price than building a
      highway or making tunnels, how are we going to get people to
      agree to fund all this extra infrastructure we'd need for
      everyone to have their own car for all
      transportation?[1]https://www.thoughtco.com/bus-cost-to-
      purchase-and-operate-2...
 
loukrazy - 1 hours ago
For some commutes in Seattle the bus is way faster than trying to
drive out of downtown. The bus tunnel is pretty fantastic.
 
ronnier - 1 hours ago
The problem in the Seattle area (including Kirkland and surrounding
areas) continues to be 1) Park and rides are completely full by
8:30 2) street parking was stopped in many areas by making it 2 to
4 hours only 3) many waiting areas have no cover -- so you'll stand
in the rain waiting for a late bus.
 
  somethingsimple - 27 minutes ago
  > many waiting areas have no cover -- so you'll stand in the rain
  waiting for a late bus.This is something I don't get about the
  Seattle area. It's like people here are in complete denial about
  the fact that it rains for 9 months a year. It's not just bus
  stops - my daughter says recess at school sucks most of the year
  because the playground and other play areas are all uncovered. So
  all the kids have to stay stuck in a very limited covered area
  where there's nothing for them to do. Same thing with parks - no
  covered playgrounds or places where people can sit and relax
  without getting wet.
 
jorblumesea - 35 minutes ago
All of these are great things, but I think there's a few other
practical considerations the author missed:1) Paying for parking is
really expensive compared to other cities. A downtown parking spot
is easily ~$300/month.2) Most employers subsidize orca cards
(transit pass) but do not subsidize parking spots3) With Seattle
traffic being as bad as it is, most buses are just as fast as cars
because of the prioritization they get. In any other city the bus
takes twice as long. In Seattle it's on par with driving.4)
Seattle's natural geography encourages density which makes public
transit more effective. Most new hires and population growth is
also happening in the closer in neighborhoods which are already
well connected to transit.5) Suburban commuting is harshly punished
by the above geographical and societal pressures. If you live in
Woodinville and commute to the SLU you're looking at 1hr, one way,
on a good day. Similar point about population growth happening
close in to the city.
 
matt_the_bass - 1 hours ago
My city ?solved? the bus traffic issue by reducing bus coverage
during rush hour. No wonder no one finds the bus in my area
convenient.
 
jlmorton - 1 hours ago
I don't want to take away from the good things that Seattle has
done with transit, but it's worth pointing out that Seattle is far
and away the fastest growing city in the US, with an astonishing
3.1% (21,000 people) between 2015-2016.If ridership increased by
4.1% between 2015-2016, then population growth alone may account
for a significant chunk of that.https://www.seattle.gov/opcd
/population-and-demographicshttps://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-
news/data/seattle-once-...
 
  keepkalm - 1 hours ago
  And some of the worst housing affordability. People who move out
  of the city can't justify to drive and park in Seattle.It would
  be near impossible to navigate Metro, SoundTransit, and
  surrounding transit agencies without OneBusAway or Google Maps.
  Idk, SoundTranist also tried a massive money grab on car tabs on
  inflated valuations. They are doing just as much to undermine
  support for transit as anyone.
 
  shorttime - 1 hours ago
  They could be certainly correlated but why would you assume that
  growth automatically means an equal (or slightly higher in this
  case) ridership? After all, the out of towners all didn't take
  the bus there. Most public transportation I've experienced
  (subways, buses, trollies, local trains, etc) have a lower-band
  economic class, for reasons that I could only assume and is an
  entirely different topic. These lower economic classes aren't
  pushing the growth of Seattle's population. If Seattle is getting
  the middle and upper classes to take the bus then they very-well
  deserve kudos.
 
baybal2 - 1 hours ago
Does any US city have private run in-city public transport?
 
  krallja - 42 minutes ago
  Not in-city, but Fishers, IN has a privately run express bus to
  Indianapolis http://www.fishers.in.us/DocumentCenter/View/1665
 
  lovich - 2 minutes ago
  There's EZ-ride in Boston which has a few routes and uses the
  same model of buses as the mbta as far as I can tell[1]. There
  was also Bridj in Boston and DC, which wasn't buses but Vans and
  it was supposedly changing it's routes to meet demand on a
  frequent basis[2]. Bridj did shut down
  however.[1]https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/EZRide
  [2]https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridj
 
mikeytown2 - 9 minutes ago
If the park and ride lots didn?t fill up the bus would be viable
for our household. We actually went from using the bus to not using
it because of this issue.
 
paule89 - 2 hours ago
Well. If people start to invest into public Infrastructure and
Busses, Trams, trains. The quality will increase and more people
will use it. The same thing with dedicated bike lanes. Not for
every scenario. But it helps the people. The low and middle class
and that is the best we can do. Help those who don't have the
money.
 
  selectodude - 1 hours ago
  The irony is people who need better public transit are the ones
  more virulently against bike lanes.
 
    mulmen - 1 hours ago
    Can you substantiate this claim?
 
      mandelbrotwurst - 56 minutes ago
      I'm not the parent and I don't have any data, but I think he
      is saying that he thinks people in lower income areas tend to
      not be supportive of efforts to support bicycling and/or
      bicyclists.Just based on my personal experience, I think
      there may be some correlation, possibly due to the fact that
      bicycle commuters tend to be from higher income brackets, and
      that lower-income folks often see efforts to support
      bicycling as both a symptom and cause of gentrification that
      does not do anything to help them personally as they are less
      likely to be bicyclists themselves.Just my two cents.
 
    icebraining - 1 hours ago
    Is it ironic? If you live very far due to housing costs, bike
    lanes probably don't help you that much.