GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-21) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Beating the bookies - how the online sports betting market is
rigged
54 points by zeristor
https://arxiv.org/abs/1710.02824
___________________________________________________________________
 
utnick - 1 hours ago
There has to be more to this story. I would like to hear the
bookmakers side of this. Perhaps the researchers were scripting or
triggered some other kind of security tripwire.Winning $900 split
across several different bookmakers is absolutely nothing in the
sports betting industry.William Hill, one of the companies that the
researchers claim restricted them is a multi billion dollar
company. They aren't sweating small time bets like this.EDIT: I
noticed that the screenshots they used as proof their bets were
restricted are for bets on very minor football leagues (Australian
semi pro football), its common for betting limits to be lower for
games that don't see a lot of betting action & is not proof enough
to me that the bookmakers lowered their limits globally
 
  mason55 - 1 hours ago
  My guess is that it?s the manner by which they were winning.
  Thirty $50 bets per week over five months is over 500 bets.
  That?s not the long run but winning at an 8.5% ROI over that many
  bets is probably enough for the house to realize they?re somehow
  a winning player even if the stakes aren?t huge.
 
    notahacker - 57 minutes ago
    I'd suspect it was less to do with the edge, which isn't
    especially huge especially over the short run, and more to do
    with the authors' unusual selection of bets entirely
    overlapping the bookies' ad hoc analysis of bets they've
    mispriced. Particularly since the bookies watch each others'
    odds (as do scripts sold to wannabe arbitrageurs on the
    internet). Having a subset of winning betters with an
    information advantage may even help bookies overall if they
    know who those people are, but they'll want to limit how much
    they pay out for that information. Especially if the limits are
    market specific, and the section of the paper highlighting
    betting limits shows a screenshot of an attempt to place bets
    on Australian youth association football...But $900 is pocket
    money bookmakers are willing to give away: around the time this
    study collected it's first data points I made more from fewer
    bookmakers just from intentionally +ve expectation welcome
    bonuses (and that was after they'd responded to the first wave
    of people pocketing welcome bonuses by eliminating them... for
    people from Denmark)
 
    utnick - 1 hours ago
    Sportsbooks in general don't mind winning players though,
    especially big ones. They make money off the vig and move odds
    to get equal money on each side of the bet so that they'll make
    money either way.
 
      valuearb - 1 hours ago
      They hate ?sharps?, winners who win through skill exploiting
      lines, they love those who win by chance. Sharps will
      continue to bleed them, the lucky fish often become whales
      whose luck fades over time.
 
    emerongi - 1 hours ago
    They're not a "winning player" in the usual sense. The casino
    wants players to bet on a certain outcome in some cases (in
    order to reduce risk, presumably) and therefore hands over the
    winning strategy on a silver platter.I feel like the casinos
    just want those kinds of bets to be small. They don't want to
    over-correct in the other direction. By limiting these players
    that specifically make these kinds of bets, they reduce the
    risk of a big amount of money being bet in a short amount of
    time on the "winning" strategy.
 
glenjamin - 54 minutes ago
I used to work for a popular UK online bookmaker. The thing that a
lot of these comments are missing is that bookies aren?t going to
sell a product at a loss. They?re also not even selling the product
you think they are (something akin to an investment).Bookmakers
sell excitement / entertainment - the thrill of the potential win
is the product, and costs approximately 10% of what you can afford
to stake.
 
mherdeg - 1 hours ago
Not mentioned in the abstract is that they also used real money:>
During that period we obtained an accuracy of 47.% [sic] and a
profit of $957.50 across 265 bets, equivalent to a 8.5% return
(Table 1, Figure 3).For some reason the "ok but how much did you
ACTUALLY MAKE?" is always my favorite part of this kind of business
or economics literature.
 
au_gambler - 43 minutes ago
> A strategy intended to beat the bookmakers at predicting the
outcome of sports games requires a more accurate model than the
ones bookmakers have developed over many years of data collection
and analysis.I disagree with this assumption and I think they have
painted themselves into a corner because of it. To illustrate,
imagine charting win rates against bins of price-implied-chances.
$3 horses win roughly 33% of the time, $4 horses 25% for example.
It resembles a noisy 1:1 linear relationship. Do the same for your
selections and your line will be noisier, but crucially you're not
taking bets where the price is worse than your estimate. This can
leave a window of profitibility when you subtract the two, even
when you are less 'accurate' as measured by win rate or KLD or
other measures.The goal is profitibility, not accuracy. The problem
with including the odds you are betting against as a feature for
your ensemble is that it dampens that window. If you're right about
your selections, you'll bet less and win less. * If you're
concerned about the volitility that comes with being less accurate,
there are better ways to address that.I've been doing this for a
couple of years and in many ways it's a dream side-project.
Location independent, no customers, automatable, and in some
jurisdictions tax-free. It can be a little lonely at times though.
I would love to chat with anyone else applying tech/math to beat
the bookies. Sorry for the throwaway, I'll put a contact in my
profile.
 
zeristor - 3 hours ago
Courtesy of
slashdot:https://science.slashdot.org/story/17/10/21/1744218/data-
sci...
 
skizm - 33 minutes ago
I always thought bookies just kept moving the lines until they were
making money at the snap of the ball. Their initial line isn't as
important as adjusting the line so that there is equal money on
both sides of the line and therefore the bookie is guaranteed money
due to the small fee they build into the bets. Their profits don't
depend on accurately predicting the game's score, just moving the
line strategically as more bets come in.
 
  dogruck - 20 minutes ago
  Easier said than done.Suppose your book is balanced, and you have
  $25,000 on each side. Then a new bet comes in, size $250,000, on
  one side of your book -- what to do?Or, more simply, when you set
  your initial line, what do you do when a known sharp immediately
  wants action on one side?
 
    CamTin - 12 minutes ago
    You open things up to select sharps earlier than the general
    public, with limits. They get the benefit of potentially better
    lines and you get the information benefit of what the pros
    think the fair price for any bet is, allowing you to adjust the
    line before allowing bets from the general public. That's how a
    lot of the offshore sportsbooks handle it, but it may not
    actually be legal to do so in Vegas. I don't actually know.
 
SubiculumCode - 1 hours ago
I don't see why we cannot have completely distributed betting
platform using para-mutual betting strategy that collects and
distributes bets and winnings on the basis of publicly reported
sports results with no take-out.I prefer para-mutual rather than a
house deciding the odds. It is  a more free-market approach. It has
been used in horse racing, but the takeout has been too large which
makes it hard to be profitable.
 
  dogruck - 12 minutes ago
  Yes -- customers don't like it because it's too hard to win.Said
  another way, customers will choose to place bets with market
  makers, instead of some paramutual operation.
 
maaaats - 25 minutes ago
They claim the market is inefficient. I worked for a company that
to some extend fixed that. Can't remember all the details (I worked
on a different part), but something like this:Most big betting
companies were customers. They all continuously sent their updated
odds to us, and we would broadcast to the other companies. They
would react to the change based on certain rules and send new
updated odds back to us. This would then converge.The inefficacy
comes from promotions, company X always wanting to have odds .1
better than company Y etc.Edit: Not sure how it works now, but:
https://www.betradar.com/  and https://mts.betradar.com/
 
antouank - 1 hours ago
Yes, of course you can beat the "popular" bookmakers.Once you start
beating them ( being profitable in value prices ) they will simply
close/ban your account. Nowadays, it happens extremely fast ( in a
day or a few hours, depending on your moves ). It's a well known
tactic, and in practice, you cannot do anything about it ( other
than keep opening new accounts in new names ).Try beating a betting
exchange.
 
psynapse - 1 hours ago
"Retail" bookmakers are only interested in mugs. If your betting
patterns indicate someone who is wise to the market, you will be
limited or shown the door. Be prepared to have arbitrage positions
pulled out from under you. The game is rigged insofar as the book
decides if it wants to entertain your position.If you want to make
money you have to bet against, and be able to beat the books that
know what they are doing - The high limit, low margin books like
Pinnacle, SBO, IBC et al will happily take you on.
 
conistonwater - 1 hours ago
> A few weeks after we started trading with actual money some
bookmakers began to severely limit our accounts, forcing us to stop
our betting strategy.Isn't this like literally one of the oldest
tricks in the book? I remember reading Reminiscences of a Stock
Operator, which talks in part about early 1900's bucket shops, and
the same stuff was there even then. Similar stuff is also mentioned
in market microstructure textbooks with market makers on one side
and informed traders on the other side.Is rigged even the right
word here? It might be, but did the bookmakers have a
responsibility to keep accepting their bets? Is it different from
claiming that casinos are rigged?
 
  dogruck - 17 minutes ago
  Correct -- the market maker (or casino) is under no obligation to
  take your action. And, why should they be?  The penalty for
  refusing action is that you take your business elsewhere.
 
watoc - 21 minutes ago
I don't totally understand why the bookmakers would limit their
accounts.The bookmaker wants to balance his book for each game to
make sure he makes a profit no matter what the outcome is. To
balance their books they might give better odds for an outcome than
what a statistical model might suggest.But what difference does it
make if the bettor who helps them balance their books is a
consistent winner or not?Do they prefer to give these "good" odds
to people who are losing money long term?
 
  s17n - 10 minutes ago
  Probably the bookmakers are actually OK with the betting activity
  that is described in the paper, but they have limits on
  successful accounts as a safety mechanism to prevent themselves
  from losing too much money in the event that somebody comes up
  with an unforeseen method of winning lots of money.
 
nnfy - 2 hours ago
I am confused. If the betting is rigged, then how were the authors
able to beat it consistently? What did I miss?
 
  Spooky23 - 1 hours ago
  Nobody is in the business of giving money away.So the bookmaker
  put controls on how and how much you can bet. There?s a reason
  why this stuff was illegal for a long time ? gambling is always a
  vicious cycle for the player.
 
  PeachPlum - 2 hours ago
  That if you keep winning they restrict your account.> They kept
  this up for five months, placing $50 bets around 30 times a week.
  And they were winning. After five months the team had made a
  profit of $957.50 -- a return of 8.5 per cent. But their streak
  was cut short. Following a series of several small wins, the trio
  were surprised to find that their accounts had been limited,
  restricting how much they could bet to as little as $1.25.
 
  downandout - 2 hours ago
  "Rigged" is the wrong word.  What it essentially says is that all
  of the data that a professional could reasonably analyze is
  already baked into the odds that bookies initially set, and if
  those odds stayed the same until bets were no longer being taken
  on the event, sports betting would be consistently unprofitable
  because of the 10% "juice" that most bookmakers charge.  However,
  the odds do not stay the same.  Once they are posted and bets
  begin to come in, the market takes hold and begins swaying the
  odds one way or another, because bookies change the odds in order
  to try to balance their books such that they have little to no
  actual risk.  It is in the swinging of the odds by the market,
  which has many unsophisticated participants - people betting on a
  team simply because they live in that city etc. - where money can
  be made, because there is an incredibly large amount of "dumb
  money" in the sports betting market.
 
    mikkom - 2 hours ago
    No, rigged is exactly the right word. From the paper:> Our
    strategy proved profitable in a 10-year historical simulation
    using closing odds, a 6-month historical simulation using
    minute to minute odds,> and a 5-month period during which we
    staked real money with the bookmakers.>> Our results
    demonstrate that the football betting market is inefficient ?
    bookmakers can be consistently beaten across thousands of games
    in both simulated environments and real-life betting.> We
    provide a detailed description of our betting experience to
    illustrate how the sports gambling industry compensates these
    market inefficiencies with discriminatory practices against
    successful? ?clients.
 
      downandout - 1 hours ago
      The fact that they limit the accounts of successful bettors
      doesn't mean that it is "rigged".  It simply means that they
      reserve the right to do business with whom they choose.
 
        pocketsquare2 - 1 hours ago
        They are artificially manipulating the market. That's about
        as textbook rigging as putting three masts on a ship.
 
          Spivak - 1 hours ago
          If you consistently lose money whenever you transact with
          someone then you're going to stop doing business with or
          try to limit how much you lose. They're not rigging the
          actual game in any way. But if they're not throttling you
          it's a pretty good indication that you're not coming out
          ahead.If there was an obscure way to play craps that made
          the house advantage negative they would either change the
          rules or ban the practice. You could call it rigging but
          by that token every game is rigged, that's the whole
          point, you're playing in the hope of beating the odds.
          The rules and odds are completely transparent, 'rigging'
          would be like using weighted dice.
 
johnzim - 2 hours ago
Just like the rake or the edge the house advantage of making the
rules has always been the reality of betting. Online or offline.
Forever. Get too successful and you?re no longer invited to
bet.Asymmetry of information has never been the bookmaker?s most
powerful weapon. The book is.Those who are successful at it accept
this reality. They grumble and make peace with it - paying the
super taxes and liquidising markets where they?re asked
to.Ultimately however, while it?s interesting to see how they do
some of this (and there are plenty of practices not covered in the
paper, I assure you) it?s a bit like complaining the DM won?t let
you do something in dungeons and dragons - you?re dicing with the
god of your domain so the rules can change at any minute.
 
ChuckMcM - 2 hours ago
"Send enquires about this paper to our newly acquired private
island in the Bahamas." :-)One of the most depressing things I
realized when I learned to count cards, and confer upon myself a
small but meaningful advantage in the game of Blackjack, was that
the casinos simply ask you to leave if you win too much. That put
an upper limit on the rate at which one could win. The folks who
figure out slot machines have a much better time of it because it
takes longer for the casinos to figure out they are losing money.
 
  GigabyteCoin - 1 hours ago
  I used to use the betfair platform until it they blocked
  themselves from being viewed in Canada for some strange reason
  right after they were purchased by ladbrokes I believe it
  was.Anyways, after playing with them for a few years, I was
  horrified to learn about their 60% tax on consistent winners that
  they have dubbed a "premium charge".Found some sort of edge to
  exploit and reap profits?Betfair doesn't even care to talk to you
  to ask you what you are doing, they will just charge you 60% of
  your winnings once you go over a certain limit. [0][0]
  https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2011/jun/29/betfair-premiu...
 
    phillc73 - 24 minutes ago
    Betfair merged with Paddy Power, not Ladbrokes.They probably
    stopped offering their service in Canada due to unclear
    licensing and operating regulations for their Exchange product.
    It has happened in a number of other jurisdictions too. What
    you need is a good friend or relative in the UK or Ireland, and
    a VPN.However there are now other exchange betting options,
    with at least some degree of liquidity - Betdaq, Smarkets and
    Matchbook for example.Professional punters still have ways of
    getting on, which circumvent the online restrictions. Once all
    their accounts have been limited or closed with the online
    bookmakers, the next step is usually a string of agents across
    multiple locations, working on commission, and placing bets on
    the punter's behalf. It's still possible to get on for farely
    large amounts like this.If horse racing is your game, Hong Kong
    is where the money is at. Huge totalliser pools (park-mutual)
    where the size of an individual's bet is unlikely to move the
    market very much. Now that there is co-mingling with a number
    of other pools around the world, one doesn't have to be in HK
    to bet there.I've recently started having a proper go at the
    Daily Fantasy Sport option, now that Draft Kings has opened up
    in the UK and a few other European locations. Moneyball in
    Australia is also quite good, albeit much smaller prize pools.
    However, this weekend they just launched a DFS horse racing
    product which looks pretty interesting.
 
  downandout - 1 hours ago
  the casinos simply ask you to leave if you win too much.I was
  actually backed off from the first place I went to after I
  learned how to count cards while I was losing.  If the pit boss
  or dealers know how to count themselves and identify you as a
  counter, they want no part of it.  In most cases, they'll either
  "flat bet" you (tell you that your initial bet is your maximum),
  or they'll tell you that you cannot play blackjack there.  Actual
  barrings usually don't occur until the second or third offense.
 
    [deleted]
 
  CPLX - 26 minutes ago
  I my experience as a card counter they'd just swap in a new
  dealer who would count themselves and just shuffle whenever the
  count got really good. Ridiculously unfair and probably illegal
  but what are you going to do, complain?