GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-20) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The story of the 1968 "Fuck the Draft" poster
74 points by smollett
http://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_never_before_told_story_o...
___________________________________________________________________
 
criddell - 1 hours ago
I've been watching Ken Burns' Vietnam documentary and it made me
think about the protestors and how the government reacted. The
people that protested should be very proud of their actions because
it feels like they were right.I wonder how soldiers or police from
that era feel about the documentary. The soldiers clearly were
ordered into a terrible war. The police can't be proud of their
role either.
 
vanderZwan - 2 hours ago
>  I don?t know how many people were there but it was a long line
of them, and the first people there went to where the public
entrance was, that large staircase, and they went up there and got
stuck up there, surrounded by Federal Marshals, who were not very
nice [laughs], with billy clubs and whatnot, and Federal troops,
who were our age, and were very nice. They were armed, but you
could talk with them.I suppose most of them also were only there
because they were forced into it, so that makes sense.
 
AnimalMuppet - 2 hours ago
A hippie burning his draft card?  That's a hippie?Wow, how
standards have slipped over the years...
 
  dang - 2 hours ago
  It's quite the other way around. That's what the early hippies
  looked like. When older people yelled 'cut your hair', people who
  looked like the guy in the poster were who they were yelling
  at.Somewhere on the web there's a collection of some artist's B&W
  photogaphs of San Francisco hippies during the early-to-mid 60s
  when young people began flocking there. This is pre-Jefferson-
  Airplane SF, when the cool band was the Charlatans and the
  aesthetic was 19th century retro. People dressed up in ornate
  Victorian and/or cowboy clothes and looked like what we now call
  hipsters. There were radical street theater groups like the
  Diggers and whatnot. (There's a good article about this period
  here: https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2012/07/lsd-drugs-
  summer-..., posted to zero effect by yours truly in 2012:
  https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=4123525).Anyhow, there are
  tons of pictures in that collection of kids in sleeping bags, or
  playing guitar, or sitting on the floor of apartments in the
  Haight. Everyone's hair is short by late-hippie standards,
  basically like the guy in the poster. The apartments look the
  same as they do now, except with less furniture. It's a brilliant
  collection. I wish I could see it again, but it's lost in the
  sands of my memory, and of course Googling for hippie photos just
  brings up layers of dreck.
 
    AnimalMuppet - 2 hours ago
    OK, but the photo is from 1967, and the poster is from 1968.
    That was more into the really long hair version of the hippie,
    wasn't it?  Or was that not until the 1970s?I note that the
    musical Hair came out in 1967.
 
      dang - 2 hours ago
      The photo was taken fifty years ago tomorrow (!), at the
      event covered here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retro
      polis/wp/2017/10/19.... Check out the photos?everyone looks
      like the poster guy. More here: https://www.google.com/search
      ?q=October+21,+1967+march+penta...It's hard to fathom that
      what to us is the normal-young-person look used to be so
      radical. Or that it was forged in a handful of years, an
      astonishingly short period of time. That's another thing
      about the photo collection I mentioned: to our eye, the kids
      all look normal. Deviant social experiment is the last thing
      that comes to mind.
 
        [deleted]
 
      [deleted]
 
  PhasmaFelis - 1 hours ago
  If you think the definition of "hippie" is exclusively about
  hair, you've got some reading to do.
 
  gcbw2 - 2 hours ago
  "The word hippie came from hipster and was initially used to
  describe beatniks who had moved into New York City's Greenwich
  Village and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district."You mean,
  how the standards have been appropriated by the mass culture
  behemoths trying to simplify history into easily digestible ad
  ridden programs.
 
    AnimalMuppet - 2 hours ago
    The article is from 2017; one could assume the 2017 meaning of
    the word.  Where the word came from is irrelevant.  So is what
    it initially meant.
 
      goialoq - 1 hours ago
      When you're in a hole, stop digging.
 
      [deleted]
 
  pavement - 52 minutes ago
  No, AnimalMuppet, the article explains that he's a "yippie" very
  clearly.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yippie
 
citizenkeen - 1 hours ago
Rather appropriate for today.
 
losteverything - 59 minutes ago
Oh how the internet has changed things.  We are so much better off
now than we were back then.  Information then was totally
controlled by the network and newspapers.  No such thing as mass
optional news sources.  Like blogs.  Or videos. Or direct contact
with author.This poster time warped me.  Recalling my father saying
while at the wheel of our Impala, "Look at that girl," to upset my
older sibling.  The boy had long hair like in the picture.Teens and
young adults died in a war.  The news machine was all citizens had.
I suppose you could say it was all fake news to some point but we
never new any different.  The draft was a ticket to potential
death.Now, anyone with a keyboard can publish anything and anyone
with a phone can read it.  No more Walter Cronkite or NYTimes to
dish out news in a manner they believed was fit.Growing up in a
midwestern university town life meant you believed your happily
married parents;  They were conservative.  Voices that disagreed
had to be sought out. And it was very hard to do so.  Like if you
really didn't believe in the war or wanted to learn more.  Where
could you get it?  Look, Life, Time, Newsweek?  The Library?  All
forces with editors.Now, we don't need them.  We have Facebook to
get others' thoughts; we have email to direct connect;  we have web
pages of groups positions; we can meet virtually.  Want to know
history, Google is my personal librarian.
 
  snerbles - 48 minutes ago
  > Google is my personal librarianWhile certainly an improvement
  over legacy media, are you not trading one information curator
  for another?
 
    losteverything - 40 minutes ago
    Yes.. but my thinking was not that that so much as the level of
    effort to research any topic.Say, for example, you wanted to
    know how your representative voted.  Or, you wanted to see how
    other universities planned for the March on DC January 20?  Or,
    you simply wanted to know the preamble to the Constitution
    (which we now have on our phone but I know my family didn't
    have that at home).
 
pmoriarty - 2 hours ago
I'd like to read an interview with someone whose opinion of the
draft was changed by this poster.
 
  vkou - 40 minutes ago
  Have you ever had your opinion about anything be changed by a
  single utterance?It takes a village to raise a child, and it
  takes many utterances to change culture.
 
  colanderman - 1 hours ago
  I think posters like this are less for changing minds and more
  for empowering the base. Seeing it could inspire an act of
  courage, or let you know that you are not alone, perhaps even in
  the majority.
 
sotojuan - 44 minutes ago
If anyone is around or in NYC, the Whitney has a great "protest"
art exhibition with this kind of stuff.
 
smollett - 3 hours ago
This is the second part of a series. The first part is about
Kiyoshi Kuromiya who was kind of incredible: born in an internment
camp, looked after Martin Luther King's children (apparently?),
wrote a book with Buckminster Fuller, published a gay rights
magazine in 1970:http://dangerousminds.net/comments/fuck_the_draft_
the_amazin...His NYT obituary omits the poster, but adds that he
was a nationally ranked Scrabble
player:http://www.nytimes.com/2000/05/28/us/kiyoshi-
kuromiya-57-fig...
 
  [deleted]
 
  616c - 29 minutes ago
  Similar diversion: one of John Lithgow's childhood babysitters
  was Coretta Scott King. That shocked
  me.https://reddit.com/comments/73fbct
 
  bfuller - 1 hours ago
  wow didn't know that, cool.