GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-20) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Australia Mourns the End of Its Car Manufacturing Industry
67 points by kumarharsh
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/20/world/australia/holden-automa...
en-automaker-factory-closes.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
chadcmulligan - 22 minutes ago
> said it was the workers over 50 that were particularly struggling
to find new employmentI always think it should say - there are some
workers who've been cruising for 30 or so years and picking up a
pay packet without reskilling. They probably won't be able to get a
job without spending a bit of time learning some marketable skills
 
Overtonwindow - 2 hours ago
I've always wanted a Holden Ute. Shame they couldn't find a way to
keep it in Australia.
 
billforsternz - 1 hours ago
I was reading a piece lamenting that Australia was leaving a club
of only "8 other nations" where a car could go all the way from
conception to mass manufacture. I will track the source down
precisely if anyone expresses interest. So I started mentally
listing the 8 countries: US, Japan, Germany, South Korea, China,
UK, France, Italy. But surely also Sweden? India? Brazil? Spain?
Eight seems low to me.
 
  abrowne - 28 minutes ago
  - Sweden: Volvo is Chinese-owned now and Saab is gone, I think,
  at least for now.- Spain: Is there anything other than SEAT,
  which is part of VW?- Brazil: I think they assemble a lot of
  cars, but I don't think I've heard of a local company, despite
  there being an Brazilian aircraft maker.OTOH, Tata Motors Cars
  would make India count, right?
 
    jpatokal - 21 minutes ago
    Malaysia probably also qualifies, although the local cars
    (Proton, Perodua) are crap.
 
    billforsternz - 17 minutes ago
    Foreign ownership doesn't disqualify since Australia was in the
    club until yesterday. I admit Brazil was a stretch on my part
    (basically I thought Brazil should be a member without any
    precise knowledge of how they're a member)
 
dariusjs - 2 hours ago
A changing taste, competition from European cars and more
disposable income is what killed this off. They?re really fun cars
I will miss them.
 
gaius - 1 hours ago
The Aussie economic model - export bulk raw materials to China, buy
manufactured products back - is a curious inversion of the old
British Empire economy. And it's one that is not even remotely
viable over the long term. Countries whose only source of wealth is
raw materials get eaten alive by manufacturing economies, then left
to rot when the mines are exhausted. There is a ton of historical
precedent.
 
  jpatokal - 22 minutes ago
  The sheer scale of Australia means that they're not about to get
  exhausted anytime soon though.  Only something on the order of 1%
  of the continent has even been prospected yet.
 
  andrewjl - 8 minutes ago
  Curious what you mean by eaten alive. Historically manufacturing
  was a sign of power and prestige, but now it's been commoditized
  in favor of financial markets and real estate, which is going
  fine in Oz. Countries that make things sell them for pieces of
  paper (or electronic bits) that aren't backed by anything except
  their and their countries marketability.The next wave of AI-
  driven manufacturing will decentralize things and you may well
  see this plant re-opened, albeit without people.
 
  dalbasal - 46 minutes ago
  I don't think it's an inversion. The British Empire got materials
  from far off places like australia in exchange for  manufactured
  goods, made in the centres of civilization where all the people
  are. You don't see Norway making stuff, you need more people (or
  less minerals) for that.
 
tinbad - 3 hours ago
Interesting detail is that the, for American market created,
Chevrolet SS was basically a rebadged Holden Commodore built in
Australia. Together with the Dodge Charger, it was the "cheapest
bang per buck" performance sedan with a V8. Although the Charger
still for sale, the Chevy SS died with the closure of that plant
making the 17' model year it's last.
 
  sp332 - 1 hours ago
  I got really confused for a minute because I confused the Holden
  Commodore with the Hudson Commodore!
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hudson_Commodore
 
tallblondeguy - 2 hours ago
I studied abroad in Melbourne in 2008 and it's crazy to see this
happen. I guess I left a few months before the GM bailouts got
started in the United States and the whole recession kicked off
after that.It was really neat to see a uniquely Aussie car culture
that felt really vibrant. I loved that El Caminos and Rancheros,
long gone in the US, were alive and well as Holden and Ford Falcon
Utes. It was neat that Toyota had its own Camry-ish car, called the
Aurion, made in Australia. It was neat that Pontiac in the US was
getting the Commodore, which was a great-looking car. Even though
it was still Ford, GM, and Toyota on some corporate level, they had
their own unique thing that I was able to discover while I was
there.
 
jpatokal - 2 hours ago
Aussie here: Good riddance.  This country is at the end of Earth in
terms of supply chains and export markets, has a small local market
and has extremely high labor costs -- all in all, a terrible place
to build the kind of megafactory you need to stay competitive these
days.  The only reason they managed to survive even this long is
massive government subsidies, and I applaud the fact that the
government had the guts to finally pull the plug.All that said, the
transition away is going to have a high human cost, particularly in
Adelaide which just doesn't have a whole lot else going
economically.  But my wife used to work for a Ford supplier in
Melbourne, and that city has managed to absorb Ford's shutdown a
few years ago without too much pain.  (Nearby Geelong, though, had
both the main factory and a steel mill, and is having a harder
time.)
 
  dalbasal - 51 minutes ago
  The subsidies were not that huge (at least recently), in the
  scheme of things. The local manufacturers were basically given a
  much slower reduction of tariffs than other imports, starting
  25-30 years ago.  Australia has generally been ahead of the curve
  in reducing these, relative to most places.
 
  vkou - 51 minutes ago
  So, without value-add industries, how will the economy of
  Australia function long-term? As an exporter of raw commodities?
  That has not worked out well... For pretty much every nation
  that's tried it.
 
    jpatokal - 23 minutes ago
    The service sector is pretty huge, particularly education and
    tourism.I'm more concerned about what will happen when the
    long-running property bubble pops, because this is propping up
    huge swathes of the economy (construction, banking, etc) and a
    lot of people have made financially insane decisions as a
    result.  Lots of people in their twenties holding multi-million
    property portfolios, where rental income doesn't even cover
    mortgage payments, because all you need to do is get on the
    "property ladder" and watch real estate prices go up 15% a year
    forever...
 
    dalbasal - 44 minutes ago
    Works ok in Norway.
 
      vkou - 21 minutes ago
      How well is it working in Sub-Saharan Africa?And, uh, Norway
      is diversifying its economy, instead of doubling-down on
      resource extraction. It's not actively de-industrializing.
 
        SturgeonsLaw - 8 minutes ago
        African nations have had a history of being pillaged from
        without and within, a comparison would be fairer among
        countries with similar governments and economic structures.
 
  megablast - 45 minutes ago
  I agree good riddance, but for a different reason. I hope we can
  start to move towards smart cities, and getting rid of cars. It
  is ridiculous the reliance on cars that people in cities have.
 
    bdamm - 41 minutes ago
    It's almost too obvious but... cars aren't going away, mate.
 
      ferentchak - 12 minutes ago
      For example the v8 interceptor will outlive all those so
      called "smart cities"
 
    stephenr - 13 minutes ago
    ... have you ever been to Australia? It's a big fucking place
    with fuck all people (compared to a lot of the rest of the
    developed world). The solution to society's problems is not
    "all get rid of our cars and live in shoe boxes 1 minute walk
    away from each other".
 
  corn_dog - 1 hours ago
  Yep, this has been a long time coming. I grew up in Adelaide,
  even in the late '80s the car industry was politically
  contentious, needing large tariff protection to be competitive
  with imports.  AFAIK the wind-down has been slow and steady with
  no sudden surprises.
 
okreallywtf - 3 hours ago
Another great story from NYT in a similar vein that does a great
job (I think) of humanizing all of the people involved:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/14/us/union-jobs-mexico-rexn...This
is a tough issue for me because I consider myself a liberal, and in
theory I am OK with globalization but it obviously has negatively
impacted many economies in similar ways.I want to be pro-
globalization but to me you really only have two (vastly
simplified) options:1. Be more isolationist or micromanage global
trade to maintain your own industries even though they can't
compete globally. 2. Find a way to make globalization benefit
everyone, not just the owners of companies who can cut costs and
increase profits. This most likely means some kind of universal
income and large education investment and vocational training built
on top of the profits of globalization.We appear to be moving
towards #1 and I'm afraid we'll all suffer as a result.My biggest
issue with globalization is that, while it makes sense in theory,
in practice most of the "efficiencies" come from dirt cheap labor
due to exchange rates, poor workers rights and working conditions,
and lack of environmental regulations (among others). Not because
other countries have developed better ways to make things better or
faster, they can just abuse their workers in a way they can't here.
You would think we would all benefit in some ways even if we're
just consumers by cheaper goods, but are they really cheaper or
cheap enough to offset the reduction in good jobs? Does anyone know
of some good data-sources for the prices of consumer goods vs
household income over time? My guess is our purchasing power has
gone down in general for the middle-class.I can see honestly how
this issue has given rise to nationalism in America, I somehow
hoped that people would see that isolationism is not the answer and
we instead need to rethink our economic model. Somehow Americans
have been sold (among many other things) that something like
universal income is a handout. I'm afraid we'll take the route that
the UK is moving towards of being poorer overall and reducing
globalization out of spite without it actually benefiting us.I feel
like as a liberal in America I live in a game of political jenga.
Want to stop abortions? We can only do it in a way that doesn't
involve decent sex ed or contraceptives (which leads to personal
responsibility). Want to prevent gun massacres? We can only do it
in a way that doesn't restrict access to guns at all and doesn't
cost any money (which leads to more personal responsibility). Want
to help out those impacted by globalization or those who have never
been on sound economic footing? We can only do that in ways that
don't involve wealth redistribution (which pretty much means
personal responsibility of people to  despite the fact that that
already happens in many ways (so we're left with more personal
responsibility and people like Shannon are responsible for a late-
in-life pivot to a new job with anemic vocational assistance).A lot
of the people that have been hurt by globalization are the same
people that support the party in our system that has taken most of
the solutions to our problems totally of the table. We're in a
straightjacket and could get out any of 10 ways but those would
involve tools, all of which are (claimed to be)
morally/philosophically unacceptable.I know this was a rant but its
been stewing since I read the first NYT article and this one just
compounds it.
 
  jopsen - 2 hours ago
  Automation probably eleminated most of the jobs. Globalization
  just removed the few remaining jobs.In the US you don't need
  universal income. Universal healthcare and free education would
  be massive wealth redistribution programs.In fact, the ACA
  (ObamaCare) for all it's flaws still is a wealth redistribution
  program.So if you fix your political system, it could happen...
 
  avar - 1 hours ago
  Don't take this the wrong way, but I think a more accurate
  description of your politics might be something like "an economic
  nationalist" instead of a liberal.By any global metric you look
  at globalization is doing amazingly. "A U.N. goal to halve the
  poverty rate in the developing world between 1990 and 2015 was
  nearly achieved twice over."[1].The whole process of relaxing
  limitations on trade has been a huge boost for developing
  countries who are currently on a runaway growth trajectory. E.g.
  look at the GDP growth graphs for the developed v.s. developing
  world in this[2] article.Yes we could do better, but it's already
  great. Yes as some jobs move to developing countries people in
  developed countries are temporarily displaced, but there's no
  suggestion that we can't continually recover from that
  situation.After all our societies aren't overflowing with jobless
  ex-steelworkers, ex-textile workers or any other industry you
  might want to name which has predominantly moved abroad.Instead
  we continue to lead the charge in economic development, but
  because of globalization we're increasingly dragging the rest of
  the world with us.1. https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-
  front/2016/01/20/the-globa...2.
  https://oneinabillionblog.com/energy/energy-policy/a-common-...
 
  gaius - 1 hours ago
  It's a class thing. Working class people say why can't my
  government protect my and my friends and my town's livelihoods?
  Middle class people say, why can't my government make my
  disposable consumer tat cheaper? That's why we have
  revolutions.Globalisation is not OK because arbitrage of cost of
  living, regulations, etc. The solution is tarriffs to even it
  out. Want to ship the factory overseas? OK, but there will be no
  financial advantage in it because the profits will be taxed away
  and the price will end up the same anyway. That's fair.
 
  snarf21 - 2 hours ago
  Globalization is definitely a challenge but #1 isn't a long term
  solution either. Even in the US, companies moved from Detroit to
  Kentucky just for cheaper labor. The other point is that these
  jobs would have been automated even quicker if it were not for
  globalization. Look at how much automated welding happens on
  these assembly lines even 10 or 20 years ago.I agree we don't yet
  have a good plan on how to give people access good jobs globally.
  I think it is just going to be a challenge until we can get
  automation to a really high level and power costs super low with
  solar so things don't really cost. Then UBI and service jobs (if
  you want them) might work. Very interesting to contemplate
  though..
 
georgeecollins - 3 hours ago
The Chevy SS is a great car for the price, but most people in the
US would mistake it for an Impala.  In California I think the
reputation of a car is more important than the actual performance.
 
  nradov - 2 hours ago
  Which is logical, because traffic here is so bad that regardless
  of how powerful your car is you can't drive any faster than the
  jerk hogging the road in front of you. So why pay more for a
  Chevy SS?
 
    cag_ii - 1 hours ago
    Where is "here" for you? California is a big state, and outside
    some major cities traffic is not the issue you make it out to
    be. CA also has world class roads for enthusiasts.
 
      vinay427 - 43 minutes ago
      Along with mostly great weather that doesn't rust cars and
      regulations that allow lane splitting for motorcycles.
 
  bluedino - 1 hours ago
  It?s supposed to be a low profile vehicle
 
verytrivial - 3 hours ago
Can we at least get a [paywall] tag on these posts?Edit: Down
votes. Really? I give up.
 
  amyjess - 2 hours ago
  Right click, 'Copy link address', ctrl-shift-N, ctrl-L, ctrl-V,
  enter.Make sure to ctrl-W when you're done.
 
    verytrivial - 1 hours ago
    Thanks.
 
  T2_t2 - 2 hours ago
  https://www.google.com.au/search?q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes...
  click the link from google.
 
  PhantomGremlin - 1 hours ago
  In the many years the NYT has had its most recent firewall I have
  never been blocked. My secret:Firefox: clear history when Firefox
  closes (including clearing cookies and cache). Also NoScript: no
  JS allowed on NYT websiteFor real laughs, an earlier incarnation
  of NYT paywall allowed access to everything except for the
  editorials. Wow. Talk about tone deaf. If there's anything from
  the NYT I would pay for it would be to block all their
  editorials.
 
  imron - 2 hours ago
  It's not paywalled.  Just turn on cookies.
 
    verytrivial - 1 hours ago
    I don't turn off cookies.
 
stephenr - 1 hours ago
This is hardly surprising when you know a little local history.For
reference: I grew up in Adelaide, about 15-20 minutes drive (15
km.. erm 9.3 miles for you lot)  from the suburb where the Holden
factory is located.I remember as a student/early graduate (so, 2000
- 2003ish) having.. acquaintances who were in their early 20's,
bringing home close to $AUD100K/year, for assembling commodores.
People who would laugh about how funny it is to let a car leave the
production line, with the wrong colour door handle fitted.Another
"acquaintance" took forever to get a resolution because his 2-door
ute was delivered to him with a 20cm gap in the carpet on the
passenger side. It went through the factory, through QA, through a
DEALER and nobody fucking noticed a 20cm gap on the passenger side
of the floor.These were not high quality cars being built by well
trained craftsmen. They weren't even average quality cars built by
moderately trained craftsmen. They were pieces of shit slapped
together by over paid idiots.
 
  [deleted]
 
  noddy1 - 1 hours ago
  The typical young Australian male is a pretty special breed -
  lazy, entitled, willfully ignorant and undereducated - the result
  of having it too good for too long.I would never buy a car built
  by these overpaid idiots when I could get a japanese or south
  korean car.
 
    crispinb - 25 minutes ago
    You've been unsurprisingly downvoted, but there's some truth to
    what you say, as long as 'typical' is parsed as 'stereotypical'
    rather than something more mathematical. Anyone who has spent
    any time in Australia knows the type well.My guess however is
    that the stereotype represents a shrinking proportion of actual
    Aussie males, though they're still there. We all have our own
    selection bias of course, but in my experience young Australian
    men are a pretty big improvement on their bald barrel-shaped
    shock-jock-addled beer-guzzling 4WDing
    [poofter/boong/woman/asian/tree/whatever]-hating coal-loving
    fathers who so despoil the Australian suburban landscape.
 
  avar - 1 hours ago
  And now in the coming decades you get to watch the slow process
  of people becoming increasingly nostalgic about Holden cars as
  survivor bias ensures that only the best specimens survive."Look
  at that old Holden! Hasn't needed a repair once in 30 years, not
  like these shitty foreign imports you get today!".
 
    vwcx - 58 minutes ago
    And the same process will occur with the memories of their
    jobs. In X years, a politician will harken back to the days of
    a strong local economy where high-quality products were
    produced internally and provided a living wage. Slogans will be
    created ("MAGA" works in Australia) and campaigns will be
    run.Nostalgia and lies are tricky bedfellows.