GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-20) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
A calendar of upcoming changes to the Twitter Rules
74 points by coloneltcb
https://blog.twitter.com/official/en_us/topics/company/2017/safe...
___________________________________________________________________
 
kelukelugames - 2 hours ago
I've seen a lot of anti-semitic and Right Wind Death Squad (RWDS)
memes on Twitter. How can the company be anti harassment when that
is allowed?
 
jhugg - 4 hours ago
All of these rules seem to make sense. They probably made sense 5
years ago?But seriously, why the grace period? If I condone
violence to promote a cause in October, is that ok? Just not next
month? Is revenge porn ok for another 6 days?
 
  zellyn - 4 hours ago
  Any time you suspend people, you need an escalation path, and you
  need real support people behind that. So you can't just turn on
  all the things until you staff up.
 
ProAm - 2 hours ago
Not being political but I honestly feel Donald Trump saved Twitter
from oblivion.  They were in dire straits last year and seem to
have coasted through.  I still sort of wish they would fail and
vanish, but I think it's significant they are still here today when
they couldn't find a buyer to save their lives not long ago.
 
  dannyr - 35 minutes ago
  Trump may have brought in new users but Twitter definitely lost
  users who just can't deal with Trump and his followers.
 
  rhizome - 1 hours ago
  Where are you guys getting this
  idea?https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15519111
 
adamrezich - 4 hours ago
Hopefully Twitter actually defines a lot of these nebulous and
highly-subjective terms going forward.What is the exact definition
of a "violent group"?What constitutes "hateful imagery"?Where can I
find their database of "hate symbols"?What constitutes a "hateful
display name"?What constitutes "condoning and glorifying violence"?
(I would argue that many if not most video games at least glorify
violence, from my perspective!)In our modern Internet-connected
society, the meanings of terms and symbols are subject to rapid and
unexpected change. The ADL lists "Pepe the Frog" as a "hate
symbol"[0], and while it's basically undeniable that many people
use the symbol in an intentionally inflammatory or hateful context,
I'm left completely at a loss as to whether or not posting an image
of Pepe?or any cartoon frog for that matter?will get me suspended.
(I have no reason to do so of course; this is entirely
hypothetical.)From the perspective of many people, especially those
who use Twitter, certain political figures are considered to be
inherently "hateful", and showing support for them is considered to
be an act of hate.There's a lot of talk about lines being drawn
here but no talk of where exactly they will be drawn.[0]
https://www.adl.org/education/references/hate-symbols/pepe-t...
 
  ythn - 4 hours ago
  > "What constitutes ______?""We'll know it when we see it"
 
    s73ver_ - 2 hours ago
    What would be better? Putting down a concrete list of terms
    that can't be in a name? So, what happens when the hate groups
    come up with new dogwhistle terms to get around that? We now
    have to amend the list to add those? And then what happens to
    those who created their account with that name before it was
    against the rules?
 
  [deleted]
 
  jordigh - 4 hours ago
  > Hopefully Twitter actually defines a lot of these nebulous and
  highly-subjective terms going forward.There is a certain
  "jurisprudence" to this sort of thing. All laws are written
  ambiguously; that doesn't mean it's impossible to enforce them or
  that the laws are useless. Human interaction shouldn't be
  codified into computer code and in most cases can't be.Whatever
  Twitter decides those things are, someone will be upset about it,
  and someone will contest the definition. That's fine. We already
  have this kind of thing in HN and Reddit and anywhere else on the
  internet where any kind of moderation happens. We had it in
  Usenet and in web forums.The whole idea that ambiguity in the
  laws means that we should have absolute "free speech" including
  the demonstrably toxic and hateful place that Twitter has become
  is bonkers. Sure, you'll alienate some people who don't like your
  definitions. But that's kind of the point. To foster the
  community you want to have.
 
    QAPereo - 4 hours ago
    To be clear, if this were written as a law, it wouldn't survive
    the first challenge in court.Edit: By way of further
    clarification, I realize that private entities have no such
    burdens when writing policies, but I was responding to a
    comparison with jurisprudence. That's not just a matter of a
    board making a call, or a CEO, it's the process by which an
    entire judiciary, over time, interprets law.This is really
    nothing like it, just a set of loosely worded edicts from
    people who don't actually have to issue them in the first
    place, except to pretend that they're doing something
    constructive.
 
      jordigh - 4 hours ago
      And it doesn't need to be a law either, just like HN doesn't
      need to set up a court and a trial every time it bans a user.
      Rough, ambiguous guidelines are ok for most internet
      communities.
 
      pjc50 - 3 hours ago
      >  if this were written as a law, it wouldn't survive the
      first challenge in courtI think you should see some examples
      of hate speech law, or things like the UK's maddeningly vague
      anti-terrorism laws.
 
        QAPereo - 2 hours ago
        It took decades of deprecating and degrading the entire
        judicial system in the US to get to this point, finally
        catalyzed by 9/11.
 
          pjc50 - 2 hours ago
          The US literally had "I know it when I see it" as an
          obscenity definition long before then.
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_know_it_when_I_see_it
 
    shostack - 7 minutes ago
    The problem is with situations like where our President tweets
    gifs promoting violence against people and news organizations,
    or attempts to instigate nuclear war via Tweet. Trump is
    obviously a gold mine for Twitter right now from both a growth
    and ad revenue standpoint (not even getting into the bot side
    of things), so they have a very vest interest in looking the
    other way.There's also a lot of dangerous precedent around
    blocking the POTUS.So do we just say "no violent speech unless
    you've somehow managed to get elected"?
 
  QAPereo - 4 hours ago
  There seems to be an assumption here and elsewhere, that Twitter
  or any such company actually has the answers to these questions.
  I really doubt that they do, and they announce these measures
  periodically for PR, to crack down on something, or just to
  reiterate what's always been true: they own their platform and
  everything on it.These highly centralized, privatized means of
  communication have gone from amusing, to sickening.
 
  golangnews - 4 hours ago
  You?re right, your objections are entirely hypothetical.
 
  bitshiffed - 4 hours ago
  Glorifying violence would also cover huge amounts of video
  media.I'm all for this, but I seriously doubt we'll see Twitter
  stand up to movie/television studios.
 
    zellyn - 4 hours ago
    I think the big question here is our President's tweets?
 
      cisanti - 4 hours ago
      What do you mean by that? Your president's idiotic tweets
      make Twitter millions, this is the only reason many people
      hear about Twitter...
 
        sulam - 53 minutes ago
        There's not much evidence that Trump is making Twitter
        money. People are not joining Twitter to interact with
        Trump, or even to read his tweets.
 
        balls187 - 43 minutes ago
        It's why Twitter has allowed Trump's account to get away
        with clear rule violations.
 
      adamrezich - 4 hours ago
      And the mass of replies that each of his tweets garners, most
      of which I would personally consider to be unilaterally
      "hateful", especially the ones that seem to always float to
      the top...
 
      Amezarak - 1 hours ago
      If Twitter starts censoring mainstream political speech by
      even the POTUS, I think that'd draw more attention than they
      want.Right now and in the future they can censor people that
      few people care about and probably have a much bigger impact
      without any outrage outside of niche communities.
 
      dragonwriter - 4 hours ago
      They aren't affected by Twitter's existing rules, and
      presumably won't be by any new rules, unless they are
      changing not only the written rules but the unwritten rules
      controlling whether or not they apply the written rules.
 
      notatoad - 3 hours ago
      They have already responded to this, the rules are applied
      with some leeway to account for "newsworthiness".  The
      president's tweets will not be taken down and his account
      won't be banned because of a blind application of the rules.
 
    cisanti - 4 hours ago
    Waiting for the rap music ban in addition to majority of video
    games.
 
      Spivak - 27 minutes ago
      * Every action movie or TV show.* All form of weapons
      enthusiasm.* Pretty much all anime and 'adult' cartoons.* A
      lot of tweets praising the military.* "Punch a Nazi"
 
  pron - 4 hours ago
  Many of these things don't have exact definition in actual laws,
  either. I assume that a more detailed description will be made
  available as those policies are put into effect. Law systems
  generally rely on individuals designated to exercise judgment on
  a case-by-case basis, and, I assume, this will be the case here,
  too.And even with actual law, people who may be satisfied with a
  particular law, may be very dissatisfied with a particular
  judge's interpretation and subsequent ruling, but that's how
  jurisdiction works.
 
dogruck - 2 hours ago
I think a big step forward would be a "right to be forgotten."
Currently, the Twitter hoard is free to dox, "parody" and generally
permanently harass any private citizen.Anyone who has attempted to
use Twitter's reporting mechanism knows it's a vapid black hole to
/dev/null.I've been told, "oh, people who hire a lawyer can usually
get traction" -- and that's ridiculous.
 
haydenlee - 4 hours ago
> Violent Groups. We will start suspending accounts for
organizations that use violence to advance their cause.Surely this
is just the spirit of the rule and not the literal definition? Or
will all nation states be suspended from Twitter?
 
  ythn - 4 hours ago
  Also what if members of a group commit violent acts? Does that
  mean BLM and Antifa are out?
 
  eterm - 1 hours ago
  Remember when twitter was praised for being part of what helped
  the Arab Spring?Now both corrupt and moral alike can be clamped
  down by these rules. Who will be the arbiter of what is
  considered a "violent organisation" and what is considered fair?
  Are "freedom fighters" on the side of good exempt from these
  suspensions or are twitter now simply too much part of the
  establishment to care for the next revolutions?I can understand
  that twitter absolutely need to clamp down on spread of hate-
  speech and the spread of horrendous videos such as those that
  were produced by ISIS/ISIL for propaganda and recruitment
  purposes. But vague rules leads to selective enforcement which
  could be worrying for free speech and democracy in future.
 
    Amezarak - 1 hours ago
    > videos such as those that were produced by ISIS/ISILISIS
    videos are what people are using to sell these policies. In
    reality, a lot of mainstream political speech in the US and EU
    will be censored by these policies. This is not an accident.
    Social media has succeeded too well in allowing normal plebians
    to spread ideas the ruling classes find distasteful.
 
      sulam - 51 minutes ago
      I'd wait and see how this gets used before we assume Twitter
      is now pro-establishment.
 
jawns - 4 hours ago
One of the things I think all social websites should take away from
these rules is:Processes that requires making value judgements do
not easily scale.There is so much in just this small list of
changes that really cannot be automated or done without some kind
of human interaction.
 
  drunken-serval - 2 hours ago
  Anyone that runs a social website either already knows this or
  learns the hard way. The real issue is few people who use social
  website understand how difficult a problem this is.
 
  s73ver_ - 2 hours ago
  One of the reasons why these problems got so big is that these
  companies tried to automate too much of it. Had they started with
  people moderating from the start, the kinds of problems they had
  likely wouldn't have taken hold in the first place.
 
eqmvii - 3 hours ago
Hopefully those  nitpicking the wording, timing, and implementation
of these rules realize just how deep harassment and hate run on
social media platforms like Twitter.Certainly the rules are
imperfect, but the amount of anonymous toxicity currently allowed
is IMO much worse than some clunky standards. There's a lot of
space between defending free speech and standing idly by while
people use your service to attack others.
 
  KGIII - 2 hours ago
  I don't think Twitter is actually interested in defending free
  speech? Free speech is defending the toxic speech. Acceptable
  speech needs no defense.
 
    s73ver_ - 2 hours ago
    Then count me out. I have no interest whatsoever in defending
    racial slurs or rape threats.
 
      nate_meurer - 2 hours ago
      That's understandable.  However, while threats of violence
      are not protected speech in the U.S., insults (e.g., racial
      slurs) absolutely are, and that protection is the reason you
      can't be punished for insulting cops, for example, or
      whatever else might hurt someone's feelings.
 
        pjc50 - 2 hours ago
        Twitter is not just in the US, though.
 
      KGIII - 1 hours ago
      Thats okay. You're just not a proponent of free speech. Free
      speech is the deplorable and socially unacceptable.It was
      once unacceptable to suggest black people had rights or that
      women should vote. To think we are at the apex of morality is
      hubris. Thus, I feel freedom of expression remains a vital
      component in modernity.
 
        s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
        No. To say that I'm not a proponent of free speech because
        I don't support those things is completely inane.And for
        you to equate civil rights struggles with sending women
        rape threats is quite mind boggling.
 
          nate_meurer - 1 hours ago
          By the same token, your insistence on lumping threats of
          violence in with racial slurs is similarly inane.  I
          don't hear anyone defending rape threats here.
 
          s73ver_ - 20 minutes ago
          I do. The person I was responding to is saying that you
          have to defend those if you wish to be a proponent of
          free speech. I reject that absolutism in it's entirety.
 
          KGIII - 1 hours ago
          You are not a proponent of free speech. You're a
          proponent of speech that you don't find offensive. It is,
          in my opinion, okay to hold those views.You're absolutely
          entitled to have those views. However, you're not a
          proponent of free speech. Free speech allows people to
          say all lawful things.Threats and slander are unlawful
          and aren't protected speech. Child pornography is
          illegal. There are many things freedom of speech doesn't
          protect.I have no major complaints about the legislation
          aspect as it currently is.I did not assert that rape
          threats were civil rights. No, those are illegal. Well,
          they are actually only illegal of they are credible
          threats.Slander is illegal. Credible threats of violence
          are illegal. Disclosure of classified data is illegal.
          Certain kinds of pornography are illegal. Inciting a riot
          is illegal. Credibly suggesting someone harm another is
          illegal.There are more but that's the gist. Those acts
          are illegal.What is not illegal is when some jerk comes
          and says, "I think all women should be raped." I think we
          can all agree that it is deplorable, but it is not
          illegal.'It would be great if all those n&ggers were
          strung up.' is not illegal. But, "I'm going to get a
          truckload of us, come back, and string up them n&ggers!'
          is illegal.That last one is illegal because it has become
          a credible threat.When the neo-Nazi marches go on,
          complete with their fancy clothes, and shouting how they
          hate K&kes, N&ggers, Sp&cks, etc... and throwing up their
          Nazi solute - that's legal.It's deplorable, but legal.
          And I support free speech. That means I support their
          right to express themselves within the legal
          framework.The right to express yourself as you see fit is
          very much a basic human right. There are already
          limits.So, I support all lawful speech. That is what it
          means when you defend the freedom of speech. Anything
          else is not defending it. Anything else doesn't need to
          be defended.It is okay, really. At least it is okay by
          me. You don't have to support free speech. There are
          probably a list of other rights you don't support. The
          rights I support are in the US Constitution. I'd like to
          keep them there, but I accept that it is a living
          document.
 
          kelukelugames - 24 minutes ago
          Wow, that's a reasonable description and stance. What do
          you think of "free speech" advocates like Milo and Jack
          Posobiec? And the people marching at the freedom of
          speech rallies?
 
          s73ver_ - 13 minutes ago
          Again, no. I reject your absolutism. To say that someone
          is not a proponent of free speech because they don't
          believe those things are part of it is completely
          inane.We will never agree on this topic. In the example
          you give, I do not see why either is acceptable, and I
          don't see why both are not a threat of violence. Someone
          being bombarded with messages like that is not going to
          see much of a difference.You're also ignoring the
          silencing effect the speech you're defending has on other
          groups. Few people are going to stick around somewhere
          that those things are commonplace. Thus, that community
          is censoring and silencing other groups.
 
  adamrezich - 2 hours ago
  I have to ask though... what is the actual problem with all of
  this "harassment"? Yes, many people pseudonymously post a lot of
  hateful garbage on Twitter, but it's just words on the
  Internet?if you put yourself out there as a public figure,
  assholes are gonna be assholes.A few months ago, a VICE editor
  wrote a piece originally titled "Let's Blow Up Mount Rushmore"
  (the title was later changed)[0]. Being a South Dakotan, this was
  pretty offensive to me, and my reply got the most likes and
  retweets, putting it in the prominent "first reply" spot[1]. I
  got a lot of very nasty comments from various extremely angry
  people, including one who implied I was a Nazi or something by
  saying "I wonder if "rezich" [my surname] is supposed to be
  similar to "Reich" or it's just some amazing irony"[2]I just
  shrugged it all off as the vitriolic Internet being the vitriolic
  Internet. I engaged with a few of the replies, but I let many of
  them just be, because really, what is the use in getting worked
  up over rude and angry Internet comments, that take nearly zero
  effort to post?I understand that Twitter improving its harassment
  reduction systems will lead to better experiences for its users
  and overall make it a more attractive platform for people in
  general, but there's this idea that it is the "moral duty" of
  Twitter to prevent assholes on the Internet from being assholes
  on the Internet, and I just can't for the life of me understand
  it.Words only have as much power as you let them have, and for
  some reason (which I won't speculate on here), it seems like
  everyone these days seem to want to give "hate speech" as much
  power as possible.[0]
  https://twitter.com/VICE/status/898266524183662593[1]
  https://twitter.com/rezich/status/898268626511306752[2]
  https://twitter.com/DejaVerdin/status/898817028663816192
 
    pjc50 - 2 hours ago
    You're lucky that you don't have to take any of the death
    threats seriously, and that you don't fear being fired because
    of what people are writing about you on the internet. Women
    generally have this worse. Sometimes the harassment escalates
    to things that are actually illegal, like bomb threats.
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/jul/31/bomb-thre...
 
    sp332 - 1 hours ago
    You realize the internet is real right? There are actual people
    getting work done and building relationships on Twitter. If
    someone posts information about you, others could show up at
    your house or lie to your boss about you. If your feed is full
    of gross descriptions of rape it's hard to get work done. If a
    mob of hundreds of people start wishing you harm, you might
    realize it's not just "words". And large groups are forming now
    to sway elections.
 
    burkaman - 1 hours ago
    If you hosted a party and someone got super drunk and started
    shouting racial slurs at everyone, would you tell them to
    leave? Or would you laugh it off and tell everyone else to
    chill because it's just words?> I understand that Twitter
    improving its harassment reduction systems will lead to better
    experiences for its users and overall make it a more attractive
    platform for people in generalYou seem to have answered your
    own question here.
 
ThrustVectoring - 3 hours ago
I'd be shocked if these rules get used on the "let's punch Nazis"
camp. More likely is that there's now additional things to point to
when "problematic" tweets get mass-flagged.
 
  KGIII - 2 hours ago
  Recently, someone posted a complaint about a Halloween costume
  that was a wall. That got the perpetually outraged group in
  motion, of course. One user said she would punch anyone who she
  saw wearing such a costume. Twitter banned her.So, things may be
  changing slowly. It isn't easy for some folks to see faults in
  people who agree with them. I notice that when I stand up for
  something on the political right, I'm often assumed to be a
  member of the right. If I point out a problem with the political
  left, I'm often assumed to be a member of the political
  right.It's very binary and people really aren't always objective.
  But, there are instances where this is changing. Some BLM members
  were recently banned because of hate speech and suggesting
  violence and some AntiFa have also suffered the same fate.It
  takes time but it does appear that they are being more honest
  with their enforcement.Of course, you still have the group who
  will try to interpret things as other than written. There are
  people who see -isms where none exist.On this topic, it has led
  me to trying to coin the phrase, 'If you seek umbrage, you will
  find it.' I've seen another person quote it, so it may be
  catching on slowly.
 
    kelukelugames - 2 hours ago
    Rose Mcgowan was temporarily suspended too.
 
  kevinmchugh - 1 hours ago
  This tweet got its author suspended:
  http://favstar.fm/users/nickmullen/status/827004333191491586
  because the rules and their enforcers are irony-blind. It was
  reported enough, by the sort of people it's mocking,  to get
  attention.If there appears to be a political valence to Twitter's
  rules enforcement, it's only one that reflects the relative user
  base and their weaponization of reporting mechanisms.
 
perlgeek - 2 hours ago
No words on actions against bots. I guess technically they are
already forbidden, so not applicable in a "rules" post, but still a
bit disappointing.
 
kevinmchugh - 4 hours ago
These are all just more detail on the One Rule of Social Media: You
get banned when you're more trouble than you're worth.There's some
obviously good refinements here, suspension appeals are a no-
brainer. There's been an undocumented appeals process where banned
users complain until some twitter employee cares enough to look
into it, but many users don't have enough clout to have that
accomplished.No added rules are going to protect users who write in
languages which Twitter doesn't employee readers of:
https://theconcourse.deadspin.com/your-app-isnt-helping-the-...
 
  brianberns - 22 minutes ago
  > No added rules are going to protect users who write in
  languages which Twitter doesn't employee readers ofHow would a
  user who writes in such a language get banned in the first place?
 
ThreePostWonder - 1 hours ago
And when the bans happen, the Butterfly War will be ready and
waiting to completely hijack their policy and AI until they target
the very people they seek to
protect.http://www.cultstate.com/2017/10/13/The-Butterfly-War/
 
PatientTrades - 1 hours ago
Without President Trump twitter would be useless in all honestly.
It was slowly dying similar to tumblr, myspace, etc. But Trump
revitalized it and made it a staple of politics. Great way to
bypass the media and talk directly to the people
 
rsoto - 4 hours ago
One thing that bothers me about twitter is that there is a special
case of harassement that is just impossible to report: trending
topics.Here in Mexico (can't say if that happens anywhere else),
every week or two there are hate trending topics against women,
other countries and indigenous people and these last for more than
a day.If twitter wants to be a ?safe and welcoming place? for
anybody, they are missing out a huge issue, as there is no way to
report a trending topic nor to find who created/popularized it in
the first place (so we can report it, altough I'm sure it wouldn't
lead to anything). I can't imagine what's going on twitter
directive's heads, as the trending topic is almost one of the top 5
things a new user sees.For what I can tell, these trending topics
are created by influencers and bots to flex their muscles before a
paid campaign, often regarding the government.
 
  jordigh - 3 hours ago
  I haven't followed Mexican Twitter much, so I'm a little
  surprised but not too much to hear that there are anti-women
  trending topics with regularity. Do you think this is a general
  Mexican machismo cultural problem or something that is more
  localised to the internet?
 
    rsoto - 3 hours ago
    Can't say for sure, but we mexicans are very hypocrite about
    racism. We look at the US and can't believe how they treat
    their immigrants, but we do the same in the south border. I
    have heard that we treat them even worse than what happens in
    our north border.There's a machismo culture and it might be the
    worst about ourselves, but also we look down to the indigenous
    population, saying things like ?you are so indigenous? to mock
    somebody who has done something stupid.Obviously we are not all
    like that, but when you look at the average mexican, things are
    not looking too good. So there's that, but also the thing about
    the trending topics is that it looks like it's created by
    people that gets paid to create them. And between jobs they are
    testing their weapons, focusing on a controversial issue (when
    you click on a trending topic it's almost 50%-50% people using
    it to make their hateful statement to those who use it to
    defend the affected group of people).Regardless, a platform as
    interested in their user's safety shouldn't be a megaphone for
    hate speech.
 
  beager - 3 hours ago
  I hope that this will be covered by "Expanded Definition of Spam
  and Related Behaviors". In fact, I hope for major action on that
  front because I feel like it's a force multiplier for all of the
  other guidelines that they're pushing on, and it's one place
  where they could end up marking down their activity metrics
  greatly, to the detriment of their revenue and stock price.
 
pavel_lishin - 4 hours ago
What's the difference between "Better experience for Suspension
Appeals" and "Educating abusers about our rules", and why does it
have different dates? Both seem to address the problem of accounts
being suspended, and not being told why.And will @USArmy be banned
on November 3rd for being a "organization that uses violence to
advance their cause"?
 
crystaln - 43 minutes ago
It will be interesting to see how Twitter allows Donald Trump to be
abusive and threatening, while not allowing other celebrities,
based on some carefully carved out definition of "newsworthy."