GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-16) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Keyboard latency
248 points by darwhy
https://danluu.com/keyboard-latency/
___________________________________________________________________
 
Stenzel - 1 hours ago
Compare with musical keyboards where not only key number but also
the velocity matters, so each key has two electrical contacts, and
the whole thing is usually scanned around 10kHz for proper velocity
measurement. Although key contacts are arranged in a diode matrix,
the latency is usually below 2 ms, even with good old MIDI.So
neither the keyboard matrix nor the debouncing justify a latency of
10 ms or above.It is nice to see that latency is an issue in gaming
now, similar to realtime audio, where most operating systems are
still not very usable - with the exception of OS X.
 
  xigency - 1 hours ago
  Now to learn to type with a keyboard... or game I suppose.
 
    lanius - 1 hours ago
    Now that would be fun! I think it would be possible to achieve
    a reasonable typing speed given the right "keyboard layout"
    (aka the QWERTY equivalent for musical keyboards).
 
wwarner - 58 minutes ago
I've been wondering about this for longer than I care to admit. I
always felt the perceived responsiveness of my old sparc 20 was
much better than pcs I used 15 years later, and I thought it had to
do with keyboard latency and interrupt processing.
 
colanderman - 2 hours ago
I'm surprised the "humans don't notice 100 ms" argument is even
made.  That's trivially debunkable with a simple blind A/B test at
the command line using `sleep 0.1` with and without `sleep` aliased
to `true`.  To my eyes, the delay is obvious at 100 ms, noticeable
at 50 ms, barely perceptible at 20 ms, and unnoticeable at 10
ms.Not to mention that 100 ms is musically a 16th note at 150 bpm.
Being off by a 16th note even at that speed is ? especially for
percussive instruments ? obvious.On the other hand, if you told me
to strike a key less than 100 ms after some visual stimuli, I'm
sure I couldn't do it ? that's what "reaction time" is.
 
  xbkingx - 6 minutes ago
  The more obvious example is to watch a video encoded at 10 frames
  per second followed by a 30 fps video. Does it look different? If
  yes, something's wrong with the statementThere are plenty of
  examples on YouTube if anyone's interested.
 
  AmVess - 2 hours ago
  Yes, and something like a touch interface is very obvious,
  too.Look at this video on Youtube from Microsoft Applied Sciences
  Group: High Performance
  Touch.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOvQCPLkPt4You can plainly
  see that 100ms is an eternity. While keyboards aren't the same
  thing, but high latency is noticeable. I had to change a keyboard
  because of the near eternity of when I pressed a key and when it
  registered on the screen. The difference between the old and the
  new is quite stark.
 
  gregmac - 1 hours ago
  Hm, neat. I notice about the same result -- 0.1 is quite
  obvious.If you want to blind A/B test yourself, run this:
  DELAY='0.1'; VALUES=(0 0); VALUES[$((RANDOM % 2))]=$DELAY; alias
  test_a="sleep ${VALUES[0]}"; alias test_b="sleep ${VALUES[1]}"
  Adjust DELAY as you want, and then use test_a and test_b and see
  if you can guess which is which, then run alias to see for sure.
 
    tomxor - 11 minutes ago
    neat, 100ms is blatantly obvious, I can't imagine anyone not
    discerning that one.I can get down to 24ms but no less... the
    weird thing is that 24ms is still completely obvious to me
    (clearly shorter but obvious in comparison to no delay), with a
    single test I can see which variable has the delay every time,
    but 1ms less and I can't... which makes me suspect it's being
    quantised due to any of the various things in between sleep and
    the output, display, driver, X, terminal emulator, CPU etc.With
    that it's actually possible that my 24ms is larger than 24ms
    and is also being quantised to a larger duration (but not
    larger than 100 for sure).It would be interesting to be able to
    test with some dedicated hardware.
 
      spott - 1 minutes ago
      25ms is 1.5 * (1/60)... Is your monitor running at 60Hz?
 
  Risord - 1 hours ago
  Btw your display can be the next bottle neck on 10ms scale if
  typical 60hz was used.
 
  azernik - 1 hours ago
  Another point is that, even if a bit of latency isn't noticeable
  (say, 20 ms), when added to other sources of latency it can make
  things noticeably worse.EDIT: Which the original author said
  better than me:> Another problem with this line of reasoning is
  that the full pipeline from keypress to screen update is quite
  long and if you say that it?s always fine to add 10ms here and
  10ms there, you end up with a much larger amount of bloat through
  the entire pipeline, which is how we got where we are today,
  where can buy a system with the CPU that gives you the fastest
  single-threaded performance money can buy and get 6x the latency
  of a machine from the 70s.
 
  stebalien - 32 minutes ago
  This rule comes from UX design user studies. However, the actual
  rule is that people perceive an event happening within 100ms as
  "instantaneous". Or, in other words, two events happening within
  100ms of each other won't feel like distinct events. This doesn't
  mean that users won't notice the delay and it doesn't even mean
  users won't be frustrated by it, it's just a matter of human
  perception of distinct events in time.Unfortunately,
  programmers/UX designers have a tendency to generalize this rule
  and use it to excuse slow user interfaces.
 
olegkikin - 54 minutes ago
Measuring using sound should be more precise. Even a bad mic has
orders of magnitude more time resolution than a 240fps
camera.Something like click-to-beep.
 
ChuckMcM - 53 minutes ago
I find my typing accuracy is affected by keyboard latency.An
interesting way to test this would be to use a sensor to note how
the point where a key was definitely "headed down" (say > 10% of
its total travel) and then waiting for the message to show up.In
older keyboards the main CPU was doing some of the debouncing so it
knew "right away" that a keyboard was pressed. That cuts down on
latency as well.Another test case might be to put a USB -> PS/2
adapter on the keyboard. This lets the onboard CPU know to send the
keycode as soon as it has decoded and debounced it.
 
petepete - 1 hours ago
I can't see the merit in that particular test. It's the actuation
point that matters.For more depth than anyone really needs, see the
r/mechanicalkeyboards
wikihttps://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicalKeyboards/wiki/switch_gui...
 
microcolonel - 4 minutes ago
I've been experimenting with alternative protocols to HID. I'm not
satisfied with fixed-interval input polling out of sync with vsync;
it takes way too many samples to reach the desired latency (and
especially jitter!) numbers.As for keyboards, there's no real
excuse not to just have a Bigass? shift register (or a couple) and
address every keyswitch with a trace and an interrupt crossbar.
There's a limit to how cheap a good-enough keyboard can ultimately
be, so a difference of a few cents in BOM and assembly, and
slightly more intricate membrane layouts is not worth crying over.
 
_wmd - 45 minutes ago
I'm no a hardware guy so this may be a stupid question, but while
watching the Microsoft Research video and pondering the energy
required to scan the fine wire mesh on the touchscreen quickly
enough to reach that latency, I started wondering why keyboards and
touchscreens scan row+columnwise at all..Would it be possible to
arrange the mesh in a kind of accumulator, where the top level
output for each axis is wired to diodes connected to groups of
lines (that in turn can be directly sampled) are connected to their
own set of descendent lines until enough groups exist to connect to
individual rows and columns.. something like:
ROW         RR1---------RR2----------+----------RR3------------RR4
|           |                       |              |       +_+/\+_+
+_+/\+_+                +_+/\+_+       +_+/\+_+     r0 r1 r2 r3  r4
r5 r6 r7            r8 r9 ra rb    rc rd re rf   So controller
sleeps waiting for interrupt from ROW, tests which output from
RR1..RR4 is set, then only scans the 4 rows within that group.
Computer keyboards aren't perfectly square but maybe a lookup table
could translate a perfectly square wiring configuration into a
logical key (well, I guess the microcontroller is already doing
this)
 
alasdair_ - 1 hours ago
Isn't a big part of the reason "gaming" keyboards cost so much
because they can register more than three keys (sometimes four)
being hit at the same time - something many cheaper keyboards
cannot do due to the way they are wired?
 
  DeRock - 1 hours ago
  This is known as key rollover, see:
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rollover_(key)It is a result of the
  matrix wiring of the keys, though more expensive keyboards will
  have them wired individually, mitigating this issue.
 
  munchbunny - 26 minutes ago
  Yes, n-key rollover sometimes comes up. In practice, I've only
  had it become an issue in the wild either when more than one
  player is sharing the keyboard or, in some rare games, primarily
  simulators, where you might need to hold multiple keys.
 
korethr - 2 hours ago
IMO, a better measure would be from activation of the switch, as
opposed to the beginning of key travel. I don't start waiting for
the character to appear on my screen from the moment I begin to
press down. My anticipation begins when I feel the tactile feedback
of the switch activating (or the switch bottoming out on switches
that don't offer tactile feedback). On a keyboard with good tactile
feedback, I might not move the switch through it's full travel --
just a little bit above and below the activation and reset points.
 
  Nition - 2 hours ago
  I wouldn't be surprised if the Apple keyboard is the fastest just
  because it has very shallow keys.
 
    robotresearcher - 20 minutes ago
    Quoth the fine article:> Contrast this to the Apple keyboard
    measured, where the key travel is so short that it can?t be
    captured with a 240 fps camera, indicating that the key travel
    time is < 4ms.
 
    Heliosmaster - 2 hours ago
    They mentioned it being a likely culprit in the article :)
 
      Nition - 2 hours ago
      Oops, yeah I just got to that part. My fault for not reading
      past the conclusion before posting.Still, I guess in a way,
      timing it from the start of a key press is the most real
      measure of actual latency when you want to press a key. It's
      just got nothing to do with the processor etc.
 
    zitterbewegung - 1 hours ago
    This is anecdotal so YMMV. I have a Macbook Pro 2017 and the
    shallow key travel makes me feel like its more accurate than
    the one on my previous Macbook Pro 2015 with longer key travel.
    Also, I feel like I am typing faster.
 
    marssaxman - 1 hours ago
    Sounds like a good argument for the superiority of shallow
    keys. I've always liked Apple keyboards - actually used their
    wired USB keyboard for a long time specifically because it felt
    like typing on a Powerbook.
 
      codemonkeymike - 1 hours ago
      Superior is a strong word, if your preference is to bottom
      out flat keys then thats all well and good. I personally type
      like I am playing an instrument, pressing just enough to
      activate and then letting the key push my finger up. I find
      no enjoyment on typing on an apple keyboard, which I am now
      and it also causes me joint pain from all the constant
      bottoming out.
 
    andyfleming - 1 hours ago
    That's fine though. It's about the experience end-to-end. I
    love the apple keyboards. I still type faster on them than
    other keyboards, including high-end mechanical keyboards. The
    short keys and actuation feel responsive, yet I've never felt
    like I've accidentally triggered a key.
 
      baxuz - 59 minutes ago
      I'm currently using a mechanical 60% keyboard with the
      following layout: http://www.keyboard-layout-
      editor.com/#/gists/c7f9f0ac904b21...Truth be told, I also
      prefer scissor switch keyboards, but there aren't any on the
      market that support the features I'd like: - configurable
      keys & layers on a hardware level - 60% layout - NKROApple's
      magic keyboard would be great if it supported
      configuration/NKRO and didn't cost so outrageously much.
 
        hueving - 37 minutes ago
        Custom build at wasd keyboards work? I love that place.
 
      cjbprime - 1 hours ago
      Same -- I like doing speed typing on typeracer, and after
      going through mech keyboards and different switch types for a
      few years, I'm consistently fastest on a non-mechanical
      ThinkPad USB chiclet keyboard.
 
        confounded - 1 hours ago
        I've recently got rid of several extremely expensive
        mechanical keyboards to go back to a new ThinkPad chiclet.
        I am somewhat embarrassed to say it's been fantastic.
 
      bhj - 1 hours ago
      Agreed, and I don't understand the hate many people (seem to)
      have for them - the most ergonomic keyboards are those that
      require the least amount of repetitive motion. Not that there
      isn't an adjustment period, but some seem to pull out their
      Jump To Conclusion mats a little early.
 
        deathanatos - 54 minutes ago
        There's essentially no range of motion in a MBP keyboard
        anymore: there is no difference between not pressing the
        key, actuating the key, and bottoming out the key. Some
        people (such as yourself) seem to prefer it, but to me it
        feels much rougher than comparable keyboards, like typing
        on a hard plastic surface. There is no give or play in the
        keystroke. Compared to a Lenovo T460p's keyboard (the other
        machine I own), the Lenovo is a lot "softer" to type on.
        (And quieter, too.) Mostly, I dislike the feel.Now, my
        wrists also hurt. Now, when I'm not travelling, I was using
        an external Apple keyboard, not the MBP's primarily, so I'm
        hesitant to blame the MBP's keyboard directly. The external
        Apple keyboard has a greater keystroke distance from start
        to bottoming out, but still has like zero distance between
        actuation and bottoming out. (For some keystrokes,
        particularly ^+Tab and ^+Shift+Tab, I find it hard to keep
        control actuated, despite it being fully depressed; it just
        seems to require a lot of pressure to keep things in
        electrical contact). The pain in my wrists didn't start
        until I started using Apple keyboards, and has mostly
        stopped since I've replaced them. (I now primarily use an
        ErgoDox EZ, primarily for the split/ability to
        independently position my hands. I had tried, and had
        similar success w/ a Kinesis Freestyle, but I didn't own
        it.)(I used a MBP keyboard for ~4yrs, with an ergo keyboard
        of some kind for when I'm not travelling for ~half of that.
        I've used Thinkpad's of varying models for ~10 years. Now,
        I could just be getting old, but replacing the Apple
        keyboard is what made the difference thus far for me. It
        doesn't make a lot of sense to me, admittedly: my wrists
        are, I feel, in the same bad position on the Lenovo as they
        are on the MBP/Apple keyboard.)
 
        bitwize - 6 minutes ago
        If you can't adjust to an Apple keyboard (and don't have
        RSI), the problem is you -- not the keyboard. Retrain
        yourself to type softly.
 
        ewjordan - 23 minutes ago
        "the most ergonomic keyboards are those that require the
        least amount of repetitive motion"Not sure I can agree with
        that. I was using one of the Apple keyboards for quite a
        long time while running liveops on an online game (which
        meant rapid response whenever incidents happened, jumping
        into shells and constantly typing like my life depended on
        it), and developed fairly severe wrist problems within a
        couple months. To the point where I almost had to leave the
        job on disability, per my doctor's orders.On the
        recommendation of a friend, before taking that step I tried
        switching to a Kinesis Advantage for the better wrist
        alignment and less "hard" keystroke bottom as compared to
        the chiclets on the Apple keyboard. It was a bit of a
        learning curve (~2 weeks to get up to full typing speed
        when using it every day, a couple more to push past it),
        but at the end of it my wrists got better almost instantly,
        and I never had problems again. My typing speed went up as
        well.I'm not sure how much of that improvement is due to
        the better alignment of keys (there's almost no hand
        movement when typing, and your wrists are always neutral)
        and how much is due to the bigger key action and softer
        bottom, to be fair.Edit: it's worth mentioning that I'm
        also a boxer and a piano player, so my wrists take a lot of
        abuse on a regular basis. YMMV and if you're not having
        problems, I definitely found the Apple keyboards to be very
        easy and fast to use.
 
      krashidov - 1 hours ago
      Agreed. When I first used them I hated them, now I can't
      really use anything else.
 
  ehsankia - 12 minutes ago
  Actual activation might be hard to get, but when the key bottoms
  out is probably the best way to go. Or even better, why not post
  both when key travel starts and when it ends. If people are
  really curious, they can model a linear scale and use the key
  response plot to guess exactly where the activation happens.
 
  baxuz - 49 minutes ago
  A weird result with the Das 3 keyboard (25ms) considering it uses
  a cherry MX switch, same as the Kinesis (55ms).The OLKB and
  Ergodox don't state the switches used, but it's almost certainly
  a cherry MX style switch with non-modified actuation points
  compared to the original.
 
  bastijn - 2 hours ago
  Didn?t watch good enough. There are mechanical keyboards in the
  review as mentioned below. My bad. Original comment below for
  future reference.? - original comment ? -True gaming keyboards
  have  mechanical switches which activate on first key press, not
  on full key down. Bit disappointed no mechanical keyboard was
  tested as they are perceived to be the ultimate keyboards when
  speed matters.
 
    dom0 - 1 hours ago
    > which activate on first key pressNo, mechanical keys have
    some travel before actuation as well.
 
    mhweaver - 1 hours ago
    I see several mechanical keyboards in the list (das, ergodox,
    kinesis advantage, olkb planck, possibly others)
 
    [deleted]
 
    eikenberry - 1 hours ago
    Mechanical key switching activate differently based on the
    switch. Most with feedback activate on the feedback, ie. when
    you hear/feel the click. So it isn't first press or full key
    down, but somewhere in the middle.
 
    vith - 1 hours ago
    The most common key switch for gaming oriented mechanical
    keyboards is probably the Cherry MX Red. Its actuation point is
    around 50% of the way through the key travel.Buckling spring
    switches, membrane domes, topre (membrane dome + spring), etc.
    all have actuation points somewhere in the middle of the key
    travel, not at the start or end.
 
  DeepYogurt - 1 hours ago
  Further those gaming keyboards have longer than normal key
  travel.
 
  mjw1007 - 2 hours ago
  I agree.Presumably he measured it the way he did because it's
  easier to measure, rather than because he thinks it's the more
  meaningful way.(Though maybe his way is more useful if he's
  interested in whether a keyboard gives an advantage in gaming,
  rather than whether it's pleasant to type with.)
 
    ehsankia - 14 minutes ago
    If you want a clear point, then why not use the moment it
    bottoms out. So when key travel ends, instead of when key
    travel starts. In most cases, it'll be much closer to the
    actual activation. If you want to be even more thorough,
    publish both times (which you can get from a single video).
 
    LoSboccacc - 1 hours ago
    the article specifically states the reasons for why he messured
    the whole travel, no guesswork needed> This is because, as a
    human, you don?t activate the switch, you press the key. A
    measurement that starts from switch activiation time misses
    this large component to latency.
 
      mjw1007 - 1 hours ago
      That's effectively providing a definition of the latency he's
      discussing, not an explanation of why that's the sort of
      latency he finds interesting.But I see he does goes on to say
      that he cares about game performance, rather than typing
      experience: ? If, for example, you?re playing a game and
      start dodging when you see something happen, you have pay the
      cost of the key movement, which is different for different
      keyboards. ?For me, I don't care about the time after switch
      activation, rather about time after the tactile feedback (the
      "click"). Ideally the character would appear on the screen at
      the same time as the click; not after, and not before. If a
      keyboard can 'cheat' and activate the switch before that and
      hide some latency, that's fine by me.
 
        dom0 - 1 hours ago
        Seasoned gamers preload keys they are anticipating to use.
        On my keyboard I have less than a millimeter of travel from
        the preloaded point I use (which is right in front of the
        tactile bump and is quickly trained) to actuation.In
        tacticale switches the bump and the making of the contact
        are mechanically connected.Using the moment of finger/key
        contact quite obviously selects for travel, among other
        things.
 
          jetpacktuxedo - 16 minutes ago
          >In tacticale switches the bump and the making of the
          contact are mechanically connected.Nope! This is rarely
          (if ever?) the case. In alps switches, for example, there
          are two totally separate leafs, one of which handles the
          tactile feeling and the other of which is responsible for
          the actual actuation. If you browse through Haata's
          Plotly[1] you can see that many switches actuate well
          after the tactile bump. Though they are often pretty
          closely related in terms of their depth in the keypress,
          they are wholly unrelated from one another
          mechanically.[1] https://plot.ly/~haata
 
      sundvor - 1 hours ago
      If you game on a mechanical keyboard, you've pretty much
      worked out exactly where the switch points are and will be
      working the keys in a fashion different to normal typing. So
      I'm not quite buying the way the measurements were made vs
      the purpose of the tests.
 
        Splines - 23 minutes ago
        Do you really press every possible key down almost to the
        switch point, and then when you want to actuate the key,
        press it a tiny bit further?I would guess (and maybe I'm
        wrong about this) that you rest your fingers on the
        keycaps, and press them in as far as needed to actuate, but
        no further.  The key still needs to travel.
 
matthavener - 2 hours ago
PS/2 keyboards are used by serious gamers because the scan rate is
higher than USB.See https://superuser.com/questions/16893/do-usb-
or-ps-2-keyboar...
 
  theandrewbailey - 2 hours ago
  Saying that PS/2 boards are "scanned" is inaccurate, as they
  trigger an interrupt immediately on a keypress.
 
    rubatuga - 2 hours ago
    Doesn?t the micro controller in the keyboard still scan, and
    then send a ps/2 signal?
 
      valarauca1 - 1 hours ago
      Most mechanical PS2 keyboards are a diode cascade.You
      pressing the key triggers a wave of electricity cross the
      keyboard which is converted into the PS2 waveform, and pumped
      out at the same rate of the incoming clock waveform.OLD PS2
      keyboards don't generally have internal digital micro-
      controllers, they're effectively analog, the logic they do
      contain is blindly simple. This is why some struggle with
      N-Key Rollover.---OFC this is if you are using an -old- PS2
      keyboard. I'm still using an 80's IBM Model M and above it
      roughly how it works.
 
        kmill - 20 minutes ago
        I am having a very difficult time believing this.- I cannot
        find about "diode cascades" having anything to do
        keyboards.  The closest is the usual diode matrix to deal
        with simultaneous key presses.- The PS/2 interface involves
        sending scan codes, parity bits, and start and stop bits.
        How exactly does a "wave of electricity" get converted into
        a PS/2 waveform without some digital electronics?- All the
        old schematics for mechanical keyboards I could find were
        the usual matrix scan.  Even a textbook from the
        1970s.Anyway, reference please.  I'd find it very
        interesting to see how such a thing would work.
 
        duskwuff - 7 minutes ago
        This is absolutely untrue for any PS/2 keyboard, as well as
        for most pre-PS/2 PC keyboards (incuding AT and XT
        keyboards). All keyboards have always had a microcontroller
        in them which is responsible for scanning the key matrix
        and sending output over the serial link. (In PS/2, it's
        also responsible for reading input to change the state of
        keyboard LEDs.) There is nothing analog about them
        whatsoever.Here is a set of pictures of an IBM Model M, for
        instance. The microcontroller is clearly visible in the
        ceramic DIP40 package.http://www.clickeykeyboards.com/model
        -m-gallery/1985-ibm-mod...
 
  HugoDaniel - 2 hours ago
  do serious gamers avoid v-sync ? even at 120Hz they get at least
  ~8ms * 2(double buffer) latency right ?
 
    dsr_ - 2 hours ago
    Yes, they want freesync or g-sync monitors with high refresh
    rates.
 
      a_t48 - 1 hours ago
      Or a good enough machine so that you never dip below native
      framerate.
 
        sgarman - 57 minutes ago
        Even so you would never use vsync as it will introduce
        input lag in most gaming engines.
 
          sgtmas2006 - 21 minutes ago
          Most competitive players will have their own configs for
          competitive play etc. I have tournament/LAN configs,
          online play configs, and my video settings mostly stay
          the same. All tuned for lowest latency and highest
          visibility.
 
  gsich - 1 hours ago
  Isn't PS/2 interrupt based? So there would be no scan rate.
  Haven't looked at your link though.
 
    dfox - 29 minutes ago
    There are two "scan" rates: the rate at whitch keyboard matrix
    is scanned by whatever electronics is inside keyboard (that is
    probably independent of the outside interface) and the rate at
    which the interface is able to process input events, which for
    PS/2 means faster that the keyboard can produce them (as
    keyboard is essentially bus master on the AT/PS2 keyboard
    "bus") and for USB means as fast as the *HCI pools keyboard for
    interrupt events (old Apple's ADB works the same way and is in
    fact to some extent inspiration for USB <3.0 and Firewire "one
    big bus" high level model).Edit: then there is third approach:
    simple keyboard/input devices with serial interfaces, where
    host provided clock is used to both clock the interface and
    keyboard scan logic. In essence the whole keyboard then looks
    like one big shift register. Keyboards that works this way
    includes original Macintosh, most Wyse and DEC terminals and
    MIT/LMI/Symbolics Lisp machines (and probably pre-sun4 Suns,
    sun4 and later have rs232-derived ionterface), also this is the
    way how controllers for Nintendo consoles before Wii work (IIRC
    Nintendo calls that "EXI bus") and how PlayStation 1/2
    controllers work. IMHO this is to some extent where the idea
    behind SPI comes from.
 
  yathern - 2 hours ago
  For what it's worth, that answer is now 8 years old - I'm curious
  if this has changed since then.
 
    revelation - 2 hours ago
    I've gotten a FTDI down to 2 ms RTT, so if done right (using
    isochronous transfer) you can get USB down to 1 or max 2 ms.
    Looking at the latencies quoted here and in the article it's
    certainly not the problem.Notice that just getting a thread
    scheduled every 2 ms is already impossible for Windows,
    certainly one running a game. You'll get a bunch of outliers
    within the second. So even if you got your keyboard down to 5
    ms, great, but you are not running an operating system that can
    reliably do something within that timespan!
 
      eertami - 1 hours ago
      >So even if you got your keyboard down to 5 ms, great, but
      you are not running an operating system that can reliably do
      something within that timespan!Maybe I'm not understanding,
      but that doesn't seem correct.Most people (gamers) are
      running mice at 500/1000Hz polling rates and you can easily
      verify the movement made in each 1-2ms update. (And it is
      most definitely a noticeable difference going from a standard
      125Hz rate to even 500Hz.)
 
        ssfrr - 1 hours ago
        Don't confuse throughout and latency. The mouse may be
        measuring and sending data every 1-2ms, but that doesn't
        say anything about the latency before the data is handled.
 
          munchbunny - 15 minutes ago
          This is also a pretty important point: most monitors
          refresh at 60hz anyway even if your game seems to be
          measuring much higher framerates, so there's a worst case
          floor of ~17s on just visuals lagging behind input
          because you're waiting for the next screen refresh
          anyway.The mouse measuring data every 1-2ms will increase
          the quality of the motion tracking, but it won't
          necessarily help you with latency unless the data gets to
          the game fast and the game handles the data quickly.This
          explanation by John Carmack comes to mind... it's a good
          reminder against a lot of the hardware fetishism that is
          mixed into otherwise good advice about gaming setups.
          https://superuser.com/questions/419070/transatlantic-
          ping-fa...
 
    SebiH - 2 hours ago
    A more recent video claims that the PS/2 advantages are
    negligible even for serious gamers (around 3:40)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWkvzycD5PE
 
      ghusbands - 1 hours ago
      The message therein directly states that latency isn't
      noticeable for those keyboards and hence, according to the
      article, is simply uninformed.
 
  sp332 - 1 hours ago
  The PS/2 protocol is incredibly slow. Just sending two bytes over
  the wire via PS/2 takes 1.3 ms.
 
    [deleted]
 
rbanffy - 2 hours ago
On the debouncing thing, Razer announced one with optical switches
instead of electrical.
 
  enthdegree - 1 hours ago
  Yep, also capacitive and Hall-effect switches don't need
  debouncing.
 
gsich - 1 hours ago
Here is a video where someone is testing USB latency, although with
USB hubs:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbu3ySrRNVc
 
sgt - 1 hours ago
Has anyone benchmarked the keyboard latency of recent generations
MacBook Pro Retinas?
 
  M4v3R - 1 hours ago
  I don't have a way to measure raw USB events, but it takes around
  90 ms between me pressing a key on the Macbook's (2015 model)
  keyboard and a character showing in the TextEdit.app.
 
    skykooler - 13 minutes ago
    Some of that is surely in the OS and display however. I wonder
    how you'd go about measuring the latency of a laptop keyboard?
 
lolc - 1 hours ago
By coincidence I just replaced my last Apple Keyboard with an MS
4000 today. I find it curious that they are both at the top of the
list, even though I've never considered hardware latency an issue.
 
[deleted]