GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-16) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
ESO Telescopes Observe First Light from Gravitational Wave Source
474 points by acqq
https://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1733/
___________________________________________________________________
 
azizsaya - 7 hours ago
NPR article does a good job of simplifying this, I hope it is
technically correct!http://thin.npr.org/s.php?sId=557557544
 
runeb - 6 hours ago
After observers found the source of the collision the scientist at
the Chile observatory claims to have spent 45 minutes to locate it
in the sky. Do they not have some sort of coordinate system they
could use to pinpoint it?
 
  scentoni - 6 hours ago
  The resolution of our present gravitational wave observations is
  very low. Adding VIRGO to LIGO helps reduce the area of the sky
  to look in.
 
acqq - 4 hours ago
The main paper about the detections:http://iopscience.iop.org/artic
le/10.3847/2041-8213/aa91c9"Multi-messenger Observations of a
Binary Neutron Star Merger"published in The Astrophysical Journal L
etters.PDF:http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/aa91
c9/p...ePub:http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/aa9
1c9/e..."Some researchers say it has 4600 authors," I haven't
counted myself.
 
knice - 8 hours ago
A team from UC Santa Cruz used the data from the Swope telescope in
Chile to locate the source of the gravitation waves and observe the
light from the event. The data provides evidence of how gold and
other heavy elements formed in the
universe.http://reports.news.ucsc.edu/neutron-star-
merger/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5EkI5qbYYcFull disclosure:
I work at UC Santa Cruz and built the site linked above. :-)
 
  Balgair - 5 hours ago
  Go Slugs!
 
  espadrine - 7 hours ago
  Congrats!How do you automate screening the sky?Do you have robots
  that map stars, diff the images, and send an email when the diff
  has a new spot of light?How frequently does the sky get fully
  screened? Could there be events fast enough that we don't detect
  them?
 
    knice - 2 minutes ago
    This paper by one of the team members has more detail about the
    process used to narrow down the search field to a list of
    galaxies and identify possible locations of the event:
    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2017/10/13/scien...
 
    semaphoreP - 4 hours ago
    Not involved in this, I'm guessing this is how it goes: there
    are algorithms that automatically register the image that was
    just taken, diff it with a reference image of the sky from
    before, and if there's a significant difference that passes
    some false positive tests, then there's some notification for
    human intervention.Indeed there could be events we are missing
    right now. Astronomers are building instruments that have
    larger fields of view (e.g., LSST), so that they can scan the
    sky ever few days.
 
    knice - 5 hours ago
    Apologies, I'm not one of the researchers involved in the
    discovery. I'm just the web developer who built the
    announcement site for UCSC. Ryan Foley will participate in a
    Reddit AMA tomorrow (Tuesday, 10/17). I imagine your questions
    might get answered there.
 
  andreasklinger - 7 hours ago
  Sidenote: Amazing how international the collaboration in this
  industry is. Kudos to you people
 
    zyngaro - 5 hours ago
    Smart people have a tendency to cooperation and collaboration.
 
      mortenjorck - 5 hours ago
      That's a nice feel-good position to express, but is there any
      empirical evidence for it? There are plenty of very smart
      people (in academia) who are narcissistic, paranoid of
      potential rivals, and generally the opposite of cooperative
      and collaborative.
 
        macintux - 5 hours ago
        It might be more of a question of field. Based on my
        hopelessly incomplete view from the outside, in cosmology
        and closely-related subjects, it's impossible to work
        independently and accomplish much of anything. You need
        observations from many different sources.
 
        zyngaro - 4 hours ago
        Narcissistic, paranoid are not traits what I call smart
        people. Humility on the other hand is. I guess studying and
        observing the universe makes people humble. The great
        physicians Einstein, Bohr and co of the beginning of 20
        century worked together a lot for example. But anyway
        according the first fundamental of human stupidity there is
        fixed ratio of stupid poeple in any group of people. I
        think we can agree those you are referring to can be called
        stupid.
 
          bdamm - 3 hours ago
          It's a relief to see that raw IQ is no longer the widely
          accepted standard for "smart".
 
          pellucide - 2 hours ago
          There is an indian saying which translates to... A tree
          full of fruits stays closer to the ground than one
          without.
 
    azernik - 2 hours ago
    It's a field in which international collaboration is forced -
    no amount of intelligence or money will let a nothern-
    hemisphere observatory get a shot of southern-hemisphere stars,
    for example.
 
  dnautics - 3 hours ago
  isn't it generally accepted that gold and other heavy elements
  are formed in supernovae?
 
smortaz - 3 hours ago
Relevant: if you want run their actual code via your browser, check
out their jupyter notebooks:https://notebooks.azure.com/roywilliams
/libraries/LIGOOpenSc...Click View to read or Clone to make your
own copy and run.
 
johnvega - 3 hours ago
This stuff makes Elon Musk's plan to colonize Mars relatively less
exciting.
 
zitterbewegung - 8 hours ago
This is awesome! We should be able to find more gravitational wave
sources and it will give us a better picture of the cosmos. Also,
that we have more sources with better correlation and more
information.
 
  cryptonector - 7 hours ago
  The best part is that gravitational waves stand out in a way that
  events in the visible spectrum do not, so these gravitational
  wave observatories will be helping find events and get them
  observed in every portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that we
  can observe.  That means we'll be observing many more of these
  kilonovae now.  This truly is a new era, as we'll now be able to
  use all these observatories at the same time to observe the same
  events, and this will yield the highest possible resolution
  imaging of these events, as far-flung telescopes are able to
  function as one really, really big, virtual one.
 
    mark-r - 7 hours ago
    How often are these kilonovae expected to occur?
 
quickthrower2 - 6 hours ago
Was about to submit https://qz.com/1102917/observing-the-merger-of-
neutron-stars...
 
zymhan - 7 hours ago
The Gravitational wave was detected 2 seconds before the Gamma Ray
Burst. I wonder why it is faster?> On 17 August 2017 the NSF's
Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in the
United States, working with the Virgo Interferometer in Italy,
detected gravitational waves passing the Earth. This event, the
fifth ever detected, was named GW170817. About two seconds later,
two space observatories, NASA?s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and
ESA?s INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL),
detected a short gamma-ray burst from the same area of the sky.
 
  jcwayne - 6 hours ago
  I would assume it's for a similar reason to why neutrinos from a
  supernova arrive before the photons. Photons won't be traveling
  at the speed of light (in a vacuum) until the're actually in a
  vacuum. Neutrinos and the propagation of gravitational waves
  wouldn't be slowed down as much by the matter between the center
  of the event and open space.
 
  contravariant - 7 hours ago
  I suppose it would be weirder if the gamma rays arrived first.
 
  [deleted]
 
  oppositelock - 7 hours ago
  Is it faster, or did the gravitational waves simply precede the
  GRB?
 
    valarauca1 - 5 hours ago
    You are correct. Waves come from the final in spiral, before
    the black hole forms.The GRB is from the rapid in fall, and
    friction of neutron star matter falling into the black hole.
 
  31reasons - 7 hours ago
  I wonder if the gravitation waves stretches the Space-time in
  such a way that it takes 2 seconds longer for the photons of GRB
  to travel "on top of it" and reach earth.
 
  WhoBeI - 5 hours ago
  My guess would be resolution. Gravitational waves are not only
  caused by the actual merger but also from the two masses losing
  energy while spinning closer and closer to each other. The GRB
  happens when they finally merge.
 
  delibes - 7 hours ago
  That's the fun science bit where we say "Oh that's odd" :)Is
  there some matter along the path that interacts with the gamma
  ray burst and slows it by two seconds? Why is it two seconds?
  Does it tell us something about the source?All very exciting.
 
    sdenton4 - 5 hours ago
    Yeah my first thought was that space isn't quite a vacuum,
    which maybe adds up over 130M light years to something
    measurable. Meanwhile, the gravitational wave is a fluctuation
    in space itself, so always moves at SoL?The sibling comment
    about one simply happening after another also seems very
    plausible though.
 
  baq - 7 hours ago
  IANAAstronomer but my a-little-bit educated guess is gravity
  waves are emited during the "very close dance" phase of the
  merger and the GRB is the explosion that happens right after
  that.
 
  empath75 - 7 hours ago
  I think the simplest explanation is that the gamma ray burst
  takes 2 seconds to form after the gravitational event.
 
  davidhyde - 6 hours ago
  The gravitational waves here were measured for about 100 seconds
  (as opposed to the much shorter 'chirp' from the first
  gravitational wave detection made in 2016) so the whole event
  took some time to unfold.The 2 second delay was due to the fact
  that gamma rays were generated by matter slowing down after it
  was ejected from the system and which collided with galactic gas.
  That matter was ejected from the black hole's axis of rotation
  and the black hole formed some time after the gravity waves were
  detected.Take a look at this article: http://physicsworld.com/cws
  /article/news/2017/oct/16/spectac..."As this material was sucked
  into the black hole, a fast-moving jet of material blasted
  outward along the black hole's axis of rotation. When this jet
  collided with gas in the galaxy, it started slowing down and the
  lost kinetic energy was broadcast as gamma rays"
 
  rosstex - 7 hours ago
  The gravity waves are caused by the high-speed orbiting of the
  neutron stars around each other before the explosive collision
  and merger.
 
  ww520 - 2 hours ago
  Gravitational wave is caused by the abrupt change of movement of
  massive object through spacetime.  I would imagine the two
  neutron stars are traveling to each other in way slower speed
  than the speed of light.  When the edges of the two neutron stars
  first touched, their movement was abruptly stopped and the
  gravitational wave propagated out.  The light only went out after
  the merging of the two objects, the compression, and the ignition
  of the kilonova, which took some time.
 
platz - 5 hours ago
So, was there a telescope monitoring the light location already, or
was the light only found after the Gr detection... I.e. Was it not
truly concurrent?
 
  nerfhammer - 4 hours ago
  they swung the telescopes around to look for it shortly after the
  detection event
 
cromwellian - 6 hours ago
Veritasium summary is one of the best easily digestable I've
seen.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAyk2OsKvtU
 
  acqq - 5 hours ago
  I like much more this one by the Science
  Magazine:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_uIOKfv710and this one
  by The Georgia Institute of
  Technology:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLivjAoDrTg
 
    spuz - 2 hours ago
    I disagree, the Veritasium video has way more information than
    the two videos you linked. It shows how the gamma ray
    telescopes and gravitational wave detectors worked together to
    narrow the source in the sky of event. What a gravitational
    wave signal looks like, what a gamma ray signal looks like. The
    fact that the optical signal was made 11 hours after that. Etc.
    There is a lot more info on top of that which makes the video
    worth watching.
 
      cromwellian - 2 hours ago
      Yes, the fact that the negative detection by Virgo was
      actually significant was interesting.
 
      acqq - 1 hours ago
      It probably reflects my personal tastes, and I apologize for
      that in advance, as I understand he's a kind a Youtube star
      or something, but I find the Veritasium presenter too
      attention-grabbing distracting, so much that I can't even
      concentrate to what he is talking about. There is no visible
      presenter in the Science Mag video, ad I like that, and there
      is another presenter appearing in the Georgia Tech video
      (Laura Cadonati, a professor), but there I definitely don't
      have that "WTH the presenter is demanding more attention than
      the topic" effect, even if she has an accent.I surely in this
      case react just like a "mom" from this comment: "Showed this
      video with amazing science discoveries about the universe to
      my mom and all she said was : "this guy likes orange
      decorations"?." I also just see the guy, his appearance, his
      body movements and his room decorations etc and I just have
      this "look at me" impression. I can imagine that helps his
      personal popularity on that medium, and I guess he optimizes
      for that, but it obscures the actual content, at least to
      me.So I don't have energy to analyze it further, but I have
      had an impression that the videos I've suggested contain some
      information that doesn't exist in the Veritasium's video, and
      that the level of the information is better suited for those
      who need short summary. Maybe there is a target group which,
      like I, better responds to the videos I've suggested.For
      those who are really interested in the details, I think
      there's no substitute to reading the main scientific paper,
      written by 4600 people(!):http://iopscience.iop.org/article/1
      0.3847/2041-8213/aa91c9It is much more accessible than you'd
      imagine, it starts with:"Over 80 years ago Baade & Zwicky
      (1934) proposed the idea of neutron stars, and soon after,
      Oppenheimer & Volkoff (1939) carried out the first
      calculations of neutron star models..."(Yes, it's "the"
      Oppenheimer, who later go to be called "the father of the
      atomic bomb." Fritz Zwicky was apparently "the first
      astronomer to propose the existence of dark matter,
      supernovas, neutron stars, galactic cosmic rays,
      gravitational lensing by galaxies, and galaxy
      clusters.")Reading the original sources further, the first
      map of the potential area on the sky and the first trigger
      that set everything in motion is:"On 2017 August 17 12:41:06
      UTC the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM; Meegan et al.
      2009) onboard flight software triggered on, classified, and
      localized a GRB." My understanding is that it was never
      actually necessary for Virgo to reject the second (lower)
      area on this image:http://www.virgo-
      gw.eu/images/GW170817.pngbut it can be that its operation
      helped narrowing down the upper area. That's why I don't like
      the interpretation in the video mentioned.
 
gigatexal - 6 hours ago
As a fan of the Astro-sciences I am so glad to be alive. I have all
the confidence that within my lifetime hopefully (next 50 years
hopefully) we will see great things maybe even a unification
relativity and quantum mechanics.
 
seomint - 6 hours ago
Non-scientist here, is this a Nobel Prize caliber discovery? Just
trying to get some perspective here. It sounds exciting.
 
  ISL - 4 hours ago
  Yes.
 
  scentoni - 6 hours ago
  Basically they've made the first direct observations of what
  causes a https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma-ray_burstI expect
  there will be a Nobel, not immediately but after years of
  accumulating statistics on many different GRBs.
 
  raverbashing - 5 hours ago
  You mean like this?
  https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/20...
 
  semaphoreP - 4 hours ago
  Quite possibly I think. This is both confirmation that neutron
  star mergers do indeed exist and create kilonova, and the first
  detection of an astronomical event with both gravitational waves
  and light. Nobel prize is only limited to three people though, so
  it's unclear who they would give it to, given there are thousands
  of people that contributed to this.
 
bd - 8 hours ago
Here is LIGO live
stream:https://www.youtube.com/user/VideosatNSF/liveThis was LIGO
(US) + Virgo (EU) + 70 ground- and space-based observatories
collaboration:http://www.ligo.org/http://www.virgo-gw.eu/
 
apetresc - 8 hours ago
It appears this was the discovery, they're talking about it on
stream now: http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1733/ (ESO Telescopes
Observe First Light from Gravitational Wave Source)The stream is
at: http://www.eso.org/public/ It's currently being explained right
now.
 
  1001101 - 8 hours ago
  Taking a while to load.  The summary suggests that GRBs are
  caused by neutron star mergers:"ESO?s fleet of telescopes in
  Chile have detected the first visible counterpart to a
  gravitational wave source. These historic observations suggest
  that this unique object is the result of the merger of two
  neutron stars. The cataclysmic aftermaths of this kind of merger
  ? long-predicted events called kilonovae ? disperse heavy
  elements such as gold and platinum throughout the Universe. This
  discovery, published in several papers in the journal Nature and
  elsewhere, also provides the strongest evidence yet that short-
  duration gamma-ray bursts are caused by mergers of neutron
  stars."
 
epberry - 5 hours ago
This is so cool because we used our ears (the LIGO detectors) to
hear/feel the gravitational wave hit then used our eyes
(electromagnetic radiation telescopes) to focus in on where we
thought we felt the ripple. And what's more, machines all over the
planet were involved. Just awe-inspiring.
 
  zyngaro - 5 hours ago
  Wonderfully summed up. Thank you. By the way I thought
  gravitational waves have only been a theory. How can they be
  detected and is there such a thing as a gravitational quantum ?
 
    space_fountain - 5 hours ago
    It's worth mentioning that there is a very common confusion
    around what is meant by a theory. It isn't the same as a guess.
    It has to be well supported. We've had good reason to think
    gravitational waves existed based on the well supported math of
    gravity.Last year we got the first expirmental confirmation of
    this.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_theory
 
      zyngaro - 4 hours ago
      Theory as is not confirmed by any observation yet! Why the
      downvote ?
 
        acqq - 4 hours ago
        The first indirect observational confirmation of the
        gravitational waves was published in 1982, that is, 35
        years
        ago:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982ApJ...253..908TBut
        the work on the gravitational wave detectors started much
        earlier, some fundamental calculations to support the
        current project were made already in the 1967, 50 years
        ago! That scientist (Rainer Weiss) got a half of the Nobel
        Prize in Physics this year for that:https://www.nobelprize.
        org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/20...Richard Feynman
        contributed his (valid) argument in support of the energy
        actually carried by the gravitational waves at the first
        American conference on general relativity, GR1, in 1957, 60
        years ago:https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017
        /03/07/how-...Regarding the false understanding of the term
        "scientific theory" by the non-scientific public:"A
        scientific theory is an explanation of some aspect of the
        natural world that has been substantiated through repeated
        experiments or testing [emphasis mine]. But to the average
        Jane or Joe, a theory is [wrongly] just an idea that lives
        in someone's head, rather than an explanation rooted in
        experiment and testing [the actual scientific meaning]."htt
        ps://www.scientificamerican.com/article/just-a-theory-7-m..
        .The gravitation is also "a scientific theory."The
        gravitational waves are the consequence of the General
        Relativity, the theory introduced in 1915 by Einstein (102
        years ago), but which was also based on the centuries of
        the previous observations and calculations i.e. all the
        discoveries of the gravitation (Newton 1687, 330 years
        ago), electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves (more
        than 200 years ago), etc."Though these words [like
        "theory"] may be routinely misunderstood, the real problem,
        scientists say, is that people don't get rigorous science
        education in middle school and high school. As a result,
        the public doesn't understand how scientific explanations
        are formed, tested and accepted."That I have to write all
        this is a kind of confirmation of that statement.Just the
        same, the science of global warming is also based on the
        scientific observations and valid theories since 1824
        (almost 200 years ago):https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor
        y_of_climate_change_scie...
 
          swift - 2 hours ago
          People misunderstand this stuff in part because of the
          failure to make a distinction between a theory (which is
          often a mathematical description of a system, though this
          depends on the discipline) and an interpretation (which
          really is an idea in someone?s head, though often one we
          have good reason to believe). Scientists mostly work with
          the former day-to-day, but the general public is mostly
          interested in the latter.Usually this distinction isn?t
          really a big deal, but in some cases - quantum mechanics,
          for example - there?s a big difference between the two,
          with multiple interesting interpretations to
          consider.When we don?t make this distinction it creates
          an opening for people with poor understanding (or,
          occasionally, bad motives) to nitpick extremely well-
          established theories on the basis of quibbling about
          interpretation. I worry about this with respect to
          climate change specifically: deniers come up with a
          million reasons that climate change may be partially
          natural, or that this or that industry may be unfairly
          maligned, but we can?t get sucked into those debates so
          much that we forget the big picture painted by the data
          and models we have.
 
    semi-extrinsic - 4 hours ago
    These are completely classical waves, exactly like a pressure
    wave from a detonation, expanding in a sphere outwards from a
    neutron star merger. While a pressure wave is a rapidly moving
    but small change in gas density, a gravitational wave is a
    veery rapidly moving but veeery small change in the "density"
    of spacetime itself.These gravitational waves are predicted by
    (completely non-quantum) general relativity. Einstein predicted
    their existence in 1916, but thought we would never have good
    enough detectors to measure them.
 
      komali2 - 4 hours ago
      These waves travel at the speed of light, right? How is light
      itself affected by gravitational waves? I guess also changed,
      if they're using lasers to detect them, yea?
 
        semi-extrinsic - 4 hours ago
        The waves do travel at the speed of light, since that's the
        upper speed limit in GR.The light is affected only because
        the distance it has to travel changes when spacetime
        compresses and expands. So the time it takes from A to B
        changes, but also the wavelength of the light.What is used
        in Ligo etc. is interference. They shoot two perpendicular
        laser beams that collide in a point. Ordinarily, the lasers
        interfere at this point and everything is aligned so they
        cancel each other out almost perfectly. But when a
        gravitational wave changes the length in one of the arms,
        the interference isn't perfect anymore and you can detect
        the laser signal.To a very very good approximation, a
        gravitational wave front hitting Earth is a flat plane.
        This means the detectors cannot see waves that hit the arms
        at close to 45?, as well as waves that hit the Earth's
        surface close to vertically at the detector location.
 
          komali2 - 4 hours ago
          Jesus, I can't imagine the type of resolution necessary
          to make those detectors work!So the indication that
          "gravity wave happened" is wavelength change? Freaky
          stuff, I really have a hard time wrapping my head around
          all this, even after reading layman intros.
 
          semi-extrinsic - 2 hours ago
          No, it's not wavelength change, it's the number of
          wavelengths that fit in each "arm" of the detector. With
          4 km arms and 1000 nanometer laser wavelength (actual
          numbers), you will have 4 000 000 000.00 wavelengths that
          fit in each arm. When a gravitational wave passes, one
          arm will have 4 000 000 000.10 wavelengths and the other
          is unchanges. Since we're working with interference, this
          parts-per-billion change is converted into a large change
          in light.Mechanical analogy: there are two very long very
          fine pitch helical gears that are both suspended from one
          end and mesh perfectly at the other end. When the
          gravitational wave makes one gear undetectably longer, we
          can easily see that the gears no longer mesh.
 
          komali2 - 1 hours ago
          Oh my god they're 4km long, dude this is awesome. Cheers
          for the analogy and explanation.
 
        SomeStupidPoint - 1 hours ago
        These kind of waves do, but not all gravitational waves do.
        (You can think of the class these are as "normal", smooth
        waves.)Sufficiently "foamy" ones should act like waves
        passing through material and cause interference based
        losses while sufficiently strange waves will travel faster
        than light, a la the hypothetical warp drive using negative
        mass.
 
    epberry - 5 hours ago
    I don't know about the quantums but to detect the waves you
    basically split a laser beam using mirrors and redirect each
    split to a detector. When the wave hits it stretches each split
    in the beam slightly which causes an interference pattern. That
    pattern, as it evolves over time as the wave hits, can be
    converted into sound which is that "chirp" that everyone talks
    about.
 
    jasonwatkinspdx - 5 hours ago
    Gravitational wave detectors like LIGO
    (https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/what-is-ligo) are very
    precise laser range finders used as rulers. They can measure
    extremely small expansions and contractions of space
    itself.Discovering a quantized theory of gravity is possibly
    _the_ major open question in physics atm. We presume there's a
    'graviton' of some sort, but have not observed it yet.
 
      peeters - 4 hours ago
      If I'm remembering the analogy in the livestream correctly,
      if you applied the laser's precision to astronomical scales,
      it would be the equivalent of measuring the distance to the
      moon with a tolerance the width of a human hair.  And in the
      scales they deal with, a tolerance one-tenth the diameter of
      a proton.
 
netcraft - 8 hours ago
awesome discovery.  Can't wait to see the pictures.  So much closer
than the other detections of black holes - I assume the detection
range of neutron starts is much smaller.
 
  guelo - 8 hours ago
  Yes. It mentions that in note 4 here
  https://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1733/
 
Boothroid - 4 hours ago
Am I the only one that's a bit men about this given the pre-
conference hyperbole? I was expecting aliens :(
 
[deleted]
 
sandworm101 - 8 hours ago
Cool, but i want more.  All we have so far is confirmations of
rather well-understood interactions.  I want "we see these massive
waves, but have no idea what is causing them."  If they are being
seen, such results aren't published.
 
  dspillett - 7 hours ago
  > All we have so far is confirmations of rather well-understood
  interactions.Confirmations of commonly assumed interactions. This
  is vital, as numbers of other hypothesise/theories/other rely on
  that understanding. Without results like these all that work is
  on shaky ground, now it looks far more solid.Confirming current
  understanding isn't as sexy as discovering new physics, but just
  as important, possibly more so.
 
    sandworm101 - 7 hours ago
    That depends.  I'd bet money that LIGO was not pitched on the
    idea that it would only confirm the existence of waves.  New
    instruments are pitched on the expectation of novel
    measurements. the "new physics".  The parallels to the LHC and
    other massively-expensive instruments are striking.  They
    confirm something that has already been widely accepted,
    generate the expected prize and raft of phds, but when it is
    all over the universe hasn't changed.  I worry that those
    greenlighting these projects are being too conservative, only
    investing in projects that have clear pathways.  This trend
    matters.  Physics needs these giant instruments to generate
    something truly new otherwise the billions will drift towards
    other disciplines.
 
      scentoni - 6 hours ago
      You're misunderstanding the purpose of LIGO. LIGO is partly a
      physics experiment to confirm general relativity, like
      Gravity Probe B, but mostly an astronomical observatory. All
      astronomy before was based on electromagnetic waves (light,
      then radio, UV, IR, Xray, gamma). This is a completely
      separate information source about the behavior of stars and
      will have a huge impact on astrophysics.
 
      acqq - 6 hours ago
      You are wrong. The LHC was absolutely prepared to observe new
      "unexpected" (for the "Standard model") particles. It just
      didn't happen. A lot of theorists who had developed the
      theoretical extensions of the "Standard model" are
      disappointed about that, but that's what is
      observed.Regarding the gravitational waves, you're also
      wrong, as the theory and the observations matched even
      without the gravitational waves being directly observed, the
      science is simply so good that completely unexpected results
      (in the sense you talk) are outside of the resulting limits
      of the previous measurements and calculations.The level of
      the science we have now is really stunning. The only sad part
      of the story is that all investments in the science are
      really minute compared to all the money spent on armies and
      weapons (e.g. just as the order of magnitude one year of the
      US military budget is at least 30 times bigger than the
      NASA's).There's immense amount of the new information that
      can be obtained by the repeated observations. But the
      expectation of anything to disprove too much of what we know
      up to now is simply not realistic.
 
        sandworm101 - 5 hours ago
        LIGO is a new telescope.  Everyone is hoping that, like
        every other form of telescope ever built, it will 'see'
        things that we didn't know were out there.  There are lists
        of unexplained phenomena that telescopes see very
        regularly.  Trying to explain such observations is the
        forefront of astronomy and physics (see dark
        matter/energy).  But this telescope has yet to add to the l
        ists.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_unsolved_problem
        s_in_p...
 
          acqq - 2 hours ago
          This is a huge observation, and many more insights are to
          come, and that this one or the previous three didn't add
          to that list you'd wish to be added to doesn't in any way
          diminish the achievement.
 
  kkylin - 4 hours ago
  LIGO may or may not turn up "new physics," but I for one think
  it's already plenty exciting to (i) confirm the predictions of GR
  (not a given), and (ii) be able to "see" the state of the
  universe through this new instrument -- there's more to
  (astro)physics than just the relevant physical laws.
 
WD-42 - 6 hours ago
If any of you are interested in some of the software that made this
discovery possible, check out two of the papers from Las Cumbres Ob
servatory:http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/n
atu...http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/aa910f/m.
..We run a network of 20 telescopes that are triggered remotely
(mostly via API). Because of our ability to schedule observations
quickly, we were the only ones able to observe the peak luminosity
of the kilonova.Disclosure: I am a software engineer at LCO.
 
  Ductapemaster - 3 hours ago
  Thanks for your work!  I live in Santa Barbara and love the
  Astronomy On Tap events you guys put together.  It's very cool
  what you have enabled astronomers across the world to do, and
  it's even better that you give back to the community and get
  people excited about space.  Keep it up!
 
    WD-42 - 3 hours ago
    Thanks for the kind words! See you at the next AOT.
 
  mads - 3 hours ago
  How did you get this job?I studied astrophysics, but I mainly try
  to lure people into clicking on ads these days, when I am not
  doing consulting.
 
    fusiongyro - 36 minutes ago
    I work for the NRAO and concur with WD-42: there are more
    positions than software developers. The main problem is finding
    people who can withstand our sadistic hiring process and then
    not laugh when we tell them the salary and where you will live.
    :)
 
    WD-42 - 3 hours ago
    Random internet browsing! I have a previous interest in
    astronomy and I stumbled upon our website, which had a jobs
    page. They were looking for someone with Django experience.The
    field has an increasingly large demand for people with software
    engineering experience due to the complexity of modern
    observatories, instrumentation and data analysis. It's only
    going to grow from here. The problem is competing with SV,
    which tends to be a black hole for talented software engineers.
 
      [deleted]
 
      chrshawkes - 1 hours ago
      what is SV?
 
        blueish - 1 hours ago
        Silicon Valley
        (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon_Valley)
 
  spuz - 6 hours ago
  Given that GRBs have been detected for a long time and thought to
  have been a result of neutron star mergers, has a GRB detection
  ever led to an optical light detection of such a merger before?
  Is the news here that gravitational wave detection allowed us to
  see neutron star mergers optically or that they simply coincided
  with detections of the previously seen optical and gamma ray
  events?
 
    scrumper - 5 hours ago
    Yes, in around 1997 I believe.http://www.nature.com/nature/jour
    nal/v396/n6708/full/396233a...My read is that the news here is
    that this is the first visual counterpart to a gravitational
    wave detection. (It's also very strong supporting evidence for
    the leading theory that neutron stars merging are sources of
    those gravitational waves.)
 
    WD-42 - 5 hours ago
    Yes, there have been optical counterparts to GRBs before. What
    is news here is the first optical counterpart to a
    gravitational wave detection, along with a GRB, which gives us
    the strongest evidence yet that these are neutron star mergers.
 
      spuz - 5 hours ago
      Is there any new information gained from the optical
      observations in this particular instance? Did the initial
      gravitational wave detection allow us to capture the optical
      counterpart at an earlier stage than normal and therefore get
      more information as a result?
 
        WD-42 - 5 hours ago
        Yes, absolutely. This wasn't a very large gamma ray burst -
        as far as I know it may have not been followed up at all.
        GRBs are hard to localize - but the detection of the
        gravitational wave made it possible to search for the
        source quickly in a much smaller area of the sky. This got
        a lot of people looking, and a lot of good data collected.
 
hliyan - 6 hours ago
To put this in perspective:Since the first hominids looked up at
the stars, till literally yesterday, mankind had only one
fundamental force to observe the universe with: electromagnetic
waves, be it light, radio waves or infrared. From today, we have
two. The other two remaining fundamental forces do not operate at
astronomical scales.Of course, we had LIGO before yesterday, but
for me, the confirmation through electromagnetic wave observations
is key. This is an historic day!
 
  pvg - 5 hours ago
  We've detected neutrinos from the rest of the universe for some
  time.
 
  semaphoreP - 3 hours ago
  We've also been observing the universe using neutrinos (generated
  by the weak force). In fact, there have even been one neutrino
  event linked to a possible astrophysical source[1], but with less
  certainty than this gravitational wave/EM detection.[1]:
  https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasas-fermi-telesc...
 
    pvg - 3 hours ago
    Supernovae neutrinos have been detected for 30 years, it's not
    just one event.
 
czardoz - 8 hours ago
This seems to be the press release:
https://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1733/Edit: The main link points
here as well now.
 
  acqq - 8 hours ago
  This link here always pointed to the link you have given, you
  probably confused this post and another on the first
  page:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15483186That one is
  only an announcement of the press event, posted cca 7 minutes
  before the start of the event, not what was discovered, which was
  officially published exactly at the start of the hour, as the
  news conferences started.Anyway, at the moment there are still
  live streams,
  likehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtLPKYl4AHs10:00 am EDT -
  Press Conference (Part 1)11:00 am EDT - YouTube Q&A (ask us in
  the chat, we will answer on camera)11:15 am EDT - Press
  Conference (Part 2)12:30 am EDT - YouTube Q&A (Part 2)Also, in
  Europe (the European Southern Observatory), (edit: finished, now
  you can watch the recorded conference at the same
  link)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ISr4juIkDg )There's a nice
  1 minute
  animation:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nziW8fywwmgThere's also
  Reddit "AskScience AMA Series: European Southern Observatory
  announcement concerning groundbreaking observations" unlocked
  now, starting at 18:30 CEST / 12:30 ET:https://www.reddit.com/r/a
  skscience/comments/76ne3p/askscien...
 
SideburnsOfDoom - 8 hours ago
And do the gravitational waves propagate at the speed of light?
 
  fpoling - 8 hours ago
  For 130 million light years the difference between gravitational
  wave signal and gamma burst is 2s. That constrains the speed
  difference to 1.6e-18 m/s. This is fascinating number especially
  given that speed of light is 3e8.
 
    alok-g - 8 hours ago
    Newbie question:  While this is a very small fractional
    difference, could it be theoretically significant?  What is the
    explanation of this difference?  My best guess is that this
    difference must also be there in when the waves _started_.
 
      SideburnsOfDoom - 7 hours ago
      I'm not a physicist, but I did do the 101 course a long time
      ago. I read "That constrains the speed difference to 1.6e-18
      m/s" as "we measured as accurately as we could, and if they
      do differ, they must differ by this amount or less, which
      could just be the tolerances of our experiment"In other
      words, there's always a confidence interval, the trick is to
      measure it and minimise it: The speeds could be identical
      numbers, but what was measured was an either no or a very
      small difference. Larger differences have been ruled out.
      Identical numbers are _suggested_.
 
        alok-g - 6 hours ago
        What is observed is the delay between the two signals.
        Fractional speed difference is calculated from it.  As I
        understand, there is little chance that the 2 second delta
        isn't real.
 
      CamperBob2 - 2 hours ago
      Simplest explanation I can think of: there's no reason to
      model this event as if all of its energy is emitted from a
      point source.  As the NYT article put it, the size of the
      explosion is comparable to the orbit of Neptune.  Meanwhile,
      two seconds at the speed of light is less than the orbit of
      Earth's moon.So, if the gravitational effects originate from
      the center of mass of the explosion, and the gamma rays
      originate from some kind of Big Bang-like recombination
      phenomenon happening a few hundred million km away from the
      center of the expanding shell, that would easily account for
      the difference.
 
      fpoling - 7 hours ago
      As neutron stars are small, like 20 kilometers, while the
      light travels 600 000 km within 2 seconds and one can roughly
      assume that speed of processes that generates the gamma burst
      during the stars collisions matches the speed of light the
      delay may need some explanations. It could be just scattering
      of gamma rays by intergalactic medium that does not affect
      the gravitational waves, but what ever it is, I suppose it
      matches models or this delay will be in the news.
 
      pjungwir - 7 hours ago
      It reminds me of a point from non-Euclidean geometry. In
      Euclidean geometry a triangle has 180 degrees, but in
      hyperbolic or elliptic geometry it has more or less (I forget
      which way). So you could start measuring triangles to find
      out whether our universe is Euclidean or not. But since every
      measurement has an error interval, e.g. 180 +/- 0.000001
      degrees, you may some day prove the universe is non-
      Euclidean, but you could never prove it is Euclidean! It may
      be "skewed", but just less skewed than your instruments can
      measure.
 
    ncallaway - 7 hours ago
    > For 130 million light years the difference between
    gravitational wave signal and gamma burst is 2s. That
    constrains the speed difference to 1.6e-18 m/s.This assumes
    that the production of gravitational waves and the gamma rays
    occurred at the same time.
 
  perlgeek - 8 hours ago
  Yes
 
    LeifCarrotson - 7 hours ago
    Basically, yes: The speed of both gravity waves and light waves
    is limited by c, the speed of light in vacuum.But actually, no,
    because the light is not in a vacuum - it's ricocheting out
    from the center of a star, and bouncing through the
    interstellar medium (which is incredibly sparse; very nearly a
    vacuum: but there's an awful lot of it between these events and
    us).This is also the mechanism behind neutrino detectors. When
    a star's core goes supernova, it releases a cataclysm of
    neutrinos which pass through the upper layers of the star
    almost unaffected.  The light and radio waves are still
    bouncing around trying to get to the surface of the star, and
    the blast wave is still physically propagating much slower than
    the speed of light, but the neutrinos are long gone.  That
    gives scientists a short time period to point their telescopes
    in the right direction!Further
    reading:https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/235450/do-
    gravit...https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=6253263
 
      jamiek88 - 7 hours ago
      Yes and this is different in as much as LIGO / gravitational
      waves gave us the 'tip off' that the light was incoming, we
      fortunately had a satellite that captured that.It's a whole
      other information stream we are just learning how to use,
      basically with using gravitational waves we are at the stage
      Galileo was at with light. Very early, very low res but
      enough to give us massive new discoveries.So exciting.
 
occultist_throw - 8 hours ago
BTW, this is also the basis of a story by Greg Egan. Diaspora.
(Aside: I highly recommend Greg Egan's work, especially
Diaspora)The claim he makes in the fiction novel, is that a neutron
star-neutron star collision event would be enough energy to
sterilize 100 light year radius around the event. The one in the
novel happens closer than
100ly.http://www.gregegan.net/DIASPORA/DIASPORA.html
 
Gravityloss - 8 hours ago
Can some astronomer or physicist actually make an image where the
source is marked? All I see is some stars and a galaxy which is
basically and some textual explanation where I should look for it.
 
  chriskanan - 8 hours ago
  This article has pictures:https://www.washingtonpost.com/news
  /speaking-of-science/wp/2...
 
  knice - 8 hours ago
  There are before and after comparison photos
  here:http://reports.news.ucsc.edu/neutron-star-merger/media/
 
  WD-42 - 8 hours ago
  Here is a nice image
  https://lco.global/files/blog/lco_skymap_logo.jpg