GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-12) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Rejecting a candidate for over-qualification results in age bias
109 points by KentBeck
https://www.facebook.com/notes/kent-beck/over-qualification-wut/...
___________________________________________________________________
 
Anechoic - 20 minutes ago
When we talk about "desperate impact" in racism, this is the type
of think we're referring to. Yeah, you clean-shaven policy seems
fair, but but disproportionally affects a certain segment of the
population.Similarly "you over-qualified for this positions" seems
fair, it may even seem like you're doing the applicant a favor, but
if it disproportionally affects a particular community, perhaps
it's time to reflect on it.
 
  icelancer - 18 minutes ago
  Do you mean "disparate impact?"
 
    slg - 6 minutes ago
    A policy has disparate impact if it is not intentionally or
    directly discriminatory, but it disproportionately harms a
    protected group.  A random example might be to require that all
    employees are at least 6 feet tall.  That isn't inherently
    discriminatory against a protected class so it might appear
    legal at first look.  However it results in disparate impact
    because women are much less likely to satisfy the requirement
    than men.  It could therefore be ruled discriminatory if the
    business could not prove why the height requirement was a
    necessity for the job.
 
  [deleted]
 
taprun - 20 minutes ago
What is results in is an organization without a focus on hiring the
best people.  Do this for long enough and your company will die.
 
  jessriedel - 10 minutes ago
  The population mostly is what it is, so there ought to be
  companies and jobs designed for people who aren't elite.
  McDonald's doesn't focus on hiring the best possible worker, they
  focus on hiring conscientious workers who are at the appropriate
  point in their career/life that it's a good fit.
 
  Buttons840 - 2 minutes ago
  I'm currently working at a startup where we have a few developer
  in their 40's or maybe 50's (not sure how old some of them are
  really), but what I see is that the market and investors are
  rewarding us for "moving fast with broken things". For example,
  we have no plan for handling unicode, and when things break
  people just try random mixes of encoding, decoding, dropping
  characters, etc, until the thing works this one time. Subtle
  issues like this go deep in our system, and yet it apparently
  looks good to our investors and customers. We get out the
  features they need quickly, but people will be cursing our names
  for decades because of the technical debt we create.Maybe this is
  just because of my current situation, but it seems like the
  market rewards energetic programmers who can hack something
  together and constantly monitor and fix little bugs by hand any
  hour day or night. If this is what the market is rewarding then
  it seems legitimate to hire a bunch of cheap, young, energetic
  developers instead of more experienced developers.
 
jokoon - 19 minutes ago
Employers constantly tell me "Your resume looks great, you have a
lot of skills, so why is there a gap in those years? What were you
doing? Don't you have any experience in technology X or Y? You
might get bored here". I never get hired.
 
  komali2 - 10 minutes ago
  Next time this happens, I recommend trying to find the root
  cause. "I appreciate your concern - may I ask what experience has
  led you to believe someone with my qualifications would appear
  bored? From my perspective, I've only applied and kept in the
  hiring process to this point because I am interested in the long
  term."It's very likely they've got some other reason, and you can
  then clarify when they give you the "real reason" or adjust your
  process/resume/story for future applications with that
  information.
 
  smegel - 9 minutes ago
  Unless the gap was very recent, it would be weird for that to
  affect someone in software development. As a research scientist,
  sure (for better or worse), but if you have spent the past 5
  years doing X then you are quite well qualified to do X somewhere
  else.
 
  [deleted]
 
egwor - 19 minutes ago
I've been interviewing quite a few people for roles and more
recently there have been far more who have PhD's in Machine
Learning. I point out that role won't use these skills/expert
knowledge, and ask what they think. No one ever says that the role
is not for them but you know that if there were a machine learning
role open they'd jump at it, thereby costing the company money in
rehiring. It is a tough decision.
 
  mrkurt - 14 minutes ago
  What do they tell you they think? Do you reject them? I don't
  know many people who'd jump out of a good job for one that's more
  closely related to their school work.
 
  wwweston - 10 minutes ago
  The news that there are apparently people with PhDs in Machine
  Learning who are finding the job market difficult enough they're
  applying for unrelated technical positions seems like it runs
  counter to the conventional narrative about high demand and
  trouble finding truly qualified scientists...
 
    FLUX-YOU - 1 minutes ago
    >conventional narrativeThat shit's been broke for employees
    since Agile was successfully marketed and they figured out how
    to reproduce it (blogs, news, and conventions lead to
    consultants). Same for Big Data, ML, AI, coding bootcamps, and
    DevOps.
 
[deleted]
 
xchaotic - 11 minutes ago
In the end if don't want to hire you, they won't.  Now, rather than
being brutally honest, they invent ways around it.
 
  geofft - 4 minutes ago
  I'm not sure that's true. If they don't want to hire you, they're
  less likely to, but at some point it might not be worth the
  effort to come up with an excuse. And, importantly for an
  organization, "they" might be a subset of people. If I have a
  biased coworker (where "biased" can be anything, but let's go
  with age for now) who doesn't want to hire someone, but can't
  communicate their dislike in email without putting animus towards
  a protected class in writing, and the rest of the team is mildly
  positive, the fact that they couldn't be brutally honest is
  probably enough to go from a no-hire (via the coworker's veto) to
  a hire.
 
calt - 10 minutes ago
After my dad's manufacturing related engineering position moved
overseas he got told by an automaker that he was over-qualified for
line work. However no one was interested in his engineering skills
even after he tried to pivot to quality-control engineering.The pay
and work at the automaker would have been great for him. Instead he
ended up carrying mail until retirement.I constantly think about
him and remind myself to not get to comfortable in an industry.
 
  expertentipp - 5 minutes ago
  When I hear about getting too cosy in an automotive industry my
  brain screams "modern day Germany".
 
salqadri - 9 minutes ago
This doesn't happen just because of age. While I was living in
Canada, I met plenty of highly-qualified immigrants desperately
looking for jobs, and would routinely get this response even though
they weren't old or anything; its just that they would literally be
applying for low-skill jobs because the appropriate jobs would not
take them for lack of "Canadian Experience".
 
ChuckMcM - 7 minutes ago
The "traditional understanding" of getting an applicant to your job
that is over qualified is that they are just trying to get a
paycheck while they look for something better.I put that in quotes
because yes, I've seen it also result in an age bias and as I went
from one side of the equation to the other, I spent some time
evaluating what was and was not important to me as an
employee.About 15 years ago I came to the conclusion that "over
qualified" was never a legitimate disqualifying disposition of a
candidate. Simply put, if you are applying for a job that needs
less skills than you bring and are willing to take the salary that
is offered, how far 'beyond' the requirements you go is irrelevant.
I asked a hiring manager at Google once if they would tell a sales
guy "No I don't want the Ferrari at the same price as this Mazda
Miata, its more sports car than I need to get around." Even if you
never expect to challenge the top end of the sports car you
probably won't turn it down. Similarly with employees, if you are
up front with them about what the job entails and they are ok with
it, who are you to say they will be "bored" or "twiddling their
thumbs all day" ?Answer is, you aren't. Hire them and get get a
discount on skilz they are offering you. Your company will be
better for it.
 
  trhway - 3 minutes ago
  >"No I don't want the Ferrari at the same price as this Mazda
  Miata, its more sports car than I need to get around." Even if
  you never expect to challenge the top end of the sports car you
  probably won't turn it down.Ferrari comes with very high
  maintenance costs, well beyond what regular Miata buyer can
  comfortably afford.
 
  jeremyt - 3 minutes ago
  Not if it takes 6 months to get a new developer up and running on
  the codebase, and then they leave just when they are getting
  productive.
 
  salqadri - moments ago
  Not if the person feels demotivated by the fact that the job is
  not taking advantage of their skills or experience. People want
  to feel respected and appreciated for what they bring to the
  table. Without that, they may lose motivation and thus be less
  productive than a fresh person with a strong desire to learn and
  grow.
 
shove - 6 minutes ago
I received some advice to omit the first 5-ish years positions from
my resume and ?reword? the line referring to my 20 years of
industry experience. I'm older than my boss and it's definitely a
bit scary. YMMV
 
WalterBright - moments ago
When your date dumps you after the first date, the reason they give
is never the truth. It's the same when they reject you for the job.
There's not much of a percentage in stewing or arguing about it.