GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-12) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The Toxic Saga of the Tsukiji Fish Market
61 points by fern12
https://www.eater.com/2017/7/25/16019906/tokyo-tsukiji-toyosu-ol...
___________________________________________________________________
 
NegativeLatency - 1 hours ago
It's really frustrating how hard it is to properly manage/use a
resource like the ocean.We're not running out of chicken, but we
are running out of fish.
 
  duncan_bayne - 45 minutes ago
  Tragedy of the commons. If people owned areas of the ocean in the
  way they own areas of land for farming, this would be less of an
  issue.
 
    wavefunction - 19 minutes ago
    There are plenty of examples of well-managed fisheries but it
    takes cooperation with/from the fisherman and enforcing the
    regulations so that fisheries remain sustainable.Here's a list
    of North American fisheries, some of which are well managed:
    http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/statusoffisheries/2011/second/Q...
 
    gumby - 34 minutes ago
    Look how Victor Harbour in Douth Australia managed its fishing
    allocations for a great example of how to pull this kind of
    thing off. But it?s not easy
 
    Sangermaine - 22 minutes ago
    It's not quite as easy with the ocean. Land doesn't tend to
    flow around freely.
 
  sandworm101 - 1 hours ago
  Because we are feeding the fish to the chickens.  We provide the
  calories for the chicken to grow, but we harvest fish without
  such inputs.  If we were harvesting wild chickens, or at least
  chickens that caught their own food in the wild, we would
  certainly wipe them out in a matter of days if not hours.
 
donw - 12 minutes ago
Funnily enough, I live in Toyosu, and can see where the market
should have been moved to from my house.The cause is simple enough:
graft and corruption on all levels and at a massive scale, exposed
in large part by Yuriko Koike (the relatively new governor of
Tokyo).
 
partycoder - 2 hours ago
One of the few fish markets selling whale meat. But the tourist
community keeps tolerating it.update: And for some reason I get
downvoted for denouncing something that is against our best
interest... whales regulate the oceanic carbon cycle. You kill them
and contribute to ocean acidification.
 
  Larrikin - 1 hours ago
  I'm not for or against, I just don't understand the market. I had
  whale prepared a few different ways in Japan and they only decent
  preparation was thinly sliced and raw. It just tasted like a
  tougher, slightly fishier, worse version of beef. I could
  understand it if it was significantly cheaper than beef, since
  domestic and even imported beef can be pricey. But it's often
  times more expensive than anything but the highest quality.I
  expect the market will slowly collapse as the Japanese who grew
  up eating it in school slowly die out. Most people my age had
  never even eaten it.
 
    dnautics - 1 hours ago
    Someone once told me that the actual delicacy is whale blubber.
    You have to figure out what to do with the rest of the whale.
 
    partycoder - 1 hours ago
    Can't you just eat something else?
 
    sandworm101 - 1 hours ago
    It's an old people thing.  Once upon a time whale meat was
    served in Japanese schools.  Those who grew up eating it want
    to eat it now.  They are dying out and the younger generations
    (us) have no taste for the meat.Try finding anyone in the UK
    under 60 willing to eat tripe or jellied eels.
 
  rsync - 1 hours ago
  "update: And for some reason I get downvoted for denouncing
  something that is against our best interest..."I downvoted you
  for complaining about, or questioning, your downvotes.Don't do
  that.
 
  Cacti - 1 hours ago
  Alright, I'll bite, _how much_ do they regulate the carbon cycle?
 
    kobeya - 1 hours ago
    I believe he is referencing the fact that "whale falls" (the
    ecosystem that subsists for decades on the corpse of a whale
    that died and sank in deep water) move the mass of the whale to
    the deep ocean, where it typically doesn't surface except on
    geologic time.The obvious counter is that even at pre-human
    population levels the whales are an insignificant fraction of
    the shallow ocean biomass, and that artificial algea blooms
    over deep water could easily replace this carbon transfer in a
    sustainable way.Perhaps more interesting is that the lack of
    whale falls has probably already driven to extinction many of
    the deep water species that prey on the drop sites. Those that
    are left are at risk. And at least until we can catalog the
    genetic diversity of these ecosystems, that could be a
    tremendous loss. There may be biological processes adapted
    there that are useful to us, in bio-engineering or medicine.
 
      [deleted]
 
      [deleted]
 
      analogic - 1 hours ago
      Also their poops keeps nutrients in the system, feeding algae
      that consume co2 and feeding stuff that eat algae**citation
      needed
 
    partycoder - 1 hours ago
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2928761/
 
    sampo - 1 hours ago
    > _how much_ do they regulate the carbon cycle?"We estimate
    that rebuilding whale populations would remove 1.6?10^5 tons of
    carbon each year through sinking whale carcasses." [1]"these
    changes are small relative to the total ocean carbon sink"
    [1]The total ocean carbon sink is 10^9 tons of carbon each year
    [2]. So the changes in whale populations have had a 0.016%
    influence on the ocean carbon sink. So, not much.But in the
    future when different geoengineering methods are suggested,
    maybe their impact in terms of tons of carbon per year could be
    compared to the size of this effect of stopping whaling
    altogether.[1] http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1
    371/journal....[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_sink
 
  hellofunk - 1 hours ago
  That is unfortunate. Whale hunting is illegal now in many
  countries, but the Japanese do like whale meat and continue to
  find ways to hunt them. I saw an interesting documentary maybe 4
  years ago about how some hunting ships would find whales under
  the guise of science research, but really harvest them for food.
  Some countries stopped honoring the scientific licenses of the
  Japanese ships that allowed them to enter their waters. I'm not
  sure how much the affinity for whale meat has to do with tourism,
  though.
 
    partycoder - 1 hours ago
    The research rhetoric itself is questionable. Research is
    expected to at least produce some report or publication, but
    many of them have produced neither for years.
 
    labster - 35 minutes ago
    The Japanese people largely don't like whale meat.  Its sales
    have been declining and they're having a hard time convincing
    children to eat this weird fatty meat.  Japanese whaling
    probably won't last another generation.  But the Japanese do
    like tradition, so for now, whale hunting persists.
 
  seiferteric - 1 hours ago
  Honestly the entire seafood industry is a disaster. Nearly 80% of
  the ocean biomass has been destroyed. It's the only part of the
  food system that still relies on hunting wild populations of
  animals and between the many countries involved, it's really hard
  to regulate how much is really being taken. It's very depressing
  how many species are on the brink because of this.
 
    rodgerd - 23 minutes ago
    It's the food equivalent of oil drilling.  Oddly enough, it
    seems many folks who are uncomfortable eating land animals for
    ethical reasons have no qualms about strip-mining the oceans.
 
[deleted]