GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-12) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
New periodic orbits of the three-body problem
86 points by msuvakov
https://phys.org/news/2017-10-scientists-periodic-orbits-famous-...
___________________________________________________________________
 
phkahler - 2 hours ago
Are any of them dynamically stable?
 
  Pxtl - 1 hours ago
  Yeah, that's what I'm curious about.  Would all of them deviate
  if they were breathed on wrong?  Could any of them occur in
  nature?
 
davesque - 3 hours ago
From a complete layman's point of view, I wonder if it's
appropriate to think of a three-body system as somehow irreducible.
In other words, maybe a "closed-form" representation of three-body
motion can be defined in terms of a finite combination of stable
periodic configurations.  Anyway, just some musings.
 
  sova - 3 hours ago
  Irreducible is a good way to describe the equally-balanced
  constraint in a 3-body situation.
 
powertower - 2 hours ago
Is there an upper limit on how many different periodic orbitals a
3-body system may have?
 
  ChuckMcM - 38 minutes ago
  Generally if you could prove that there was, or that their
  wasn't, you would probably win the Fields Medal at least.
 
forkandwait - 1 hours ago
> Today, chaotic dynamics are widely regarded as the third great
scientific revolution in physics in 20th century, comparable to
relativity and quantum mechanics.Really??
 
  twic - 43 minutes ago
  I wonder if that tells you something about the author's age.
  Chaos theory was the next big thing in the '80s and '90s - recall
  that Jeff Goldblum played a chaos theorist in Jurassic Park in
  1993! It seems much less exciting today. I think it gave way to
  string theory, and now we have AI (yet again).
 
  alanbernstein - 1 hours ago
  I've never heard such a thing, but if you think of "chaotic
  dynamics" as responsible for the dramatic improvement in weather
  prediction, it might start to make sense.
 
    [deleted]
 
sizzzzlerz - 2 hours ago
So if the problem was first proposed by Newton in the 17th century,
how did early investigators simulate the interactions between the
bodies up until the electronic computer became available. There are
no closed form solutions A.F.A.I.K. so they must have calculated
the body's state by hand, I guess. How tedious.
 
  rwmj - 1 hours ago
  My probably naive intuition says that if you had a system with
  two "suns" in the centre rotating around each other very closely,
  and one distant planet rotating about the centre of mass of the
  two suns, that would be stable surely?
 
    musgravepeter - 1 hours ago
    Yes, that does work. In the literature this is called a
    "heirarchical system"The very simplest version is called the
    Euler problem. Two fixed masses and a third moving in the
    "dipole field". All the  solutions can be explicitly determined
    (although only in terms of e.g. Jacobi elliptic functions and
    other elliptics). There's a book "Integrable Systems in
    Celestial Mechanics" by Mathuna.I recently added the Euler
    problem to my iOS app ThreeBody: https://appadvice.com/app
    /threebody-lite/951920756Some day I'll get around to adding
    these 600 solutions...
 
      adrianratnapala - 40 minutes ago
      Right, but this dipole solution will neglect the perturbation
      of the third body on whatever is creating the dipole.  Fair
      enough, because we expect the effect to be tiny.But still you
      would have to unpack that dipole approximation to figure out
      if this perturbation will slowly change it in ways that do
      something significant in the long run.
 
  musgravepeter - 2 hours ago
  With some symmetry you can find a couple of solutions, which is
  what Laplace and Lagrange did. e.g. http://www.phys.lsu.edu/facul
  ty/gonzalez/Teaching/Phys7221/T...The scholarpedia article is a
  good meta-
  reference:http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Three_body_problem
 
  [deleted]
 
fdej - 2 hours ago
The "CNS" is as far as I can tell just the use of a high order
Taylor series together with multiple precision arithmetic for
solving ODEs. This is a well known method for long term simulation
of dynamical systems that has been around for decades. The authors
basically imply that they invented this method and were the first
to be able to study long term evolution of dynamical systems
reliably because of it. Fair enough if they just weren't aware of
previous work (which happens all the time), but it's an oversight
that shouldn't have passed peer review.That said, using this method
to discover new periodic solutions of the three-body system is a
very neat application, which deserves applause!
 
  spuz - 1 hours ago
  Are you sure that their numerical method isn't new? The abstract
  says that the author created it in 2009 and this paper further
  develops it to apply to the three body problem. If it already
  existed, can you say why it had not already been applied to the
  three body problem?
 
trhway - 3 hours ago
as we know  it is too late, trisolaris fleet is already under way,
and the problem with the human science progress is so apparent that
it even became a subject of the recent Big Bang Theory episode.
 
  lnanek2 - 20 minutes ago
  fortunately, we live in a dark forest, and need only threaten to
  shine a light to make the invasion fleet pointless...
 
  hellcow - 2 hours ago
  For those downvoting, the above comment is a reference to a
  terrific sci-fi novel, "The Three-Body Problem," which focuses on
  the same problem discussed in the article.
 
musgravepeter - 3 hours ago
The pre-print from arxiv: https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00527v4
 
ccleve - 2 hours ago
I'm halfway through The Three Body Problem, a science fiction novel
by Chinese author Cixin Liu. The apparent irrationality of three-
body orbits is central to the story. So far, it's excellent, both
as science fiction and as social commentary on contemporary China.
 
  shpx - 48 minutes ago
  (minor spoiler) in my opinion, any book that violates the theory
  of relativity is not science fiction, it's a fantasy novel set in
  "space".You can't transmit information faster than light using
  quantum entanglement.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faster-than-
  light#Quantum_mech...
 
    ericjang - 41 minutes ago
    Maybe the laws of our math and physics are not invariant to
    space and time :)
 
  zem - 2 hours ago
  amazing series! book 2 is probably the most mindblowing sf novel
  i've read since brin's "startide rising"
 
    sova - 2 hours ago
    Have you read Nexus yet?
 
      ChuckMcM - 42 minutes ago
      That would be more literally mind blowing :-) but I can
      heartily recommend it.
 
      westoncb - 25 minutes ago
      I'd second this recommendation: Nexus is one of the most
      interesting and entertaining sci-fi novels I've read in
      recent years.I'd heard the sequel was not so good?anyone have
      an opinion?
 
sp332 - 3 hours ago
The site hosting the videos is down. Are there only 6 families (as
in the caption at the top) or 600? Are all of the orbits discussed
in the article in 2D or are some of them 3D? At the end it says the
new CNS technique found only 243 new families, so how were the
hundreds of other new ones found?
 
  sova - 3 hours ago
  CNS from the article, " clean numerical simulation" enabled them
  to find 243 more than what the computational power was capable of
  finding with a lossy representation of periodicity.  In other
  words, the strength of the machine using old-style algorithms for
  detection would have gotten 357+ solutions, and their use of CNS
  which cleans up the math a lot for the supercomputer helped them
  find an additional 243 that would have slipped through the
  cracks.