GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-12) - page 2 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
How to Set Up a Company in Germany for English-Speaking People
146 points by shapiro92
https://blog.datacircle.io/2017/10/11/setting-up-company-in-berlin/
___________________________________________________________________
 
0xfaded - 4 hours ago
Countries in Europe now offering start-up visas (without major
capital requirements):  - Denmark    - France   - Italy   -
Netherlands   - Spain   - Portugal   - Lithuania   - Estonia   -
Austria   - Sweden  I'm currently applying for Denmark. Invest
Denmark has offices all over the world (including Palo Alto) and
will be more than happy to assist you through the process.I've been
in SV for 3 years, but never went for the green card. The US won't
let me stay, so I guess I'll have to go suppress wages somewhere
else.
 
  [deleted]
 
gibasmaciej - 5 hours ago
4-5 weeks ?!
 
[deleted]
 
  flexie - 5 hours ago
  How does a buyer know that there are no hidden liabilities in
  your GmbH? Does it come with your personal representations and
  warranties securing that?
 
    Xylakant - 5 hours ago
    A GmbH would need to have proper accounting, all liabilities
    would have to be in the books. Anything else would be fraud and
    that?s one of the things that suddenly pierces the veil of the
    limited liability for the CEO (whether you can extract any
    money from the seller is a different, albeit related question)
    Do your diligence. You could also make the personal liability
    part of the sale. On the upside, buying a used GmbH may come
    quite a bit cheaper if the company owns no assets: the initial
    25k are not a minimum that needs to be kept, they can be spent
    on things the company needs, so you might be able to pick up an
    empty shell for far less than that amount.I?d not buy a GmbH
    from a random person on the Internet, but if you?re in a hurry
    to get a GmbH set up, there are notaries and lawyers that
    specialize in selling ready-made GmbH shells.You?d still have
    to get the sale notarized and probably need to jump through a
    few hoops to rename the company to something suitable, but
    there are a few reasons that may be attractive, primarily that
    it offers limited liability from day one. Quite a few people
    forget that in the intermediate phase between notary and
    confirmed registration (GmbH in Gr?ndung) the shareholders are
    personally liable for all businesses and contracts that the
    company enters into.
 
martinald - 4 hours ago
What a giant pain in the ass compared to a UK incorporation. Takes
about 5 mins, ?15 and less than a day to form.You can also sign up
for taxes online in a few clicks.
 
ivan_gammel - 5 hours ago
The Very Important Question is how much time and money it takes to
close the company, not how to open it. Not all startups are
successful, so it always makes sense to think about the shutdown.
 
  shapiro92 - 5 hours ago
  you have to continue doing taxes for another 3 years if I am not
  mistaken.  Depending on your accountant that would be around 1k
  per year.
 
daftmonk - 4 hours ago
Just want to note that if you're not tied to Germany in particular,
Netherlands is a much better option for US citizens looking to
start a company, thanks to the Dutch-American Friendship Treaty.
(yes, it's DAFT - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DAFT). NL is a
pretty easy place to business, at least as an entrepreneur. (Things
get more complicated with lots of employees, like in most of
Europe.)The tl;dr version is US citizens can get a residency permit
(2 years, renewable indefinitely, considered a non-temporary
purpose of stay so you're eligible for permanent residency after 5
years) to start a business in the Netherlands with very few
restrictions and very little in the way of capital requirements
(?4500 in the business account.) Plenty of attorneys in the
Netherlands can take care of the necessary paperwork for ?1500,
give or take, but lots of people manage it themselves too.A few
blogs and guides of the many out
there:https://daftvisa.wordpress.com/step-by-step-guide/
https://survivingdaft.tumblr.com/ http://passthesourcream.com/daft/
 
  beagle3 - 1 hours ago
  Will the Dutch actually let you manage your finances if you are a
  US taxpayer? Many countries will now limit US tax payers to
  checking accounts exclusively, sometimes blocking money transfers
  and stuff - thanks to FATCA.Furthermore, US taxpayers have crazy
  FBAR/FATCA reporting requirements about any money you have
  signatory rights outside the US, even if it isn't their money -
  to the point that having e.g. a CFO with a US citizenship -- even
  if they never set foot in the US -- is becoming a serious
  liability for a company.
 
  atupis - 3 hours ago
  Estonia is also good option https://e-resident.gov.ee you can do
  everything remotly
 
  archagon - 4 hours ago
  Have been seriously thinking about doing this, but the residency
  requirements give me pause. (You must always have a mailing, non-
  PO-box address in NL ? essentially, your own place ? and have to
  stay in the country 6 months out of a year, though apparently
  it?s not really enforced.)In Europe right now and maybe 25-75 on
  just pulling the trigger... who knows if our so-called president
  ends up doing something stupid that blows up this treaty? No
  other easy paths to residency in the EU as far as I?m aware!
 
    CalRobert - 10 minutes ago
    Well, there's always the whole "get a job" path. If you're
    single you might find a European partner which helps.If you're
    a US citizen another temporary option (but among the easiest)
    is to get a working holiday visa for Ireland. I believe it's
    the only EU nation offering working holiday visas to the US. I
    probably wouldn't bother with it if the DAFT were an option -
    when I got one it was much earlier in my career.Not sure how
    the residency requirement is a bad thing? NL is pretty nice as
    I understand it. Incidentally, this blogger did the DAFT and
    describes their experience: http://shawnindutch.com/
 
      archagon - 7 minutes ago
      Yeah, I've read that blog! Very useful. I'm sure NL is
      wonderful, but I can't quite commit to living there full
      time. For one, all my friends and family live in California.
      It would be very hard to justify paying rent on an empty
      apartment for half the year just to keep qualifying, and I
      would surely get lonely in any case. (Although, I guess I
      could Airbnb it out if there are services that can do the
      landlordy bits while I'm away. It would be hard to set this
      up ahead of time, however. Even finding a regular, un-Airbnb-
      able NL apartment without the NL SSN-equivalent is a bit of a
      Catch-22, since most apartments require the SSN but applying
      for DAFT is what gets you the SSN in the first place. And you
      can't apply without a mailing address, as far as I'm aware.)
 
    eastendguy - 1 hours ago
    There is the blue card http://www.bamf.de/EN/Infothek/FragenAnt
    worten/BlaueKarteEU/...Essentially all you need is a normal IT
    job above a certain threshold
 
      archagon - 1 hours ago
      Sorry, I forgot to add ?...for a self-employed person?.
 
  jorvi - 4 hours ago
  Not only that, we are considered the best non-native English
  speakers of the world, so even if you aren't keen on learning
  Dutch (boo!) you'll manage pretty easily :)
 
    astrange - 2 hours ago
    They're also all taller than you, so you'll have to get used to
    looking up.
 
    ant6n - 3 hours ago
    The Dutch are also great at German!
 
      Freak_NL - 3 hours ago
      Only in as far as our languages are similar (they are more
      closely related than either of them is to English). A lot of
      younger Dutch are quite limited in the languages they speak;
      often just Dutch and passable English. Don't expect people
      under 30 to be able to read a German newspaper
      comprehensively or hold a conversation beyond ordering beer
      in a Biergarten when in Germany. Older generations with a
      tertiary education degree often can speak and read at least
      either French or German at a more useful level though.
 
        pwagland - 2 hours ago
        While this may be true, you will find quite a reasonable
        number of people who can speak non-English foreign
        languages quite well, and that excludes the foreign
        nationals that come to live and work in the Netherlands as
        well.If you wanted to serve a largely German speaking
        clientele, then you could reasonably expect to get a decent
        number of applicants in the Netherlands in my experience,
        especially in the border regions. The kids here are still
        learning German and French in school, and while they might
        speak it less, there are still plenty that go there
        regularly.
 
    sarabande - 3 hours ago
    I looked this up to make sure [0]; it's true, and the countries
    with a "very high" proficiency are:    01 Netherlands     02
    Denmark     03 Sweden     04 Norway     05 Finland     06
    Singapore     07 Luxembourg  0: http://www.ef.com/epi/?mc=we
 
      Geekette - 1 hours ago
      I question the validity of "global" rankings that don't
      include regions like East, West or South Africa, where
      countries like Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa have very
      high English proficiency rates (especially given that it's
      also an/the official language in most cases).
 
        oblio - 1 hours ago
        I think the point of those ranking is ESL. So if English is
        an official language, you're out ;)
 
  [deleted]
 
earlybike - 2 hours ago
Before setting up companies in a different countries than where you
live: This can get very messy and you should either have the
company in the country where you live or live in a country which is
very tolerant (tax-wise) about having companies in other
countries.On a secondary note: Germany is the worst country to
incorporate: bureaucratic, expensive, tax offices are expensive and
stuff is complicated, worst privacy regulation to come (from a
company perspective), Labour is expensive compared to their skill
level and English skills.One good thing though: since share
transactions are done with state notaries there is more safety when
doing them and less need for lawyers for simple transactions. For
more complicated transactions with higher funds it gets expensive
again. The Articles of Association must be German, the rest can be
in English.
 
nik736 - 4 hours ago
You can also found the GmbH with 12,5k EUR instead of 25k, which
makes much more sense than going the UG route.
 
shapiro92 - 3 hours ago
A few cents from my side, setting up a company like GmbH or UG
helps when you target a German market.  Germans are like that, they
love to see the GmbH after the name of the company that they own or
they buy / collaborate with.Now an UG is young in comparison to
GmbH, it is slowly being accepted.
 
weinzierl - 3 hours ago
Incorporating as a GmbH is the most common way to start a company
in Germany (about 40%). The UG form is not very common (about 9%)
and especially if you plan to do business with other companies in
Germany I would not recommend it, because UGs are often frowned
upon.Founding a GmbH is not only relatively expensive, it also
takes  time. Many founders avoid incorporating themselves but
prefer to buy a new GmbH. This is actually a business here, there
are companies that keep a pool of fresh GmbHs and sell them to
founders. Search for 'Vorratsgesellschaften' if you are interested
in going that route.
 
k__ - 6 hours ago
Is this even necessary?Can't they simply set up an LTD in Ireland
and "use" it in Germany?I know some Germans who did this for tax
reasons, but I could imagine that Ireland formalities are easier to
understand for English speakers.
 
  gwbas1c - 6 hours ago
  I've found that it's always easier to follow "normal" routes
  until you know what you're doing. In the US, the equivalent is a
  Delaware corporation. Companies typically incorporate in the
  state they operate in when they are small and the owners are more
  concerned about running their business. Reincorporating in
  Delaware happens when companies are large enough to hire someone
  to handle the paperwork.
 
    ringaroundthetx - 5 hours ago
    > Reincorporating in Delaware happens when companies are large
    enough to hire someone to handle the paperwork.right, all
    $200/yr worth of work.anyway, Europe is full of little hamlets
    that offer convenient incorporation services.
 
  Xylakant - 6 hours ago
  You can do that, but then you?ll have to deal with Irish Tax law
  and if you want to pay yourself a wage you?ll be employed by an
  Irish company. This will lead to it?s own set of complications.
  You?ll probably need a bank account in Ireland etc. If you?re
  selling things in germany you?d still need to collect German VAT
  depending on whether your customer is a company or a private
  entity, ...Registering a British LtD used to be common when the
  UG didn?t exist and you?d need at least 25k for a GmbH to get
  limited liability, but it?s fallen a bit out of fashion since
  then.
 
    Sujan - 5 hours ago
    And now there is a Brexit looming... Poor LTD owners :/
 
      Xylakant - 5 hours ago
      No pity from my side, but yes. Some folks will pay a hefty
      price for the shortcut.
 
        phillc73 - 5 hours ago
        Another shortcut, while still remaining in the EU is a
        Maltese Limited company. Very similar rules and structure
        to operating a UK based Limited company, but a much better
        corporate tax regime.I went this route, using an accountant
        recommended by a trusted friend. Bought an existing "off
        the shelf" company and have a Maltese business bank
        account, all without leaving the comfort of my desk.
 
          charlesdm - 5 hours ago
          Have you physically been to Malta? Do you pay non Maltese
          taxes? Do you understand tax law? If no then it is likely
          you are committing tax fraud (perhaps without even
          realising it).People need to understand this: there is no
          free lunch. If you  think you can be classified as a
          Maltese company, sitting at a desk in           European country here>, you are dead wrong in 99.9% of
          the cases. Get proper tax counsel (not an accountant, a
          lawyer -- accountants are generally sloppy with details,
          and details matter, e.g. a word in a contract can
          matter).Technology and internet based businesses have
          some unique opportunities to optimise taxes, but the line
          between fraud and optimization is quite thin.. get good
          counsel, or prepare for a dispute where you take your
          (local) tax authority to court.Source: a decent knowledge
          of corporate and tax law and plenty of tax disputes,
          which I've mostly won.
 
          a-saleh - 4 hours ago
          If I am thinking about something like this (my reason so
          far is fairly contrived, but I would really like to use
          Stripe, that is available i.e. in Ireland, while in mz
          country, it mostly seems to be paypal/braintree), where
          would I be able to read-up on gotchas, before I consult a
          proper lawyer?
 
          charlesdm - 4 hours ago
          You probably want to consult a (reputable) local tax
          lawyer. They tend to be expensive, but check
          legal500.com.
 
          phillc73 - 4 hours ago
          Thanks for your concern, but I am very happy with the
          professional advice I have received and am entirely
          confident that no tax fraud is being committed.
 
          graeme - 4 hours ago
          I read your comment, and the feedback you?re replying
          to.I notice that you have not mentioned the word
          ?lawyer?. Instead you said accountant and professional.
          I?m going to write the rest of this on the assumption you
          have not spoken to a tax lawyer.You?ve set up a structure
          for years, and are likely investing tens or hundreds of
          thousands in equity.A consultation with a good tax lawyer
          can be had for $100-$200 in most cases, or even free
          sometimes.Your situation might be 100% correct! In which
          case, you have spent very little.But if your situation is
          wrong? You risk the total destruction of your business,
          tens of thousands in penalties and legal fees, and
          possibly jail.Speak to a lawyer, if you
          haven?t.Incidentally, I had the same idea as you:
          Canadian business, international clients. Could I
          incorporate abroad and save? My tax?s lawyer?s answer was
          no, the local revenue authorities would not see it that
          way.You?re in another jurisdicion, so the plan may work.
          But, you will spare yourself the possibility of ruin by
          checking with a tax lawyer in the jurisdiction you live
          in.
 
          charlesdm - 3 hours ago
          You're not wrong. I have a friend who used to work at PwC
          essentially handling tax avoidance tactics for clients,
          and she recently switched to a reputable accounting
          office due to unhealthy work pressure.She's knowledgeable
          and is clearly aware that the advice being given by her
          current accounting office is much worse (and often
          incorrect) in comparison to the advice given by people at
          her previous job.They're excellent at handling
          accounting, but not good at structuring (non local)
          things and avoiding tax.
 
          Keats - 4 hours ago
          How do you get around corporate tax residence?
 
          charlesdm - 4 hours ago
          Just make sure to have good legal counsel. Because
          something is "legal" for person X doesn't make it legal
          for person Y.A wealthy family with a company that employs
          1000+ people will generally get away with more than a
          lone wolf with no political connections (not that I'm
          saying you're a lone wolf, just saying it's not always
          clear cut). Best of luck!
 
          Xylakant - 4 hours ago
          You?d also have to obey the bookkeeping requirements of
          the companies country of origin. For example in germany
          the line between paying yourself a wage and ?verdeckter
          Gewinnentnahme? is important (you can?t just take money
          out of an LtD) and it?s important to understand the host
          countries law. When things start to go haywire you?d need
          to hire an expert in Maltese law and that may just be
          very expensive from the comfort of your desk. You might
          also in addition require an expert in German tax law on
          top of that. I?d avoid that.
 
          charlesdm - 4 hours ago
          There are also differences between pure emoluments and
          traditional board meeting or director fees, etc. You'll
          have to check the DTA between your country and Malta.In
          addition, (Maltese) social security might be due on
          salaries received, or could be exempt.
 
        Sujan - 5 hours ago
        "Funny" that the "bank" that is suggested in the article is
        one of them: https://www.getpenta.com/imprint.html
 
          shapiro92 - 4 hours ago
          they were part of an accelerator in the UK probably due
          to that.
 
shapiro92 - 5 hours ago
Guys I just released it also on ProductHunt!
https://www.producthunt.com/posts/how-to-setup-a-company-in-...
 
Scotrix - 5 hours ago
Don?t start a company in Germany if you don?t have to. Expensive
and bureaucratic tax system (accountants and time wise), regular
accountancy checks which you have to pay your accountant for, very
hard to close down and insolvency is very complicated.
 
  mannigfaltig - 4 hours ago
  [deleted]
 
    exhilaration - 4 hours ago
    Because it protects entrenched players?
 
    claudius - 4 hours ago
    It doesn?t really stifle innovation in any way?
 
  eastendguy - 4 hours ago
  Is this hearsay or your experience? "regular accountancy
  checks"... I even forgot when our last one was...maybe 5 years
  ago. And this seems is typical.
 
  matt4077 - 4 hours ago
  Meh... It's not quite as easy as one might wish, but I haven't
  seen any business where it had any significance. If you're small,
  it's about $300 to start and maybe around $500 for an
  accountant.It get's more complicated once you have employees, but
  even that's not relevant compared to almost any other aspect of a
  business. I think we're paying EUR30 per quarter for managing the
  employees taxes and various benefits.If you're doing GAAP
  accounting, you're 95% done with taxes as well. And since these
  standards have converged over the years, the only difference in
  bureaucracy that remains is people's enduring stereotypes.
 
  bflesch - 5 hours ago
  Yeah it is very bureaucratic indeed. If you want to raise money
  or add shareholders you need to make official  appointments w/
  lawyers and pay significant fees.
 
devdad - 5 hours ago
Is that correct, ?25000 to start a GmbH? The Swedish equivalent
(AB), probably some differences, costs ~?5000.I think the
registration cost another ~?150.
 
  beberlei - 5 hours ago
  It is not a fee you have to pay, you have to guarantee this
  amount of capital, sort of as a signal to other companies in the
  market what solvency to except at least :-)You can actually spend
  the money on things after the court verified the capital is
  present with your corporate bank.
 
    devdad - 4 hours ago
    This is the same as an AB. Many start by having ?5000 and then
    selling things they own such as computers to the AB, to get the
    funds "back". I think Sweden changed from ?10000 to ?5000 a
    couple of years ago.If the UG or GmbH goes belly up, am I in
    any way personally responsible?
 
      Xylakant - 3 hours ago
      The point where you?re selling private property to your
      company is the moment you really really really want to talk
      to a good tax accountant in germany. If you sell above
      reasonable price it?s considered tax fraud (verdeckte
      Gewinnentnahme) and the reasonable price is likely to be a
      point of contention between you and the tax authorities.
      Unless you haven very valuable machinery you want to place
      into the company it?s usually not worth it and in this case
      you?d want a third party to certify the price. You can,
      however, pay yourself a reasonable wage and there are pretty
      clear guidelines on what?s considered reasonable. Much
      cleaner and easier.Personal liability is a bit a complicated
      topic. If you?re a pure shareholder, your liability ends with
      the value of the shares. If you?re at the same time the only
      shareholder and the CEO and only employee you can be liable
      for quite a few things. (Social security, taxes, damages for
      your personal actions, anything that constitutes fraud, ...)
 
        charlesdm - 26 minutes ago
        This is simple and applies to most (Western) jurisdictionS:
        don't sell anything to a company you own or control, at an
        above market rate.Now, there are many ways to value
        something, and there is generally some room for
        interpretation on how much to charge exactly. But you will
        need to find a way to justify the price at which a
        transaction was concluded.With IP it gets a bit blurry
        (e.g. you might own some trademarks you want to transfer to
        your new company), but again, there are a ton of perfectly
        acceptable ways to value something and not face the wrath
        of your local tax collector. Just make sure you have a
        reasonable valuation, based on objective facts, and you'll
        (mostly) be fine.
 
  explodingcamera - 5 hours ago
  You can start a UG which is essentially the same as a GmbH for as
  few as 1?
 
    ohthehugemanate - 3 hours ago
    German business owner here. The accountants and tax lawyers
    here have all told me the UG is looked on with suspicion by the
    tax authorities.Don't start a company in Germany. Don't take it
    from me, take it from the World Bank, which ranks Germany 114th
    in the world for ease of starting a business. Just narrowly
    edging out the Dominican Republic.It sucks.
 
  bflesch - 5 hours ago
  You need 12.500? in the bank to start the GmbH. But you might be
  liable for another 12.500? (to reach full 25.000?) if things go
  south.
 
    jononor - 4 hours ago
    You must maintain this amount of capital at all times, or
    otherwise start insolvency procedures.
 
      Xylakant - 4 hours ago
      That is not true at all. You need to have that initially in
      the bank but you can absolutely spend it on whatever the
      company needs - services, wages, things. You can absolutely
      have a GmbH or UG without any cash left.
 
        devdad - 4 hours ago
        Is the finances of a UG/GmbH public information in Germany
        and easily obtained by citizens?
 
          Xylakant - 3 hours ago
          You need to file an end of year statement (Bilanz) with
          the register court the year after and these can be
          obtained for a moderate fee. The exact details on what
          needs to be filed depend on the size of the company,
          details (in german) are in this article https://www.gmbh-
          guide.de/jahresabschluss-bundesanzeiger.htm...
 
  rhblake - 4 hours ago
  Just to be clear, you don't pay the gov't ?5000 to start a
  Swedish AB, but you need a minimum of ?5000 share capital.If you
  want to be a sole trader (enskild n?ringsidkare/enskild firma)
  you need zero capital and the registration cost is zero (costs
  about ?100 to register a company name but that's optional) and
  everything can be handled online, although if you're not a
  Swedish resident you'd need a temporary personal number from the
  tax agency first.
 
    devdad - 3 hours ago
    Thanks for clearing that up, I now realize I was being
    misleading.
 
jankotek - 6 hours ago
> A GmbH requires a minimum of 25 thousand eurosSimpler advice; buy
a ticket to Bratislava and take it from there.
 
  dullgiulio - 5 hours ago
  Easier still, do it online in Estonia.
 
    patkai - 5 hours ago
    Yes, the e-residency is extremely cool and forward looking. And
    you don't even have to travel there, only to one of their
    embassies.
 
  beberlei - 5 hours ago
  That is the initial starting capital, not a fee. You can go on
  and invest or spend the money after court verified its available.