GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-09) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Tokyo Is Preparing for Floods 'Beyond Anything We've Seen'
132 points by blondie9x
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/06/climate/tokyo-floods.html?rib...
.html?ribbon-ad-idx=4&rref=climate
___________________________________________________________________
 
poulsbohemian - 2 hours ago
I may not understand the scope of this project, but when I read the
$2 billion, my thought was "wow that's cheap!" Consider the Big Dig
or the current Seattle tunnel, at $14B+ and $3B+ respectively.
 
  emodendroket - 2 hours ago
  To be fair, nobody would have undertaken the Big Dig if the true
  cost were known up-front.  And a debt that's 200% GDP is a unique
  circumstance.
 
    KGIII - 1 hours ago
    The Big Dig may have been closer to the budget, except it kept
    getting changed. An example would be that they initially
    planned on shutting down certain routes until a politician
    decided to announce that traffic flow would not be
    disrupted.That's great if you're paid to model the traffic but
    probably not so great if you now have to pay the added
    expenses.
 
      dghughes - 31 minutes ago
       But that indicates the project was not planned well since
      change requests for such a large project would have been
      expected.
 
        [deleted]
 
        KGIII - 17 minutes ago
        You can only plan on so much.Notably: I only modeled
        traffic. I am not to blame. ;-)(I have used that caveat so
        many times.)
 
  dageshi - 1 hours ago
  That's what I thought as well, $2 billion doesn't seem like that
  much for that kind of project?
 
  yborg - 1 hours ago
  Chicago metro Deep Tunnel :
  $3Bhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunnel_and_Reservoir_Plan
 
    akgerber - 1 hours ago
    Milwaukee, at well under 1/20th the size of Tokyo, spent $1B on
    a similar system: https://deeptunnelmke.com/impact/cost/
 
mikeyanderson - 2 hours ago
Hurricane Katrina was estimated to have over $200 billion in
losses?if that's true, it seems like there should be more
investment in this type of infrastructure.
 
  r00fus - 1 hours ago
  Why? When you can use disaster capitalism and profit on the
  "volatility" provided by such events?
 
    jtuente - 1 hours ago
    Thanks, Keynes.
 
    tonyedgecombe - 1 hours ago
    I've heard it said that in the UK a fatal car crash increases
    GDP by about ?1 million.
 
      robocat - 1 hours ago
      Reference?A quick skim only showed studies showing cost of
      each fatality e.g. USD 1.6e6 in US listed here https://crashs
      tats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/...
 
rgrieselhuber - 1 hours ago
Between natural disasters and weaponized weather modification (yes
it still sounds crazy but it's becoming increasingly clear that
it's a real thing), this is definitely a priority for a country
like Japan.
 
  xeroaura - 27 minutes ago
  I do believe there's a movie coming out with a similar premise of
  weather modification to control natural disasters gone wrong
  called Geostorm.
 
acabal - 2 hours ago
It's so crazy to me that everyone in vulnerable places--Tokyo and
Houston in the article for example--are happy to spend hundreds of
millions, even billions, to put a bandaid on their local climate
change problems.It seems like they all acknowledge the reality and
danger of climate change and are willing to spend money on it.In
TFA Houston wants $400 million to build a reservoir. They seem to
acknowledge that things are only going to get worse for them as the
years go on. And yet everyone there still drives everywhere spewing
carbon into their own air with every trip, public transit is in a
poor state, and oil exploitation continues apace. Everyone's OK
with spending money and manpower on huge public works projects, but
they're not OK with addressing habits and addictions that make the
projects necessary in the first place.It's as if our eyes can see
the oncoming train just a mile away, but instead of stepping out of
the way we want to build a mechanized winch that will temporarily
lift us over the train, and hopefully we'll be done building it
before the train hits us, and oh yeah, never mind how we're
supposed to get down, or the taller train after that one.Why can't
we put that money, effort, manpower, and will into actually
addressing climate change and make crazy projects like vast man-
made Mines-of-Moria-style underground tunnels and huge artificial
reservoirs unnecessary?Yes it's a global problem, but solutions to
global problems start at home. Throwing our hands up and saying
it's pointless until the other guy does something too can't be the
way to progress on this issue.
 
  wallace_f - 57 minutes ago
  This is all a great illustration of support for Elon Musk's idea
  that a carbon tax is the best way to fight climate
  change.Unfortunately, a global carbon tax would put the billion
  dollar Climate Change Bureaucracy Industry nearly out of
  business. And people act like we haven't seen this kind of
  perverse incentive structure--bureaucratic inertia--before with
  the War on Poverty, War on Drugs, War on Terrror, etc.: they all
  end up focusing on self-perservance rather than their apparent
  objectives.
 
  gozur88 - 57 minutes ago
  Japan didn't (over)build that flood control system because
  they're worried about global warming or thousand year floods.They
  did it to create jobs.  In the same way the US is said to have a
  "military industrial complex", Japan has a "construction
  industrial complex", wherein the government builds a whole lot of
  infrastructure the country can't really justify or even maintain.
  Flood control, rail lines, airports, etc.  It's all stuff an
  industrialized country needs, but the Japanese take it up to
  eleven in an effort to stimulate the economy.
 
  wizardforhire - 1 hours ago
  Climate change is in dire need of a Themistocles type character
  that can sway the public. The current talking heads I feel are
  just not up to the task. Someone who the right can relate to who
  but doesn't alienate the left in the process and who can rise
  above the media noise and can encapsulate their arguments into
  easily digestible sound bites so as to not get lost. There's no
  doubt humanity is in for a hep of trouble in the immediate
  future, however the powers at be are too disjointed with
  conflicting interests to be expected to reach a rationale
  consensus. It Doesn't help that the right has developed some
  pretty powerful newspeak rife with thought terminating cliches
  that makes argument all but impossible. If history is any
  consolation, things are going to get a whole lot worse before
  they get better. Unfortunately things getting worse in this case
  means it'll probably be too late to make things better.
 
  mkempe - 1 hours ago
  Building such infrastructure does properly address specific risks
  of natural disasters and climate change.One should not assume
  that climate changes have been, are, nor will be, exclusively
  caused by human action; one should not think that there is a
  single, global path of action that will somehow set all future
  climates to some ideal version. More concretely, consider that we
  happen to live in an interglacial period. [1][1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interglacial
 
  eliben - 2 hours ago
  Tragedy of the commons - it's a ubiquitous and powerful economic
  principle.
 
    danharaj - 2 hours ago
    The tragedy of the commons is another name for the failure of
    private property and markets to account for externalities. For
    a real theory of the commons without leaving mainstream
    economics cf. Mary Ostrom's Governing the Commons. Otherwise,
    all of anthropology.
 
      nickik - 1 hours ago
      Elinor Ostrom.Nice podcast on some of these things: http://ww
      w.econtalk.org/archives/2009/11/boettke_on_elin.htm...
 
        danharaj - 1 hours ago
        Thanks for catching that. Must have amalgamated two
        economists in my head.
 
  bdamm - 2 hours ago
  It's clear that our contemporary social structures are not well
  equipped to deal with climate change. This is unlikely to change
  in the next 10-50 years. So local governments that are able to
  act must do so."Solutions to global problems start at home." -->
  If everyone in Houston switched up their SUVs for Prius', nothing
  globally would change at all, except that the people of Houston
  would have smaller cars. Why does this make sense for them?
 
    SapphireSun - 1 hours ago
    You're right that we require a policy attack on Climate Change,
    but nonetheless, it feels a bit odd to keep doing the thing
    that'll kill you.
 
    [deleted]
 
  jjawssd - 1 hours ago
  > In TFA Houston wants $400 million to build a reservoir. They
  seem to acknowledge that things are only going to get worse for
  them as the years go on. And yet everyone there still drives
  everywhere spewing carbon into their own air with every trip,
  public transit is in a poor state, and oil exploitation continues
  apace. Everyone's OK with spending money and manpower on huge
  public works projects, but they're not OK with addressing habits
  and addictions that make the projects necessary in the first
  place.It sucks to have to drive for miles to get anywhere in
  Houston. Public transportation is downright dangerous in Houston
  where the threat of violent crime is very high. It is not
  practical to arrive at work sweaty from walking or bicycling.
  Just being outside on a motorcycle moving at moderate speed
  causes intense perspiration within 10 minutes. Air conditioning
  is necessary. There is no alternative to the gasoline powered
  automobile because the city is planned so poorly. So you deal
  with it the only way you can by taking personal responsibility to
  ensure your own safety and comfort. Fundamentally the problem may
  be poor planning or that the government is dysfunctional and
  taxpayer money is squandered.
 
  nostrademons - 2 hours ago
  It's very likely that local band-aids are the most effective way
  to deal with this.Your train example is a pretty good one, but
  you've mixed up the metaphor.  Here, "stepping out of the way" =
  mass migrations out of coastal cities.  "A mechanized winch that
  temporarily lifts us over the train" = flood control projects
  like in Tokyo, Houston, Venice, or the Netherlands.  "Calling the
  train company and asking them to stop running trains" = stopping
  global warming by addressing carbon emissions.If you had a train
  barreling down on you, which one would you choose?  I'd bet it
  wouldn't be calling the train company and asking them to stop
  running trains, because a.) they are unlikely to anyway and b.)
  even if they were willing, by the time you got through to someone
  with the power to stop the trains you'll probably be dead
  anyway.I'd argue that the actual solution to global warming will
  be more akin to "stepping out of the way": people will evacuate
  from major cities, major cities will be destroyed, and people
  will pick up the pieces of their lives elsewhere.  If they're
  proactive, they might evacuate before the city is actually
  destroyed, and we'll see mass migrations of people (as have been
  happening for the last several hundred years anyway) away from
  areas that will face greater climate risks and toward areas that
  benefit from global warming.That's what humans do: we adapt to
  our environment.  Only in particularly hubristic times (like now)
  have we expected to adapt our environment to us.
 
    KVFinn - 1 hours ago
    >That's what humans do: we adapt to our environment. Only in
    particularly hubristic times (like now) have we expected to
    adapt our environment to us.Changing emissions profiles IS
    adapting.  We've already done it with smog and lead, etc.
 
    blondie9x - 1 hours ago
    Adaptation without mitigation will not be effective as the
    impacts worsen. Uncapped emissions and business as usual
    scenarios will cause outcomes that we will not be able to build
    ourselves out of.We must reduce emissions and push for
    sustainable infrastructure and solutions, now.We must adapt and
    we must also mitigate. Only through the combination of both
    efforts and through our determination and willingness to lead
    sustainable lifestyles will we be able to beat climate change.
    We must push for renewable energy, and technological solutions
    to efficiently use resources.The policy coming out of the White
    House is against these efforts and we need to find a way to
    prevent them from hurting us and our posterity by postponing
    the efforts to transition to clean
    energy.https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/09/climate/clean-power-
    plan....
 
      heartbreak - 1 hours ago
      Why can?t Tokyo attempt both adaptation and mitigation? Which
      happens to be exactly what they?re doing.
 
      nostrademons - 1 hours ago
      Nah, the problem is self-limiting.  If global warming reduces
      the carrying capacity of the environment, people will die.
      Dead people don't use resources; their bodies are returned to
      the environment by decomposers, where they will provide
      fertilizer for trees and other plants, which will grow even
      more abundantly because of the enhanced CO2 levels.
      Eventually the earth reaches a new equilibrium at a somewhat
      higher temperature.Most people don't want to die, and so we
      have a self-interested argument for not destroying our
      environment.  But we're at the top of the food chain - well
      before there's a lasting impact on the earth's ability to
      sustain life, we'll all be dead.  It's the height of hubris
      to believe we have the ability to effect lasting change on
      the earth's environment that won't disappear once we do.
 
        trophycase - 1 hours ago
        It's not true that a stable equilibrium is always reached.
        It's also possible that irreversible changes are set into
        motion which shift the equilibrium so far away from
        livability that humans cannot survive.
 
          btown - 1 hours ago
          See, for instance,
          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clathrate_gun_hypothesis
 
        jacobolus - 1 hours ago
        It seems that we could be headed for a mass extinction,
        whether or not humans manage to survive thousands of years
        longer.We aren?t going to entirely destroy life on the
        planet, which will eventually recover great diversity
        (speciation to fill new ecological niches in some new
        stable equilibrium) within a few million years after we?re
        gone, but it will look significantly different than what we
        are familiar with.That?s not much consolation to people who
        feel attached to what human societies and cultures we have
        all spent a lot of effort developing.
 
          averagewall - 58 minutes ago
          This issue is too political for normal people to properly
          understand. I don't mean to offend you personally but
          there's little value in the feelings of someone who's
          been immersed in a social atmosphere of global warming
          propaganda, calls to action, and pressure to shut down
          dissenting voices. Even scientists can't safely publish
          work on positive effects of climate change or areas where
          it's not as bad as previously thought without littering
          their papers with defenses of "but it's still bad".Your
          GP said "we must" do some things. No, there isn't a
          single obvious best answer. We don't know what the longer
          term effects will be and whether building protection will
          be enough or not - or enough to pay for their useful
          life. We don't have accurate science for that. Even if we
          did, we've still got hundreds of years to prepare, and
          importantly, future money to spend on it, which is
          cheaper than spending money today because of the time
          value of money. Every solution costs money and it's no
          obvious which one is cheaper.Where did you get the mass
          extinction and "entirely destroy life on the planet"
          ideas? I know there are frequent extinctions of insects
          and large mammals, but that's been going on for centuries
          and is nothing to do with global warming. Global warming
          might exacerbate that but again, I don't think we have
          clear predictions of whole food chain collapses.EDIT: I
          see you've toned down your comment from a strong belief
          to a suggestion of a possibility, so the main motivation
          of my reply doesn't really apply now.
 
          jacobolus - 50 minutes ago
          If we manage to e.g. change ocean conditions enough (and
          the changes are already dramatic) to take out a
          significant proportion of the plankton in the world, it?s
          not going to go well for us.
 
          specialist - 22 minutes ago
          Since we're talking about anthropocentric climate change,
          it's safe to assume "life" means "life as we know it".
          But you already knew that.
 
          Boothroid - 12 minutes ago
          This reads very much like a Bjorn Lomborg type argument -
          along the lines of: global warming is not proven, and
          anyway if it does happen it may not be all bad, and even
          if it is bad we could better spend the money elsewhere.
          Personally when it comes to disturbing planetary
          equilibrium I'd rather err on the side of caution.
 
          nostrademons - 1 hours ago
          We're not, actually:https://www.theatlantic.com/science/a
          rchive/2017/06/the-ends...I used to think that we were,
          and when I read that article, I kept looking for flaws in
          its logic or counterexamples in other press.  But
          ultimately, it interviews a real expert, and his logic is
          correct: we're drawn to flashy apex predators at the top
          of the food web, but these species spring in and out of
          existence all the time, and when it comes to the fossil
          record, they're barely a blip.  If we were actually in a
          mass extinction, we would be worrying about cockroaches,
          ants, and seaweed going extinct, not tigers and rhinos.
          And of course, we wouldn't be here to observe it.That's
          not an argument to completely fuck up the environment,
          since, like I mentioned, we'll be the first to go and
          most people have some sense of self-preservation, let
          alone preservation of the human species.  It is a
          reminder of just how insignificant we actually are on a
          planetary scale, and of how our cognitive biases often
          lead us to think that we are more important or more
          powerful than we actually are.
 
          jacobolus - 54 minutes ago
          Okay.> ?I think that if we keep things up long enough,
          we?ll get to a mass extinction, but we?re not in a mass
          extinction yet, and I think that?s an optimistic
          discovery because that means we actually have time to
          avoid Armageddon,? he said. [...]> ?The only hope we have
          in the future,? Erwin said, ?is if we?re not in a mass
          extinction event.?* * *I guess it?s a bit fuzzy where you
          draw the line. Perhaps mass extinction is not an
          inevitability and concerted global action or some
          technological breakthroughs could still save us, but it
          has an uncomfortably high likelihood considering how bad
          humans are at staving off uncertain long-term threats.
 
        [deleted]
 
        yongjik - 39 minutes ago
        LOL. Sigh.  Why does global warming attract this particular
        brand of sophistry all the time?"President, what's your
        solution to the North Korean nukes?""Nothing to worry: the
        problem is self-limiting.  If they start a nuclear war,
        billions will die, and then the survivors will be too poor
        to build any more nuclear weapons, so naturally there will
        be no more nuclear wars.""But what about Puerto Rico?  When
        are the aids coming?""The problem is self-limiting.  If we
        do nothing, most of them will die or simply move to
        somewhere else, and then next time another hurricane hits
        there will be less people to die!"
 
          nostrademons - 2 minutes ago
          Both of your examples are accurate descriptions both of
          the problems in question and of peoples' responses to the
          problems.To answer your question, though, the reason that
          these types of problems attract this kind of sophistry is
          because it's rational.  Even if one very much wants there
          to be a good-for-humanity, collective-action solution
          where everybody bands together to avert the destruction
          of humanity, anyone with a realistic perception of human
          nature will admit that there are people out there who
          don't give a shit about their fellow man.  Or who give a
          shit, but disagree with the facts you've presented, or
          who give a shit about certain segments of mankind but not
          you.  Not even a large majority of people, but as long as
          the solution requires the cooperation of everyone or is
          non-robust against defectors gaining a disproportionate
          amount of power over cooperators, it's a non-starter.
          And knowing that everybody else knows that, the rational
          prediction is that the problem will not get solved, and
          we're just fucked.  Better accept that and devote our
          energy into areas where it will actually make a
          difference.Which, ironically, is exactly the train of
          thought that led us into the problem of collective action
          in the first place.  But then, there's no other train of
          thought that leads to any other result, other than
          complete frustration.(When I was a kid, I thought a
          solution to this would be for all the cooperatively-
          minded people to band together and kill all the non-
          cooperative people, leaving the world populated
          exclusively by cooperative people.  As an adult, I
          realized that this "solution" makes everyone either dead
          or monsters far worse than the ones they were trying to
          eradicate.  That apparently hasn't stopped people from
          trying it, giving us the literal Holocaust and bloody
          Communist revolutions in Russia and China.)
 
        Boothroid - 24 minutes ago
        Remarkably blas? and somewhat nihilistic.
 
        [deleted]
 
    ced - 1 hours ago
    > I'd argue that the actual solution to global warming will be
    more akin to "stepping out of the way": people will evacuate
    from major cities, major cities will be destroyed,And the
    people too poor to evacuate will stick it out in the city
    hoping for the best, and die in the aftermath of the next
    catastrophe.
 
  brador - 1 hours ago
  Rational self-interested bots engineered to maximise shareholder
  value.
 
  hkmurakami - 1 hours ago
  Even billions is cheap for Japan given that their strongest
  export sector these days is automobiles.
 
  pascalxus - 1 hours ago
  The same thing happens with our health.  People would rather
  spend trillions of dollars on health care, rather than start
  eating healthy.  70% of all healthcare dollars go towards
  diseases and causes of death that are lifestyle related causes
  (eating, nutrtion, excercise, smoking, etc)
 
  gfdgsdgdfgsdfg - 1 hours ago
  Well, mitigation without adaptation would be a terrible idea.
  That's how you get screwed over by industrial countries with
  little regulation.Obviously the answer is a bit of both, so it's
  not entirely clear what you're arguing for....
 
  nickik - 1 hours ago
  Simple economics. Its a free rider problem, both on state to
  federal, as well as federal to global level. There simply are not
  the institutions to have global solutions.
 
  ryanmarsh - 1 hours ago
  Everyone's OK with spending money and manpower on huge public
  works projects, but they're not OK with addressing habits and
  addictions that make the projects necessary in the first
  place.Careful how you throw around ?they? there buddy. We
  Houstonians are 7 million diverse people doing the best we can
  with what we have.Thanks for your outrage on our behalf. Instead
  of grand standing and virtue signaling perhaps you could, you
  know, actually do something to help.
 
    wavefunction - 1 hours ago
    Y'all could build a robust mass-transit system and get those
    cars off of the road for a start.
 
      ryanmarsh - 1 hours ago
      What do you think we?ve been trying to do? Read the Houston
      Chronicle or Houston Press.
 
  neuronexmachina - 1 hours ago
  It's basically the Tragedy of the Commons on a global scale. The
  atmosphere is a huge public good, and climate change is a huge
  negative externality. It's relatively beneficial to the
  individual person, and even the individual country, to ignore the
  problem, even if it ultimately harms the population as a whole in
  the long run. That's why so many people prefer to ignore the
  problem or pretend it doesn't exist, rather than actually
  confront the issue.http://tragedy.sdsu.edu/
 
  ctdonath - 1 hours ago
  yet everyone there still drives everywhere spewing carbon into
  their own air with every tripThis.Every single person who claims
  they believe global climate change is a very serious, and man-
  made, problem absolutely should be taking personal steps now to
  address it. Telecommuting is a thing. Home-solar is a thing.
  Electric cars are a thing. Quit telling _others_ to solve the
  problems, and start doing it personally, now.Put another way: if
  you're seriously concerned about global climate change, and using
  gasoline-powered vehicles (directly or by proxy), you're not
  seriously concerned about climate change - and I can't take your
  concerns seriously because you don't.And "leaders" who take
  private jets to "climate change policy conferences" are straight-
  up charlatans.(I'd be construed as a "climate change denier", and
  yet I do more about mitigating climate change than anyone else I
  know.)Be the change you want in the world. You can afford it.
 
    WalterBright - 1 hours ago
    Changing economic behavior with public campaigns has a pretty
    much zero success rate. Anyone remember Pres Ford's "WIP"
    buttons (Whip Inflation Now)? It had the hubris that inflation
    could be stopped if only people would just stop raising
    prices.Even as a kid, I laughed at the absurdity of that
    campaign. Of course it had zero effect.Something that will work
    is to tax pollution, i.e. a carbon tax. Making it more
    expensive will do far more to influence behavior away from it
    than any marketing campaign. And besides, it raises spending
    money for the government, too.Using the tax system to
    "internalize the externalities" (economist jargon) is an
    efficient and effective way to do it.
 
      alexanderstears - 29 minutes ago
      Changing economic behavior with public campaigns has a pretty
      much zero success rate.yet advertising and marketing happens.
 
        WalterBright - 10 minutes ago
        When it's of immediate local benefit to the individual,
        yes.
 
      [deleted]
 
    notyourday - 1 hours ago
    > Every single person who claims they believe global climate
    change is a very serious, and man-made, problem absolutely
    should be taking personal steps now to address it.
    Telecommuting is a thing. Home-solar is a thing. Electric cars
    are a thing. Quit telling _others_ to solve the problems, and
    start doing it personally, now.Let me get it straight, you mean
    Leonardo Di Caprio, George Clooney and Al Gore should live like
    the peasants? Please, hold my beer.
 
      ctdonath - 1 hours ago
      Cognitive dissonance is unbecoming.Spewing tons of CO2 en
      route to a CO2 control conference, when the same ends could
      be met via teleconference, is hypocrisy.You can live well
      while reducing your impact on the environment. They certainly
      have the money to.
 
        comex - 31 minutes ago
        Is it?  I don?t think teleconferencing technology is at a
        state (yet) where it?s nearly as effective at conveying
        messages and building relationships as in-person
        conferencing.  It?s closer than it used to be, and it may
        get closer still in the future (e.g. if VR gets good enough
        that people want to use it for that), but for now it?s not
        there.  Teleconferencing also has a public perception of
        being cheaper and thus less important.  So, if the goal of
        a conference is to cause some measurable reduction in the
        expected amount of carbon being dumped in the future, by
        encouraging government action and such - it?s certainly
        debatable whether conferences can actually achieve that
        goal, but that?s the goal - then a virtual conference would
        probably result in a substantially smaller reduction.  And
        if a substantial portion of a measurable change is
        measurable, then it?s a lot bigger than the CO2 cost of
        some plane tickets, which at a global scale is
        immeasurable.On the other hand, making a point of using
        telecommunications could make for a good PR stunt, which
        could increase attention and thus effectiveness.  It could
        also help promote the idea of using teleconferencing as an
        environmental measure.  Overall, though, I?m not sure how
        good a stunt it?d be - it might give people the impression
        that fighting climate change requires people to make great
        personal sacrifices in their way of life, which, whether or
        not it?s true, could hurt the cause by creating cognitive
        dissonance.  (I?m pretty sure it?s not true, per se.
        Rather, it would require a ton of money, which would hurt
        people?s way of life indirectly, but not as obviously.)
 
    jacobolus - 1 hours ago
    There?s nothing inherently wrong with taking personal steps,
    but by themselves they are largely worthless. It?s like
    optimizing an I/O bound program by speeding up some of the
    arithmetic operations not on any critical path.Telling people
    who continue to commute by car or use grid electricity or
    travel internationally that they don?t really care about
    climate change is idiotic ? not just useless but actively
    counterproductive because it makes people dismiss you as an
    arrogant jerk.What?s needed are large-scale policy changes
    (international agreements, public investment in research and
    alternative infrastructure, changes to zoning laws, carbon
    taxes, regulations of agricultural runoff, crackdown on tax
    evasion and money laundering and international bribery, ...),
    which takes significant amounts of political organizing effort,
    money, and political capital (including flying various leaders
    around on jets).
 
      jjawssd - 42 minutes ago
      Your basic unquestioned assumptions are that humans have a
      non-negligible effect on global warming and that global
      warming exists. Instead of jumping to conclusions, we must
      also question and analyze the existing evidence for the
      premise.
 
      alexanderstears - 42 minutes ago
      Telling people who continue to commute by car or use grid
      electricity or travel internationally that they don?t really
      care about climate change is idioticThat's a strawman. What
      the parent comment says is that people's behavior reveals
      their preferences. A more clear example is this - someone who
      drives a Suburban for fun and burns their trash isn't in a
      good position to demand that others go out of their way to
      treat the earth better.
 
        JetSpiegel - 2 minutes ago
        > people's behavior reveals their preferencesOnly if they
        are rational economic actors.If you live in the sticks and
        want to buy food which is several kilometers away, do you
        throw up your hands in the air and starve so that you don't
        use your car?
 
    KVFinn - 1 hours ago
    >Every single person who claims they believe global climate
    change is a very serious, and man-made, problem absolutely
    should be taking personal steps now to address it.  Quit
    telling _others_ to solve the problems, and start doing it
    personally, now.This being effective seems contrary to
    everything we know about economics.  If even a huge portion of
    people voluntary lower consumption or energy usage, it frees up
    that energy to be consumed more cheaply by other people and so
    the overall consumption is hardly impacted.  Historically this
    is the case.If you don't price an externality into the market
    with a tax or credit or it's useless.Put another way: if you're
    seriously concerned about global climate change, and do not
    support pigouvian taxes or other policy that will actually have
    an impact, you're not seriously concerned about climate change
    - and I can't take your concerns seriously because you don't.
    You're just concerned about projecting the appearance that you
    care.
 
      alexanderstears - 31 minutes ago
      If even a huge portion of people voluntary lower consumption
      or energy usage, it frees up that energy to be consumed more
      cheaply by other peopleNot really, oil extraction is capital
      intensive, oil wells have finite lives, and you can count on
      people extracting the cheapest oil first. As fossil fuel
      demand drops, the risk of operating a well increases and that
      makes borrowing more expensive, the capital costs will be
      amortized across less energy so the energy will have to be
      more expensive, and energy should naturally get more
      expensive as time goes on and the easiest oil is depleted.
      Sure, technology changes and reduces the cost of extraction
      but moving away from fossil fuels isn't an incentive for
      developing more extraction technology.Not to mention that
      people's investments in alternative fuels / transportation
      brings the costs down for everyone else and as costs go down,
      more and more people will be willing to pay the eco-friendly
      premium until some day they're less expensive and people
      select eco-friendly consumption out of their own self-
      interest.I think this day is closer than most people realize
      for electric cars. Gear heads and regular folks are going to
      love electric cars when the batteries get better, at some
      point, it's going to cost a lot extra to get a ICE vehicle
      and that's going to be a rent extraction on idiots who dream
      of rolling coal in F250s.
 
      munificent - 16 minutes ago
          > You're just concerned about projecting the appearance
      > that you care.  This is a completely unnecessary,
      uncharitable attack. The reasonable interpretation of the
      parent comment is that they do actually care about climate
      change but the two of you disagree on which mechanisms will
      most effectively reduce it.
 
    savanaly - 1 hours ago
    This doesn't add up to me. I can be one of the two people in a
    prisoner's dilemma scenario and fully acknowledge the reality
    that I might be heading to jail while still playing the selfish
    strategy of snitching.Just because you recognize that your
    personal actions won't affect the outcome as it pertains to you
    doesn't mean you can't recognize that the personal actions of a
    large number of other people will affect the outcome as it
    pertains to you.
 
      roenxi - 50 minutes ago
      This isn't prisoner's dilemma though - everyone has a full
      ability to communicate with each other. That breaks a pretty
      basic assumption.To stretch your analogy, you are playing
      prisoners dilemma with someone who is swearing he will
      snitch, has a lawyer who is saying "my client will cooperate
      fully with the police" and who has signed a document
      explaining the facts.
 
        savanaly - 17 minutes ago
        In the classical prisoner's dilemma it doesn't matter
        whether the prisoners can fully communicate with each other
        or not as long as it hold that they cannot change their
        move after seeing what the other guy moved. And it's
        perverse because they both have a strategy A that strictly
        dominates B but if they both play A then they're worse off
        than if they both played B.
 
  s_kilk - 1 hours ago
  > Why can't we put that money, effort, manpower, and will into
  actually addressing climate change and make crazy projects like
  vast man-made Mines-of-Moria-style underground tunnels and huge
  artificial reservoirs unnecessary?In part because the Carbon
  Industry is huge and powerful, and holds power over most of the
  worlds major governments.I mean Rex Tillerson, the former head of
  Exxon Mobil is currently the US Secretary of State.The rest is
  because the machine of Late Capitalism is built on a presumption
  of endless growth with no consequences. The crisis that's
  barrelling down on us is so __alien__ to the established way of
  thinking that it's literally impossible for these economies to
  react with anything other than stupor and paralysis.
 
  ChuckMcM - 1 hours ago
  Preparing for the effects is much more practical, and something
  that you can execute against. I have long been a proponent of the
  notion that there is ample, and incontrovertible, evidence of
  climate change even before people started adding their own hand
  to the mix. As such, the expected value of a dollar spent on
  preparing for a change in climate gives a better return in terms
  of survivability than spending a dollar changing a local
  contribution to CO2 production. Spending money on both is even
  better.When one of the super volcanoes burps its going to screw
  up a lot of things, and it would be nice to have some options.
 
jpindar - 1 hours ago
Boston is too: https://www.boston.com/news/local-
news/2017/09/06/what-a-fut...
 
1125 - 2 hours ago
The caption of the last image says: "Visitors can tour the system,
which cost $2 billion and was completed in 2006." I hope that's
just a typo.
 
  sp332 - 2 hours ago
  Tokyo has a GDP of $1.6 trillion per year. And they have a lot of
  expensive property they want to protect from flooding.
 
  klodolph - 2 hours ago
  What part do you hope is a typo?
 
  mholt - 1 hours ago
  Yeah I wouldn't want to pay $2 billion for a tour.
 
  CognitiveLens - 2 hours ago
  Quick lookup of other sources all state figures between
  US$2billion and US$3 billion
 
  sxates - 2 hours ago
  I initially read that as the tour costing $2 billion. Seems a bit
  steep!
 
    segmondy - 2 hours ago
    Is it?  How much have the recent floods experienced in the
    Americas cost?
 
      arjie - 2 hours ago
      What is honestly going on in this comment section? First guy
      is confused by a perfectly good caption saying that the
      facility cost $2 billion to build and was completed in 2006.
      And second guy said he somehow thought that meant that taking
      a tour costs $2 billion (which would be obviously expensive
      just for a tour). And you have somehow misinterpreted the
      comment about the tour to be saying that the facility is
      expensive.Come on, guys. Read before you comment. Jesus.
 
        twic - 2 hours ago
        I assume the second person was joking. I have no idea what
        the first person was concerned about, unfortunately.
 
        [deleted]
 
NeoBasilisk - 1 hours ago
The US feels more like a third world country in its "response" to
climate change compared to countries like Japan
 
  anon_d - 7 minutes ago
  Tokyo is 30% of Japan's population..