GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-09) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Librem 5 Phone Funded
165 points by mike-cardwell
https://puri.sm/shop/librem-5/
___________________________________________________________________
 
maerF0x0 - 1 hours ago
Will it have a GPS?
 
mikenew - 8 minutes ago
I "bought" mine. I'm not sure what their probability of success is,
but if it's around 30% or so I'm fine with that. The world needs a
viable alternative to the big 2 mobile OSs, and even if the market
share is tiny the difference between having an alternative and not
is huge.I've been an iOS developer for years and made a comfortable
living, but it bothers me on a deep and fundamental level that my
primary communication and computing device is controlled by someone
else, and the software I'm allowed to run and allowed to distribute
is entirely decided by them. I'm willing to risk money if it helps
our chances of having an alternative.
 
chx - 2 hours ago
I trust they did their research but separating the baseband from
the CPU will be a major, major PITA.
 
greenhouse_gas - 56 minutes ago
Why don't they base their OS on Replicant?It's FOSS, Linux-based,
has apps and is Mobike-optimized.
 
  uabstraction - 25 minutes ago
  I don't know about you, but I want to get as far away from the
  whole Android ecosystem as possible.  I don't want "Linux-based."
  I want fully fledged GNU/Linux in my pocket.  I want to take
  advantage of GNOME/KDE's convergence interfaces.  I want to
  develop real Unix software and port it to a phone without
  rewriting it for cocoa touch or Android's java API.There is so
  much great software available for GNU/Linux that we have the
  potential to tap into, and many of them can be made to work on a
  5" touchscreen with a little bit of elbow grease.  Firefox OS and
  Ubuntu phones failed because they ignored the giant stack of
  software sitting right in front of us.  Purism would do well to
  leverage the software we already have and love, rather than
  wasting time designing new application models and distribution
  channels which nobody asked for in the first place.There's been a
  hole in my heart since the day the Nokia n900 was discontinued.
  I've got my fingers crossed on this one.
 
cordite - 2 minutes ago
I hope it works better than the blackphone. I could barely use it
for a year before the basic functionalities like battery life were
impractacle.
 
1001101 - 2 hours ago
> Separate mobile baseband Ok, how do we know the hardware/software
there pushes the goals of security and privacy? I2S hooked up?
(that would scare me on a design with the stated goals, but it
makes it really nice for getting good acoustics with your
mechanicals) Simply pushing app processor encrypted data over the
bearer?> i.MX Love the i.MX 6/8 APs, but I would recommend
prototyping/de-risking the power budget up front.100% open source
warms my heart.  Would love to see if this could be built.
 
lurker12390879 - 3 hours ago
To the moon!
 
comboy - 2 hours ago
I imagine they cannot afford to do their own radio chip. And that's
already enough to track you.Android does not seem to be the
problem.When going with custom OS if this phone gets any traction
then I'm pretty sure some helpful OS contributor from three-letter-
agency will add something from his heart, because by running it you
are already signaling that you are an interesting target.
 
c0smic - 38 minutes ago
Really hope purism finds success with this. An open phone platform
has been a long time coming, I hope they can learning from the
missteps of ubuntu and firefox.I like the idea of managing my phone
like I manage my computer; install whatever OS and software I want
on it. Of course, that comes with the additional effort of keeping
it well updated and working, and if this is a primary communication
device that effort becomes more urgent. But hey, I think that's
just what it takes to not be dependent on a corporation that takes
my data/info in exchange for device support.
 
madmax108 - 3 hours ago
Interesting. Does this mean that I can use my phone to install all
apps that I can on my laptop? Similar to how Ubuntu phone was in
principle.Can I apt-get install something in this (assuming
debian/ubuntu installed) or have it's own app store?Really
interesting, but so many questions unanswered about what I can do
with the phone once I buy it.
 
  ZenoArrow - 2 hours ago
  > "Does this mean that I can use my phone to install all apps
  that I can on my laptop?"Yes. Any Linux app that runs on ARM.
  Most desktop apps don't have a UI that works well on mobile, and
  some apps are pretty much a no-go just because of performance,
  but aside from that you're free to install the software you
  want.> "Can I apt-get install something in this (assuming
  debian/ubuntu installed) or have it's own app store?"Yes, you'll
  be able to use package managers. The proposed phone aims to
  support multiple distros, including Debian and Ubuntu if you want
  to use apt-get. The flagship OS for the device is Pure OS, which
  currently uses GNOME Software as its app store (I'm guessing they
  might extend it with the option to install commercial software
  before launch):https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Software
 
  chrisper - 1 hours ago
  You could try Termux on Android. It's kind of like that but not
  quite.
 
  ocdtrekkie - 3 hours ago
  It's super early here, so it's likely they don't know a lot for
  sure. It's not like they have a working reference phone even yet,
  they're playing with a system board and getting touch working
  according to the last post.I pitched in $20 to support them, but
  buying a phone I might not get that I wouldn't be able to use for
  at least a year that may or may not meet my needs at that time
  was a bit of a stretch for me. Willing to bet there are many
  others in the same boat there.
 
shmerl - 1 hours ago
Congratulations! I'm looking forward to the actual release. It's
quite hard and risky however, and if anything, previous failed
projects are an indication of how volatile all this is (like
hardware partners pulling support in the middle of the development
cycle and so on).It would be great to have a device running Linux
with native Wayland, and LTE modem separated from the CPU for
better security. I just hope they'll go with i.MX 8M so it will be
64-bit.How is etnaviv for it though? I also wonder what's the level
of OpenGL support in it. I suppose Vulkan support isn't even
started?
 
tom_mellior - 1 hours ago
This crowdfunding campaign started on August 24. It was at $750000
after a month on September 26, needed ten more days to reach a
million on October 4, and then somehow raised the remaining $500000
in five more days? This seems weird. They didn't have that much
press over this last week.I wonder if they had investors all along
and only pretended to crowdfund.(I'm not saying this is a scam or
anything. I participated.)
 
  Arathorn - 1 hours ago
  My interpretation is between some concrete evidence of actually
  being able to build this (https://puri.sm/posts/librem5-roadmap-
  to-imx8 and https://matrix.org/blog/2017/09/28/experiments-with-
  matrix-o...) and then hitting the $1M mark
  (https://puri.sm/posts/librem-5-campaign-surges-past-one-
  mill...), the campaign finally got critical mass.  These stories
  seemed to get pretty major press (e.g. top of HN).
 
  __d - 28 minutes ago
  I suspect that at first people held back, fearing that the
  project would be limited to the i.MX6 CPU, wouldn't get a
  critical mass, etc.As the funding threshold neared, confidence
  grew, and more people signed up.It might also just have taken
  people a week or two to decide to commit a bunch of money to a
  15-months away delivery ...
 
  shmerl - 1 hours ago
  They got more publicity from Gnome and KDE backing the project.
 
sexydefinesher - 3 hours ago
These are great news. We are lucky to have purism bring FOSS and
privacy to the masses in a pretty package.
 
s73ver_ - 3 hours ago
Good luck to them, but getting the funding is only a third of the
battle. Now it remains to see if they can build something that a
substantial amount of people will want to use.
 
  MrMember - 2 hours ago
  That's what's preventing me from buying in this early. I would
  love to have a phone that's open and runs actual Linux but $600
  is a lot of money for a product that doesn't exist yet and has a
  tentative ship date more than a year out.
 
  kawera - 2 hours ago
  It will probably be a niche product but, regardless, I'm super
  happy we have an alternative to the current duopoly.
 
    s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
    Well, we don't yet. But I do wish them the best of luck in
    creating one.
 
JepZ - 2 hours ago
Is there any special reason why they choose Matrix instead of XMPP?
 
  aloisdg - 1 hours ago
  matrix about xmpp:What is the difference between Matrix and
  XMPP?The Matrix team used XMPP (Openfire, ejabberd, spectrum,
  asmack, XMPPFramework) for IM before starting to experiment with
  open HTTP APIs as an alternative in around 2012. The main issues
  with XMPP that drove us in this direction as of 2012 were:- Not
  particularly web-friendly - you can?t easily speak XMPP from a
  web browser. N.B. Nowadays you have options like XMPP-FTW and
  Stanza.io that help loads with letting browsers talk XMPP- Single
  logical server per MUC is a single point of control and
  availability. MUCs can be distributed over multiple physical
  servers, but they still sit behind a single logical JID and
  domain. FMUC improves this with a similar approach to Matrix, but
  as of Oct 2015 there are no open source implementations. The MIX
  XMPP extension also aims to address this limitation.- History
  synchronisation is very much a second class citizen feature-
  Bridging to other protocols and defragmenting existing
  communication apps and networks is very much a second class
  citizen feature- Stanzas aren?t framed or reliably delivered
  without extensions. See wiki.xmpp.org for an XMPP take on this-
  Multiple device support is limited. Carbons and MAM aim to
  resolve this- Baseline feature set is so minimal that
  fragmentation of features between clients and servers is common,
  especially as interoperability profiles for features have fallen
  behind (as of July 2015)- No strong identity system (i.e. no
  standard E2E PKI, unless you count X.509 certs, which are
  questionable)- Not particularly well designed for mobile use
  cases: push; bandwidth-efficient transports. Since the time of
  writing a Push XEP has appeared, and wiki.xmpp.org states that
  XMPP is usable over a 9600bps + 30s latency link.This said, the
  whole area of XMPP vs Matrix is quite subjective. Rather than
  fighting over which open interoperable communication standard
  works the best, we should just collaborate and bridge everything
  together. The more federation and interoperability the better.We
  think of Matrix and XMPP as being quite different; at its core
  Matrix can be thought of as an eventually consistent global JSON
  db with an HTTP API and pubsub semantics - whilst XMPP can be
  thought of as a message passing protocol. You can use them both
  to build chat systems; you can use them both to build pubsub
  systems; each comes with different tradeoffs. Matrix has a
  deliberately extensive ?kitchen sink? baseline of functionality;
  XMPP has a deliberately minimal baseline set of functionality. If
  XMPP does what you need it to do, then we?re genuinely happy for
  you :) Meanwhile, rather than competing, an XMPP Bridge like
  Skaverat?s xmpptrix beta or jfred?s matrix-xmpp-bridge or
  Matrix.org?s own purple-matrix has potential to let both
  environments coexist and make the most of each other?s
  benefits.source: https://matrix.org/docs/guides/faq.html#what-is-
  the-differen...
 
  subway - 2 hours ago
  It feels like over the past few years most of the XMPP crowd has
  shifted to Matrix.XMPP failed to get BOSH out the door quickly
  enough to maintain traction.
 
foota - 3 hours ago
Seems like really low funding for what they're aiming for
 
  JepZ - 2 hours ago
  Yeah and the project plan for PureOS >II looks interesting too.
  Lets do everything, at the same time!Nevertheless, I wish them
  luck and hope they succeed.
 
  platinumrad - 2 hours ago
  Yeah, I'm somewhat worried about this as well as 1.5 million is
  not a lot considering that they actually have to ship phones in
  the end and can't just pour it all into R&D. I'm assuming that
  they'll be using mostly commodity hardware (i.MX 8M SoC plus
  Alibaba-tier chassis, lcd, capacitive layer, etc.) but even then
  they still have to put everything together and create a
  deliverable product with reasonably workable software, although I
  expect that they plan on leaning heavily on the KDE/GNOME/Debian
  communities. Probably going to flip a coin later this week to
  determine whether I'm going to back this or not.
 
    JonFish85 - 2 hours ago
    $1.5m, and seemingly a team of somewhere between 18 and 27
    people, they're going to need more funding. If they're paying
    $5k/person/mo (assume for now this includes things like taxes
    and overhead), that's one year's worth of money. On top of
    this, they have to cover things like FCC certifications, fees
    for getting manufacturing rolling and all the other fun stuff
    that comes with shipping physical product.
 
      ZenoArrow - 2 hours ago
      $1.5m does seem like a low target for a crowdfunded
      smartphone, but it's worth bearing in mind that the salaries
      of those involved will not be propped up solely by a single
      device. Purism already sell a range of
      laptops:https://puri.sm/products/
 
        JepZ - 2 hours ago
        Wow, their laptops look great. Not cheap, but fairly
        priced. I hope they will still offer updated versions when
        I have to replace my XPS.
 
      1001101 - 1 hours ago
      I'm not sure what their plans are, but a good punt would be
      do the form factor Wi-Fi only and use an external, optional
      COTS hotspot as their 'baseband.'  I think their goals would
      be met, and they could realize some power/cost savings (with
      the lower cost Wi-Fi-only SKU).
 
kepano - 2 hours ago
This is an admirable effort, but unless tens of thousands of units
are put into production it will be very difficult to get the
attention of even the smallest Chinese OEMs. It appears they've
pre-sold less than 2000 units. I wonder if it would be more
fruitful to work from an existing phone with solid build quality
and simplifying the process of jailbreaking it and installing FOSS
on it.
 
  j45 - 1 hours ago
  Having the ability to create the first 2 or 3 waves of prototypes
  is nothing small. iPhone 1-3 needed improvement, similar to the
  galaxy note.Maybe there's a Oneplus angle here where they can
  start small and lean with a partner.
 
  wvh - 1 hours ago
  Jailbreaking and installing FOSS like Jolla is doing with
  Sailfish on Xperia X right this week, with some help from Sony
  Open Devices.Still, it would be nice to have some hope do be able
  to do it without relying on manufacturers' goodwill... If ARM
  gets sufficiently commoditised so it's cheap (both time and
  money) enough for smaller players to create hardware, surely
  there must be enough open-source and/or privacy-oriented folks
  around to come up with a profitable product?
 
  chx - 2 hours ago
  Separating the CPU and the baseband is going to be a challenge
  when building this device and impossible on any other device.
  But, if you want a libre phone then you must because the baseband
  will be a black box that's unavoidable.
 
rallycarre - 1 hours ago
Doesn't matter. They'll be a gov't backdoor in either the hardware
or the software so you might as well get an android phone and load
copperhead os on it as it will have the same result.
 
  ZenoArrow - 1 hours ago
  The Librem laptops come with hardware killswitches. The aim is to
  do the same with the Librem 5. Kind of hard for governments to
  spy on you using a microphone, camera, etc... without
  electricity.
 
legulere - 2 hours ago
How to fund a good user interface and ecosystem when even Microsoft
failed at that (see other article also on the top today)
 
  ZenoArrow - 2 hours ago
  They don't have to fund that. The idea is to make use of the work
  of the open-source community. The main contribution, software-
  wise will be pushing forward Matrix, pushing forward open
  drivers, and designing a platform that makes it easier for others
  to build apps.Plasma Mobile is one example of an existing open-
  source project that aligns with their goals:https://plasma-
  mobile.org/Ubuntu Touch (now maintained by UBports) is another
  good option:https://ubports.com/
 
paxy - 2 hours ago
Looking through their website I'm curious why what they're aiming
for can't be accomplished with the Android Open Source Project
(AOSP) or a fork of it, rather than trying to build yet another
smartphone ecosystem from scratch?
 
  bo1024 - 1 hours ago
  A huge point of their approach is the hardware.
 
  subway - 2 hours ago
  AOSP still relies on a bunch of hacked together BSPs with nasty
  binary blobs and never-ever-gonna-get-mainlined device specific
  kernel patches.
 
    scintill76 - 2 hours ago
    They could release open-source and mainlined versions of that
    stuff then. I guess they wouldn't because they probably
    consider Android incompatible with their other goals.
 
      subway - 2 hours ago
      The work they're doing is effectively that. There's nothing
      stopping Android from running on top of the kernel work
      they're doing. Think of their work as developing an open
      source BSP.It looks like much of the UI work is being punted
      to whatever phone ui the KDE and Gnome projects churn out.An
      Android userland will likely ship in parallel or shortly
      after. The bits AOSP handles are by and large boring and
      don't need to be futzed with.
 
    paxy - 2 hours ago
    Random BSPs don't matter considering they're releasing their
    own hardware, and can support that as much or as little as they
    want on top of AOSP.
 
diminish - 2 hours ago
We really need a phone for hackers no matter how small the market
is.  I hope that's Librem this time after Neo, Ubuntu, FirefoxOS.
 
  mortenjorck - 2 hours ago
  It's honestly very difficult to imagine how a small group, no
  matter how talented and driven, can possibly succeed where open
  source giants Canonical and Mozilla couldn't.The only possibility
  I can imagine is that by leaning into a niche market, embracing
  low-volume but also the community that goes with it, rather than
  engaging in a quixotic quest to become a viable competitor to the
  established duopoly, Librem can become sustainable along the
  lines of niche laptop manufacturer System76. That doesn't seem
  entirely unreasonable, and it would be pretty cool.
 
    sjs382 - 2 hours ago
    A "success" for this group might look something like "5k
    devices sold", compared to a "success" for Canonical or Mozilla
    being larger, like "5+% of the market" or something similar.
 
    romaniv - 1 hours ago
    >It's honestly very difficult to imagine how a small group, no
    matter how talented and driven, can possibly succeed where open
    source giants Canonical and Mozilla couldn't.How many people
    worked on Xerox Alto? They had to do everything from scratch,
    including bootstrapping their own tools and they had far worse
    computing capabilities/hardware available to them at the time.
 
    j45 - 1 hours ago
    Respectfully, success isn't about technical ability alone in
    the mobile, timing is a big factor.Palm's webOS is an html/js
    based mobile phone OS that predated the JS based excitement.For
    example, if there was a device that focused on running
    progressive web apps well, there would be a market today than
    compared to the past when horsepower wasn't at the level it is
    at now.The flip side is also being able to run these sorts of
    operating systems on more devices.I use my phone more and more
    for computer replacement tasks on Android. Would be neat to be
    able to run the odd android app in a container, etc.
 
    ralmidani - 2 hours ago
    This. Free Software doesn't need to be ubiquitous or even
    dominant. Most end-users don't want Free Software right now. As
    long as the Librem 5 becomes feasible, we can worry about
    market share later.
 
      bduerst - 2 hours ago
      Isn't market share part of making the phone feasible?
      Economies of scale and all that.
 
        microcolonel - 2 hours ago
        The costs of developing and commercializing the components
        in smartphones are borne by the Android, automotive, and
        other high performance embedded markets. They just need to
        make it viable enough to assemble the components and put
        them in an enclosure.So it's perfectly feasible to have a
        small market device like this if the market price covers
        the cost of buying chipsets off the shelf, and assembling
        them.
 
        ralmidani - 1 hours ago
        Yes. However, we need to have a modest definition of
        "success".
 
    shmerl - 1 hours ago
    Success in this case means having a choice to buy such device
    and run a free OS on it.
 
      ocdtrekkie - 7 minutes ago
      "The choice to buy such device" seems to be the hard part for
      every previous attempt at an open source OS. Almost all of
      them have been "buy a Nexus/OnePlus/etc. and flash it
      yourself" or have had limited models that are nearly
      impossible to get a hold of.In my case, the problem actually
      doubles, because I'm on Verizon. Verizon IS required to
      support any compatible device, but few niche developers are
      willing to submit their devices for certification. :/ I
      suspect there would be a significant value if someone could
      get a free software-based module submitted to
      https://opendevelopment.verizonwireless.com/design-and-
      build...
 
    Arathorn - 1 hours ago
    If the goals are relatively modest (e.g. a low bar of selling
    ~10K handsets), and the project is well scoped (e.g. don't try
    to be a me-too Android & iOS alternative, but focus purely on
    secure communication & web browsing), and if it builds on the
    better bits of FOSS that came from previous projects (Maemo,
    Meego, Sailfish, FFOS, Ubuntu Touch, etc)... I think this one
    stands a chance.  (disclaimer: I'm working on the Matrix side
    of it).
 
      khed - 9 minutes ago
      I am excited for the phone but I don't get having matrix as
      the messaging app. I don't see the value in matrix.
      Encryption is not on by default, which is unacceptable in a
      modern messaging app. It leaks metadata like a seive. None of
      my friends or co-workers on it. It isn't decentralized
      enough.They should just use briar. It hides metadata, it's
      encrypted, it's peer to peer. It's biggest downsides are no
      file transfer, no iOS client, no offline messaging.Or better
      yet someone should develop an app based on one of the newer
      concepts like vuvuzela/alpenhorn or loopix.
 
      Arathorn - 1 hours ago
      also, a really exciting thing here is proving that it is
      viable to build a FOSS-friendly hardware supply chain.
 
    noonespecial - 1 hours ago
    Every year it gets easier. Barring bizarre regulatory hurdles
    it seems almost inevitable. With carriers like freedompop
    coming onto the scene, its starting to get pretty easy to pop a
    speaker, a mic, and a sim-slot onto a raspi and having a
    "phone".
 
    lurker12390879 - 2 hours ago
    Canonical and Mozilla are too busy virtue signaling and selling
    their users out for profit.
 
  s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
  Do we? I mean, a netbook isn't that big, and it doesn't have the
  added requirement of always needing to work as a primary
  communications device.
 
  ColanR - 1 hours ago
  One of these is what I'd go for.  Build the phone out of a
  raspberry pi.https://hackaday.io/project/19035-zerophone-a
  -raspberry-pi-s...http://www.davidhunt.ie/piphone-a-raspberry-pi-
  based-smartph...
 
    jononor - 1 hours ago
    Why? The RPi isn't anywhere close to open hardware? Might as
    well use a devkit straight out of China...
 
      ZenoArrow - 1 hours ago
      > "The RPi isn't anywhere close to open hardware?"The RPi is
      the one of the most open of all the SBC (Single Board
      Computers) currently on the market:https://anholt.github.io/t
      wivc4/https://github.com/christinaa/rpi-open-firmwareWhat
      that says about other SBC, I'll leave up to you to decide.
 
Tepix - 2 hours ago
Great news!I?m wondering in what parts the Librem 5 will be more
open than a Nexus running CopperheadOS.
 
  ZenoArrow - 2 hours ago
  > "I?m wondering in what parts the Librem 5 will be more open
  than a Nexus running CopperheadOS."The device drivers for one.
  I'm not aware of any Nexus device with open-source device
  drivers.
 
pacala - 1 hours ago
Somewhat related, does anyone know of a solution to run
https://signal.org and nothing else? 5 out of 7 days I don't really
need a smart phone, I only need the signal app.Working to break my
smart phone addiction.
 
  maerF0x0 - 58 minutes ago
  maybe build one w/ raspberry pi?
 
  j45 - 1 hours ago
  You could run a tablet data plan sim  (data only) in a mobile
  phone.