GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-09) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
GM to buy LIDAR sensor-tech firm Strobe
116 points by mudil
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-strobe-m-a-gm/gm-to-buy-senso...
___________________________________________________________________
 
deepnotderp - 5 hours ago
Very interesting and possibly scary for LIDAR startups (e.g.
Luminar). If I'm not mistaken, the Strobe LIDAR is a flash LIDAR?
 
  deepnotderp - 3 hours ago
  Apparently it's actually frequency modulation
  lidarhttps://spectrum.ieee.org/cars-that-
  think/transportation/sel...
 
jakarta - 6 hours ago
Kyle Vogt blog post on the deal: https://medium.com/kylevogt/how-
were-solving-the-lidar-probl...
 
  Fricken - 6 hours ago
  It's also worth reading Kyle's blog post from last week. Cruise
  is doing some stuff that nobody else can do. Not even
  Waymo:https://medium.com/kylevogt/why-testing-self-driving-cars-
  in...GM right now is the most vertically integrated of all the
  companies making meaningful progress on Robotaxis. They have a
  dedicated assembly line set up building off the Chevy Bolt
  platform, and intend to have 'thousands' of them on the road
  before the end of 2018. They're building their own ride hailing
  app, called Cruise anywhere, currently only available to GM
  employees. They've got On-star, which provides in-house expertise
  with connected car and vehicle diagnostic services. GM's Maven
  subsidiary offers car sharing services.But when Robotaxis really
  proliferate fleet management infrastructure will be very
  important. Apple and Waymo have made partnered with Hertz and
  Avis respectively, but General Motors can utilize the real estate
  and expertise of it's existing network of dealerships, which can
  save them from a great deal of capital investment as Robotaxis
  dissemintate.Before last December there wasn't a whole lot to be
  known about Cruise's progress, but since then it's just been one
  reason after another to be getting excited about what they're
  doing.
 
    RandallBrown - 5 hours ago
    I never thought about car companies being able to use their
    dealerships for their fleets. That will actually be a pretty
    huge advantage in smaller towns where there won't be enough
    business to have the cars driving continuously.
 
    koiz - 5 hours ago
    Aren't they still working out the actual software... To make
    all of this work...hardware wise they are ahead but people
    around here have been tooting the GM horn just because they can
    produce cars.
 
    saosebastiao - 6 hours ago
    That article was interesting. I've been a truck driver, with
    recurring jobs throughout San Francisco, and can attest to how
    nerve-racking it can be. In order to drive trucks there
    successfully, you have to know the roads really well, as your
    GPS is often worthless (so many different rules, changing
    conditions, unpredictable drivers/cyclists/pedestrians, as well
    as truck-specific restrictions). From a pedestrian safety
    perspective, I really appreciate that there are companies that
    are prioritizing San Francisco as a testing ground.I still
    think Seattle is more difficult to drive in. The streets are
    narrower (most residential streets are two way, but only wide
    enough for one car width, requiring drivers to negotiate with
    other drivers on how to proceed). There are far more 3,5,6 and
    even 7 way intersections[0]. Just as many hills as San
    Francisco, but the several poorly-intersecting street grids
    give the hills much worse visibility. And I'm willing to bet we
    have way more construction than San Francisco.[0]
    https://vimeo.com/124481186
 
      dsfyu404ed - 4 hours ago
      >I really appreciate that there are companies that are
      prioritizing San Francisco as a testing ground.I think it has
      more to do with them not having a snowball's chance in hell
      in Boston, Rome or New Delhi (in increasing order of
      difficulty).We haven't even seen a driver-less car floor it
      on a green to make a left before the opposing traffic moves.
 
        muraiki - 3 hours ago
        In Pittsburgh this is known as the "Pittsburgh Left",
        although there are various other cities and states that lay
        claim to the name!
        :)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittsburgh_left
 
          astrange - 2 hours ago
          SF has plenty of unprotected left turns against traffic.
          I haven't seen a driverless car outside Mountain View,
          but hopefully they actually make those turns and don't
          just get stuck?That said I remember the occasional drive
          straight down a cliff in Pittsburgh beating even the SF
          hills.
 
        ihoshjd - 33 minutes ago
        Yeah, certainly one of the key ways pedestrians are killed,
        entilted drivers who can't be bothered to wait.Unprotected
        left turns are one of major ways pedestrians are murdered
        by careless drivers.
 
    zitterbewegung - 5 hours ago
    They also have invested in Lyft for $500 Million USD.  See
    https://blog.lyft.com/posts/lyft-1billion-gm
 
      Fricken - 4 hours ago
      Vogt did an interview with Forbes earlier this summer, in
      which he implied that the Lyft investment was done on the
      initiative of some other arm of General Motors, and that
      Cruise doesn't need no stinking rideshare partnership. I
      guess we'll see how that plays
      out.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beaaidqx4vA
 
        zitterbewegung - 4 hours ago
        Isn't it just a hedge if Cruise doesn't work out? Or GM for
        that matter?
 
    apohn - 5 hours ago
    >...but General Motors can utilize the real estate and
    expertise of it's existing network of dealerships, which can
    save them from a great deal of capital investment as Robotaxis
    dissemintate.I was involved in a project at a major US auto
    maker where they wanted to utilize spare capacity at the
    dealers on something similar to what you are discussing.  In
    this case, we would pay the dealers to utilize that capacity.In
    some states, the dealer networks are large, politically very
    influential, and are not inclined to allow anything that will
    disrupt the status quo of selling and leasing cars.  They
    absolutely had their hands around the throat of the auto maker
    and forced us to go another route just because they saw what we
    were trying to do could possibly change their income flow in
    some small way.In theory, GM has the infrastructure and is
    making the right acquisitions.  In practice the vast majority
    of the company is entrenched in selling and leasing cars and
    many people in the company don't have the imagination to see
    the world differently.  GM has a lot of internal and external
    politics to overcome before they are successful with autonomous
    cars and Robotaxis.
 
      vvanders - 4 hours ago
      Yeah, additionally dealerships are commonly multi-regional
      run under different names so finding competition within a
      brand can be difficult.Generally you tend to have to go
      150-200mi to get to a different parent company.
 
vkuruthers - 3 hours ago
Anyone have any info on how the Strobe Lidar(s) compare to Velodyne
systems?
 
rikelmens - 1 hours ago
This guy seems to be the master mind behind GM's explosive growth
in this area: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ostojic/
 
  Fricken - 19 minutes ago
  Can I ask why you say that? Not that I disbelieve you, but there
  isn't very much public information about Sasha Ostojic to go off.
 
mhb - 3 hours ago
In a document prepared for a Korean trade delegation to Silicon
Valley in May, and obtained by IEEE Spectrum, Strobe claimed that
its prototype lidar had a range of 300 meters, a processing time of
fewer than 45 milliseconds, and cost less than $100. It also noted
that its first product would be commercially available in the
spring of 2018.https://spectrum.ieee.org/cars-that-
think/transportation/sel...
 
  joshvm - 55 minutes ago
  Probably fabrication cost, given that it's a prototype. It's a
  research project so their estimates are a bit pie in the sky
  right now. Until it's mass produced it'll be expensive, but who
  knows, maybe GM will pull it off.Notable that this is an FMCW
  system. Very few commercial players use frequency modulation,
  they all use either AM or pulsed lasers.Rep rate is not so good.
  45 ms = 20Hz maximum. That's poor compared to Velodyne (15kHz or
  so per transceiver) or surveying stations which can push 1MHz.
  Even hobbyist systems like the Scanse manage 4kHz.  I'd guess
  that the problem is, in part, because you need to chirp for a
  certain amount of time. Pulsed systems often use avalanche diodes
  that trigger from relatively few photons.It's 1D, so you've still
  got to scan it which is bad for robustness. I'm more excited for
  solid state LIDAR that uses beam shaping (or however they're
  doing it) to scan without moving parts.The range is good though,
  FMCW is great for that (and the accuracy should be good too). The
  main advantage of FMCW is that you can still get the high
  accuracy of AMCW systems (i.e. at a lower bandwith than direct
  time of flight), but you don't have the phase ambiguity problem
  that AM does.
 
  was_boring - 1 hours ago
  Is this retail, wholesale or cost to make prices?As someone who
  works on their own cars, electric and self-driving cars have me
  scared that it will not be possible in the future.
 
    Shivetya - 1 hours ago
    I figure a great deal of this will be standardized with modules
    you swap out like you do a water pump and sensors like light
    assemblies. plus it is not like all these older cars are going
    anywhere.people vastly over estimate how fast self driving cars
    will arrive and just as much the electric only revolution
 
Animats - 4 hours ago
Strobe seems to be using some very advanced physics. Here's a paper
on quantum LIDAR.[1] The semiconductor technology is exotic.[2] The
detectors in the research papers require cooling to superconducting
temperatures, but apparently that can be overcome. It's amazing
this technology is making it to the automotive environment this
fast.[1] https://arxiv.org/pdf/1305.6627.pdf [2]
http://www.princetonlightwave.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01...
 
post_break - 4 hours ago
I can't wait until LIDAR stuff ends up in junk yards from totaled
cars in the future. I'm sure there will be a bunch of amazing uses
for it.
 
  kileywm - 4 hours ago
  If autonomous vehicles are a success, then there may be
  surprisingly few totaled cars in the future, compared to what we
  see today. I'm excited for that and agree with you that some
  really cool stuff can come out of the salvage of the future.It's
  interesting to think about the situations where even the most
  sophisticated sensors and software may be unable prevent an
  accident that can total the vehicle. Animal crossings,
  catastrophic vehicle part failure, surprise road debris, etc...
 
  bitL - 3 hours ago
  You can already buy LiDAR for $250 and RGB-D cameras for even
  less...
 
  jamiequint - 4 hours ago
  If autonomous vehicles become a success you'll just be able to
  buy LIDARs for super cheap because the market for them will drive
  prices down significantly.
 
    freehunter - 3 hours ago
    You'd think so, but there are a lot of things that have a big
    commercial market but are basically non-existent in the
    consumer space unless you're willing to rip them out of
    commercial products. As just one example, you can buy one 7"
    HDMI touchscreen (just the screen) for $100 shipped [1] or for
    the same money you can buy two Amazon Fire tablets with the
    same size screen but twice the resolution, plus it has a full
    mobile SOC with a quad core processor and a camera and I mean
    it's a full tablet. Not just the screen. And it's half the
    price.Even if Amazon is losing money on each Fire sold, I can't
    imagine they're losing that much. They're getting those screens
    for a hell of a lot cheaper than I can, and better quality too.
    I imagine LCD touchscreens have a far bigger consumer demand
    than LIDAR sensors ever will, so the dream of cheap LIDAR
    sensors from Sparkfun will forever remain a dream. Grabbing one
    from a junk yard will be the better option.[1]
    https://www.adafruit.com/product/2407[2] https://www.amazon.com
    /All-New-Tablet-Alexa-Display-Black/dp...
 
      icebraining - 2 hours ago
      Adafruit is notoriously pricy. Here's one for $54 with free
      shipping: http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-7-Capacitive-Touch-
      Screen-LCD-Di...But those include a "beefy DVI/HDMI decoder",
      which the tablet doesn't need, since it can dump the raw
      image directly from the graphics chip. You can probably find
      a cheaper version if you can do the same.EDIT: To corroborate
      my last point, a replacement screen for a Nexus 7 is just $22
      (free shipping), and includes digitizer.
 
        freehunter - 7 minutes ago
        Similarly, I'd imagine a LIDAR sensor built for a Cruise
        car to be $30 wholesale, $40 if you buy the exact same
        thing as an aftermarket replacement part, and $150 if you
        buy a standalone LIDAR sensor with the parts you need to
        actually use it.Because a replacement Nexus 7 screen isn't
        going to natively interface with my Raspberry Pi, and
        neither will a Cruise LIDAR sensor. A $30 part that needs a
        $20 interface isn't any better than a $50 part that
        includes the interface.
 
      ksk - 3 hours ago
      Well buying anything in bulk will still be cheaper !
 
  cr0sh - 3 hours ago
  If you want to play with this stuff today, comparatively simpler
  2D scanning LIDAR can be found cheaply on Ebay.You can usually
  find used SICK units there for well under $500.00 USD (I once
  scored one unit for $250.00); even when they look in terrible
  condition they usually function fine (they are designed for
  industrial environments and usage). These old units have a
  downside in that they use older serial comms (RS-232 and RS-422)
  that can be tricky to get going; for one unit I had, I had to
  send it back to SICK to get it reset to RS-232; it was originally
  set to RS-422 (faster), but to go back to the slower standard
  required a converter, which I didn't want to spend the money on
  if the unit didn't work properly. Then - on top of all that - I
  had to set up a Window NT 4.0 workstation to use the software.
  Plus they require a 24 volt DC power supply (great for mobility
  chair robots, though!). Once I got it running, though -
  everything worked well.They are also large - as in coffee pot
  sized (in fact, they are kinda "affectionately" termed this), and
  made of aluminum casting and other metals that make them
  relatively heavy. This also makes them very robust, and are
  perfect for medium and larger-scale robots (no desktop rovers
  here - these sensors work well on robots the size of 24 VDC
  mobility chair bases and larger); for instance, if you look up
  Stanley from the Darpa Grand Challenge 2005 competition, you'll
  see five of the units facing forward on top of the vehicle. Each
  scans a line out many meters in front of the sensor, with a
  field-of-view (FOV) of about 180 degrees. It's like a radar
  sweep. As the platform vehicle moves forward, if the sensor is
  angled down, you can build up a height-map of the terrain in
  front of the platform. It is also possible to mount the sensor on
  a turntable to rotate it while it is oriented vertically, and
  scan a 3D volume, though at a much slower rate.The other low-cost
  possibility is to purchase a surplus Neato robot vacuum LIDAR
  sensor. These units are also 2D, but use a parallax shift method
  of determining distance, kinda like explained here:https://sites.
  google.com/site/todddanko/home/webcam_laser_ra...Instead of a
  webcam, a 2D line-element imager is used. The whole contraption
  is then mounted on a turntable with a slip-ring system (for
  signals/power) to scan a 360 degree view around the sensor - the
  whitepaper behind the sensor can be
  found:http://www.robotshop.com/media/files/PDF/revolds-
  whitepaper....These sensors - as pulls or replacements - can be
  found on Ebay for about $100.00 USD each, and are much smaller
  (desktop rover sized), but have a limitation in that they don't
  work well outdoors (sunlight swamps the sensor) - but given the
  device they were meant to be used on, an indoor vacuum robot,
  that wasn't a concern.Another option people have tried has been
  to get a low-cost 4-6 conductor slip-ring off Ebay (cheap), then
  build a similar motor-driven scanning system like the Neato lidar
  uses. For the actual sensor, a "LIDAR-Lite" module is used, which
  are relatively inexpensive (more than a Neato module, less than a
  SICK). They also have a longer range, and work well outdoors in
  sunlight. These have been mostly "homebrew" systems, so googling
  for such projects will be the best way to find them, but I've
  given enough info here that you probably won't need much hand-
  holding to implement something similar.A recent off-the-shelf
  option that has become available, and is still fairly low-cost,
  is the Scanse Sweep:http://scanse.io/At a price of $350.00 USD,
  it isn't as cheap as a Neato sensor, but it does work better than
  that unit while still being small with longer distance
  capability, and is much cheaper than a new SICK LIDAR
  unit.Finally, a form of LIDAR that is somewhat like a combination
  of computer vision coupled with lasers, this project has always
  been of interest to
  me:http://www.seattlerobotics.org/encoder/200110/vision.htmIt is
  similar to the old webcam LIDAR I pointed out earlier, but uses a
  laser to create a line (cylindrical lens element), which by
  displacement viewed in the camera, and some simple trig, can lead
  to a form 2D and 3D scene reconstruction.The original unit
  described used a standard NTSC camera and a basic detection
  circuit, but today one could potentially use a high-resolution
  web camera, and a laser pointer with a line diffraction grating,
  plus OpenCV to do the detection work. It is similar in principle
  to the simpler 3D turntable scanners out there used for 3D
  printing and model capture, if you need another example.So - I
  guess all I can say is that if you are interested in this stuff,
  there are many ways to play with it today, without having to wait
  for future junkyard finds. While I agree that such sensors will
  be neat to play with, and will only come down further in price as
  they become more ubiquitous for manufacturers, you don't have to
  wait...
 
    joshvm - 1 hours ago
    Your last example is a standard laser triangulation rig.
    They're extremely simple to build and give excellent accuracy.
    Here's an example system I was involved with for cast steel:
    https://doi.org/10.1109/CRV.2016.55The pedant in me wants to
    point out that laser triangulation has nothing to do with
    LIDAR, even though it's commonly lumped in. It's basically a
    parallax measurement, whereas LIDAR refers explicitly to time
    of flight (either direct or by proxy from phase/frequency
    offset).Mostly they're used for profiling on conveyor-based
    systems - anything where the target moves underneath the
    stripe. The downside is usually a big trade off with accuracy
    and depth of field; and usually their usable range is poor (>
    5m and you're struggling and have eye safety problems). You can
    buy nm-precision systems, but they only work within a range of
    a few cm. Also the triangulation angle is important - the
    further away you go, the wider your laser-camera baseline needs
    to be to retain accuracy.
 
  csours - 4 hours ago
  If only iPhones used LIDAR...
 
balsam - 6 hours ago
I gather that cheap quantum LIDAR[1] is their edge. Anybody care to
provide more details ;)?[1]https://www.quora.com/What-is-a-quantum-
LiDAR
 
syntaxing - 4 hours ago
Anyone care to explain the technological situation of Cruise? I
feel like I read mix messages all the time about them. Some say
that Cruise is just putting up smoke and mirrors while others make
it seem like they're the closest thing to level 4/5 autonomy
compared to anyone else. I'm super curious where they actually
stand in terms of technology.
 
  ChuckMcM - 2 hours ago
  Heh, that would be inside information would it not? If nothing
  else, the Waymo v. Uber lawsuit shows how hotly contested self
  driving technology is, and LIDAR technology in particular.I've
  built a number of mobile robots over the years, and watched many
  others build them as well as part of a robotics club. One truism
  is that most robotics problems are pretty easy given ideal
  sensors and sensors for every variable :-). When I started
  building robots I quickly understood that 'sensor fusion' is more
  about trying to tease reality out of a very noisy cloud of data
  than it is AI or fancy software. I spent a month trying to get a
  robot to go precisely straight so that my dead reckoning
  algorithm would work.
 
    syntaxing - 49 minutes ago
    True, it would be pretty awesome if Cruise had some of their
    code open sourced to have a peek at their technology. I was
    looking at Google's Cartographer and it's pretty neat to see
    some of their SLAM work. It would be nice to see something
    equivalent from Cruise that shows what they're capable of
    without revealing all of their tricks.
 
      ChuckMcM - 17 minutes ago
      I don't disagree, but you did see where Levandowski got $120
      MILLION DOLLAR BONUS from Google right? There are literally
      billions of dollars of investment risk riding on the outcome
      of self driving coding and so nobody in a 'company' context
      would be likely to be motivated to share anything at all
      about how they were going about it. It would be like asking
      folks who wrote lottery software to open source their PRNG
      implementation so that people could see how cool their
      technology was :-). The brief upside of 'coolness' is
      massively outweighed by the major downside of 'used this
      against you and cost you millions.' right?
 
  maxerickson - 4 hours ago
  The problem is that outsiders aren't going to have a clear
  picture of the actual state of each implementation.The blog post
  linked in https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15435063 sure
  makes it sound like they are making serious progress on the hard
  problems.
 
    Animats - 2 hours ago
    The problem is that outsiders aren't going to have a clear
    picture of the actual state of each implementation.The CA DMV
    autonomous vehicle reports of accidents and disconnects are the
    closest thing available to objective data right now.  Waymo is
    way ahead on disconnects. Cruise is getting rear-ended a lot
    lately. Google used to get that a lot, but they seem to have
    gotten past that.(The main compatibility problem with
    autonomous vehicles so far is being rear-ended. The typical
    situation is that the autonomous vehicle advances into an
    intersection, detects some good reason to stop like cross-
    traffic previously occluded, stops, and gets rear-ended.  The
    accel/decel profile for entering occluded situations may have
    to be made more compatible with human behavior to get the human
    drivers behind to behave properly. This isn't a big problem;
    damage in those collisions is very low.)