GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-03) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Ponzi Schemes Using Virtual Currencies (2014) [pdf]
64 points by fludlight
https://www.sec.gov/investor/alerts/ia_virtualcurrencies.pdf
ngopher.com
___________________________________________________________________
 
arno_v - 2 hours ago
Would be interesting if they would give examples of ICOs or other
crypto related investments which turned out to be Ponzi schemes or
fraud.
 
  fludlight - 2 hours ago
  Investor Alert: Public Companies Making ICO-Related Claims [1]SEC
  Exposes Two Initial Coin Offerings Purportedly Backed by Real
  Estate and Diamonds [2] [3]SEC Issues Investigative Report
  Concluding DAO Tokens, a Digital Asset, Were Securities [4]
  [5]SEC v.  Trendon T. Shavers and Bitcoin Savings and Trust
  [6]SEC v. Garza, GAW Miners, and ZenMiner [7][1]
  https://www.sec.gov/oiea/investor-alerts-and-
  bulletins/ia_ic...[2] https://www.sec.gov/news/press-
  release/2017-185-0[3]
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2017/comp-
  pr2017-1...[4] https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2017-131[5]
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/investreport/34-81207.pdf[6]
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2013/comp-
  pr2013-1...[7]
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/complaints/2015/comp23415.pdf
 
SippinLean - 3 hours ago
Seems that most of there are examples of fraud instead of a Ponzi
specifically. They list a single example of using Bitcoins as part
of a Ponzi scheme, but no examples of ICOs being Ponzi schemes.
Based on OP's submission immediately prior I believe this is what
they were trying to suggest.
 
  joe_the_user - 2 hours ago
  Well they say: "We are concerned that the rising use of virtual
  currencies in the global marketplace may entice fraudsters to
  lure investors into Ponzi and other schemes in which these
  currencies are used to facilitate fraudulent, or simply
  fabricated, investments or transactions."Which reasonably
  straight forward.
 
whataretensors - 2 hours ago
"No minimum investor qualifications. Most legitimate private
investment opportunities require you to be an accredited investor.
You should be highly skeptical of investment opportunities that do
not ask about your salary or net worth."This is a ridiculous
regulation that prohibits class mobility as software eats the
world.  Apparently being middle class means you are too stupid to
realize you are being scammed, but if you are rich you get first
pick.
 
  whataretensors - 2 hours ago
  To further elaborate - a young student putting in $1000 in
  facebook seed round would now be a millionaire.  Not unthinkable
  for someone like a young Warren Buffet.  The government has
  successfully regulated the future to the top 1%, while claiming
  it's for the public good.
 
    sharemywin - 2 hours ago
     Title IV (Regulation A+) of the JOBS Act
 
    mitchellst - 2 hours ago
    OK sure, but it assumes that young student would be able to
    discriminate a money-making investment from a money-losing
    one-- something the best VC's in the business, who vet tech
    deals all day every day, struggle to do.Imagine you repeal all
    accredited investment regs overnight. Which of these seems
    likely:- everyone in america invests $1000 in a future
    facebook, ten years later we're a nation of millionaires.- 10%
    of the middle class (a huge number of people) wholly or
    partially cashes out retirement funds to put too much money
    into speculative early stage startups chasing fantastic
    returns. They lose it. Kids lose college funds, adults lose
    retirement funds, and we / society / government has to pick up
    the tab when such people get too old to work.The point is, it's
    easy to attack these regulations as a barrier to opportunity
    and an unfair impediment to your right to do whatever you want
    with your own money. That's fair as far as it goes, but you
    also have to grapple with the real consequences of changing the
    policy. I have a hard time with your analysis that accredited
    investment rules have no "public good."Phrased differently,the
    view on the ground in middle America is this: lots of middle-
    class people buy lottery tickets. Why do you suppose they do
    that?
 
      whataretensors - 1 hours ago
      Young Warren Buffet could.I can go to Vegas and lose all my
      money on dice.  There aren't laws to prevent this.  Why are
      there laws to prevent my ability to invest?The regulation
      makes more sense as a way to keep the opportunities exclusive
      to the powerful, while regulators get to claim a moral high
      ground.
 
        wakamoleguy - 1 hours ago
        In many places in the United States, there actually are
        laws to prevent gambling.
 
          lojack - 51 minutes ago
          That?s clearly a straw man argument.A) The federal
          government doesn?t ban gambling.B) As far as I?m aware
          there isn?t a single place in this country where gambling
          is/isn?t allowed for those with specific net worths.
 
          wakamoleguy - 9 minutes ago
          It's not a strawman. The parent is suggesting that we as
          a people have no problem with allowing low-income or low-
          net-worth people to gamble (pointing to the acceptance of
          Las Vegas as evidence). Then an equivalence is drawn
          between gambling and securities investing. By pointing
          out that, in fact, 31 states make commercial casinos
          illegal[1], I am refuting the suggestion that gambling is
          considered acceptable, which weakens the argument that
          securities investing should be acceptable as well.[1] htt
          ps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambling_in_the_United_States
 
          [deleted]
 
      nkrisc - 1 hours ago
      You already have the opportunity to bankrupt yourself with
      lottery tickets and casinos, yet most people don't.
 
  cm2187 - 2 hours ago
  I have seen enough "super-smart" investors pretending to be dumb,
  unsophisticated and to have never been told of the risks when an
  investment goes bad not to have some sympathy for these investor
  sophistication thresholds.
 
  sharemywin - 2 hours ago
  On April 5, 2012, President Obama signed a landmark piece of bi-
  partisan legislation called The JOBS Act into law. The JOBS Act
  greatly expanded entrepreneurs? access to capital, allowing them
  to go to the crowd and publicly advertise their capital
  raises.Initially, private companies could only crowdfund from
  accredited investors, the wealthiest 2% of Americans. On June 19,
  2015, three years after the JOBS Act was initially signed into
  law, Title IV (Regulation A+) of the JOBS Act went into effect.
  For the first time, Title IV allows private growth-stage
  companies to raise money from all
  Americans.https://www.seedinvest.com/blog/jobs-act/raising-
  capital-reg...
 
    whataretensors - 2 hours ago
    I'm aware of the JOBS act.  It's still a different system than
    the rich get to use.Edit: not sure why I'm downvoted.  Middle
    class can't invest in filecoin, for instance, even though the
    top tier can.
 
nick_ - 2 hours ago
The crypto-currency the world needs is one which detects
pyramid/ponzi schemes and fraud in general.
 
  [deleted]
 
TaylorGood - 2 hours ago
Ponzi aside, let's say it's the greatest cryptocurrency idea. The
SEC has right to use their Howey Test to determine whether it's a
security. Based on 1,2,4 below, is this not ICO's?Under the Howey
Test, a transaction is a security (or investment contract) if:1. It
is an investment of money2. There is an expectation of profits from
the investment3. The investment of money is in a common
enterprise4. Any profit comes from the efforts of a promoter or
third partyBased on their recent cyber division being announced,
there is seemingly a strong possibility of review/conviction if
launching an ICO as a US citizen, no? Soliciting an unregistered
security carries 20yr prison term. Are dev's factoring this as
possible risk?
 
  xdeqx366 - 1 hours ago
  As a crypto-developer working in the blockchain space,  my
  primary company has opted to do an ICO as part of its operations.
  The company has existing VC backing of between 4-10 million,  and
  the project would benefit from blockchain - for one aspect. By no
  means is a new token necessary,  but that fact seems to have been
  side-stepped. The product exists,  and perceivably the token
  could be usable upon issuance...I enjoy working on the crypto for
  the project, but I concern myself with the eventual legalities of
  the ICO and how it might change the companies incentives
  internally.I have bills to pay,  leaving on principle alone isn't
  viable for me,  but,  if it could impact on my family,  I will.I
  am not a lawyer,  and the answers don't appear to be black and
  white.
 
    [deleted]
 
    [deleted]
 
  xdeqx366 - 1 hours ago
  Is "common enterprise" the only distinction between gambling and
  a security?
 
  unkown-unknowns - 1 hours ago
  How many of the Howey test questions must be "yes"? All? Any?
  More than x number of them?
 
    lostmsu - 1 hours ago
    They all seem to BE "yes "IMHO. So does it matter that much?
 
  wakamoleguy - 1 hours ago
  It seems that in practice, yes, most people who are buying into
  ICOs have an expectation of profits based on the
  actions/development/promotion of a third party team running the
  project. Matt Levine talked about some of the nuances of this
  back when the SEC released a report about the DAO[1].A couple
  days ago, I stumbled across a blog post of the Colony.IO
  project[2], who are creating a token and blockchain platform for
  distributed organizational management (coincidentally similar in
  concept to the DAO). They go into detail about their plans for
  having an ICO only once they have a product actively functional.
  The hopes are that with a working product, people buying the
  tokens will do so with the expectation that it is a sale of
  services, rather than an investment security. Now, their
  perspective is that of the team and their lawyers, and not
  necessarily that of the SEC. But if there is hope that ICOs won't
  all be securities, I think that is the pathway.[1]
  https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-07-26/tokens-
  va...[2] https://blog.colony.io/the-colony-token-sale-
  7ac14c845bc0
 
rebuilder - 3 hours ago
This was published 2014/03/11 as far as I can tell, if anyone is
wondering.
 
  sctb - 2 hours ago
  Thanks! We've updated the headline.
 
fmeyer - 2 hours ago
It happened in Brazil recently, where one company created a fake
cryptocurrency and used it on its Ponzi scheme.source:
https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=pt&tl=en&u=h...
 
  SippinLean - 2 hours ago
  It specifically says that it was a multilevel marketing/pyramid
  scheme, not a Ponzi scheme.
 
    ravishi - 2 hours ago
    Although I don't know the specifics of the scheme, it seemed
    like a pyramid scheme while it was running, but turned out to
    be a ponzi scheme when it went down. I would bet the people
    reporting don't know the difference between the two. I didn't
    until now.
 
[deleted]