GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-10-03) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Paul S. Otellini has died
249 points by DarkContinent
https://newsroom.intel.com/news-releases/paul-s-otellini-1950-2017/
___________________________________________________________________
 
heyheyhey - 4 hours ago
I remember Paul said his biggest regret was not working with Apple
on the iPhone.I wonder how different Intel would be today if that
occurred.
 
  raverbashing - 4 hours ago
  Well, they didn't have a competing product at the time. Atom on
  phones is kinda new, and I'm not sure it would fit Apple's
  requirements of battery life, etc
 
  GeekyBear - 2 hours ago
  Intel sure left a whole lot of money on the table for the TSMC's
  of the world to use for R&D and for capital expenditures like
  building more Fabs.
 
  ShabbosGoy - 4 hours ago
  Probably not much different, since Intel's baseband is on many
  versions of the iPhone.
 
  thecompilr - 4 hours ago
  Well, probably we would still see Apple develop their own CPUs.
  Intel just couldn't deliver on the low power promise.
 
  RachelF - 15 minutes ago
  Intel had an ARM chip division for Phone CPUs called XScale from
  2002 to 2006 when they sold it to Marvell to focus on the more
  profitable x86 series.[1] He may have believed the x86 Atom chips
  could replace the XScale.Xscale was widely used in Palm Treo's,
  Sony Clie's most Compaq Poquet PC's and the original Amazon
  Kindle.His "biggest regret" comment is pure rewriting of
  history.He made the wrong decision to get out of phone CPUs.This
  is probably one of the biggest blunders in Intel's
  history.[1]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XScale
 
robk - 3 hours ago
He was a very nice person who I greatly liked but as an alumni I'm
saddened at the architectural missteps that plagued the company
such as the Pentium 4 architecture changes that otherwise cost
billions of shareholder value. There was a vocal part of
engineering who were disappointed a finance guy was in charge for
the first time.
 
  Analemma_ - 2 hours ago
  This might be trying to put a post facto positive spin on a
  disaster, but I always heard from people involved with NetBurst
  that they learned a lot of lessons from that debacle that were
  applied to make Core as good as it was, and that without those it
  wouldn?t have been nearly as good. Again, take that all with a
  grain of salt, but maybe the P4 was a necessary step to get all
  the pretty-good chips that came afterward.Besides, if you?re
  looking for screw-ups that hammered Intel?s shareholder value, I
  don?t think the P4 is even in the top 3. Selling XScale and
  missing the boat on ARM was much worse.
 
    simonh - 2 hours ago
    I still dot get that. I can see how they made that move based
    on the situation at the time, but if not with the iPhone then
    by 2010 at least with the iPad launch they must have seen how
    much things had changed. It also was far from too late to pivot
    back into ARM. Look what Apple managed to do in just a few
    years starting from scratch. It?s not as if Intel worked out an
    alternative strategy either, if so where is it now? They?ve
    still effectively got nothing worthwhile in the mobile space
    after a decade.
 
  webosdude - 2 hours ago
  He wasn't a finance guy. He led sales and marketing before
  becoming CEO at Intel.
 
    irrational - 57 minutes ago
    That actually sounds worse (I work in the sales department of a
    Fortune 150 company).
 
asveikau - 4 hours ago
This might be a tad off-topic for HN, but the dates seem like an
odd coincidence: I am noticing that, per Wikipedia, Otellini was
born 8 days before Tom Petty, and they died on the same day.Edit:
it may be a silly observation I have made, but hn users are really
silly to downvote this.
 
_wmd - 5 hours ago
Second paragraph dives straight into corporate quarterly bonus
bullet point bullshit! What about the human! This is easily the
worst in memoriam I think I've ever seen. Written by some HR droid?
What an embarrassment, I think I just discovered why I'd never,
ever work for Intel
 
  topgunsarg - 5 hours ago
  Getting outraged over a paragraph detailing someone's
  professional accomplishments in their professional
  obituary...It's Intel's article on their former CEO's death,
  what's it supposed to do, detail his personal life?
 
    _wmd - 4 hours ago
    An obituary should detail a man and /his/ life rather than his
    relationship to a company, I understand how some people think
    this is justifiable, but I also just find it grotesque in every
    way. I know nothing more about him than I did prior to reading,
    or whether he achieved any kind of satisfaction in his personal
    life, which I think is kinda the point of these
    things.Quarterly OKRs for a millionaire? I really hope they
    weren't the entirety of his existence, otherwise we're all
    doomed
 
  sillysaurus3 - 5 hours ago
  Other accomplishments included signing on notable new customer
  engagements, such as winning the Apple PC business,FWIW that's
  impressive to me. Apple is probably one of their larger
  customers, and the deal could've gone to AMD instead.Business
  accomplishments can be worth praising.
 
  biggestdummy - 5 hours ago
  Disagree. Just because they are business accomplishments doesn't
  mean that they are without value. He likely worked incredibly
  hard to achieve those results. Why shouldn't they be recognized
  along with his mentoring and philanthropic works?
 
  sp332 - 5 hours ago
  A little tasteless, but it might have been an attempt to prevent
  high-frequency trading bots from freaking out and selling.
 
    dman - 5 hours ago
    I never thought about bots in this context, thanks for pointing
    this out.
 
  craftyguy - 5 hours ago
  Well, it does attribute the company's financial success during
  this period to him.
 
  yellowapple - 4 hours ago
  "What about the human!"I don't know if they've since edited it or
  what, but it currently describes plenty about how "the human" is
  the reason for those numbers.  It reads to me like a recognition
  of Otellini's successes as CEO.
 
nkkollaw - 4 hours ago
66!? Wow... That's sad in 2017. Not old at all.
 
  rdiddly - 4 hours ago
  Same age as Tom Petty; in fact they were born within 8 days of
  each other.
 
    propelol - 3 hours ago
    66 is pretty good if you are a heroin junkie
 
dbcurtis - 5 hours ago
Wow. Saddens me. I had the opportunity to meet Paul a couple of
times when I worked at Intel. Paul always impressed me as a great
executive and a great person.I have long believed that Paul is the
best post-Grove CEO that Intel has had. Otellini was as good of a
CEO as Grove, better in certain ways (consumer marketing
instincts). His tenure was not as long as Grove's and is under-
appreciated for that reason only.
 
keeptrying - 4 hours ago
He seems to have led a winderful and impactful life but it's a
little shocking when so many people in the news, who seemingly led
healthy lives, pass away in their 60s .  :(Why is this happening?
 
  athenot - 4 hours ago
  If the average life expectancy in the US is 78 years, that means
  there are plenty of people who might live to be 90, perhaps even
  beyond 100 and many who will die anywhere between childhood and
  that average number.Sadly, many interpret this to be that they
  will live to be that magic average number, and either get caught
  off-guard when time is up sooner (perhaps regretting having
  neglected family time / travel / personal stuff), or unprepared
  in the case they live 20 years beyond what their savings had
  projected to last.
 
    rootbear - 4 hours ago
    My mother, who turns 97 today, is utterly astonished that she's
    still alive.
 
      jameskegel - 4 hours ago
      Is she fairly active? I've noticed over the years, the ones
      that just refuse to stop moving just keep going, for the most
      part.
 
        rootbear - 9 minutes ago
        She isn't active now, but up until a few years ago, she was
        the primary caregiver for my father, who had Alzheimer's.
        It kept her busy. She also spent a lot of time on fixing
        healthy food.
 
        yeukhon - 3 hours ago
        I second this. I know a lot of elders who are fairly active
        outdoor and indoor seem to do better, much like plants need
        sunlight and fresh air. My grandma used to live in China by
        herself and her parish was only a few doors down. When she
        finally came to live with us in the U.S., she still go to
        church every morning, but she has to walk two blocks. After
        a few months, her walking has improved, and crane is now
        optional on the good sunny days. She eats well too
        (compared to what she would eat in China..) She's 88 years
        old today.For many years, Chinese elders are recommended to
        go to senior citizen clubs, play chess games and Mahjong,
        do TaiChi or something alike, for better physical and
        mental health. The unfortunate side of the reality is many
        elders are disabled and have no one to get them where they
        need to be except getting help from senior assistance. I
        hope more families can spend more time with their elderly.
 
        Scarblac - 3 hours ago
        On the other hand there are also those people who are quite
        active and just don't wake up some morning in their early
        40s.
 
          noir_lord - 2 hours ago
          I don't fear death, I fear suffering before it.I'm less
          concerned with when I punch out than with how I punch
          out.The thing that scares me more than physical infirmity
          (and I can say this with a degree of certainty since I
          have a serious spine condition that at one point could
          have meant a wheelchair) is mental infirmity.Terry
          Pratchett (and others) had it right, We should be allowed
          to choose our end time while we are in sound mind.That we
          don't have Euthanasia in most 'modern' societies I think
          is insane.
 
          EdSharkey - 2 hours ago
          > That we don't have Euthanasia in most 'modern'
          societies I think is insane.An insanely complex and
          thorny issue, maybe.I would argue that once preserving
          life is negotiable, a debate on the utility of the
          elderly and infirmed soon follows.  Ruthless bureaucratic
          directives will simply roll off the tongue like, "maybe
          your mother should just take a pain pill", if you recall
          that ol' chestnut from prez. Obama.So, if you want to
          institutionalize murdering inconvenient people, go ahead
          and make your case.  I'll oppose such self-hating
          foolishness.  If you do get your way, don't be surprised
          when you're powerless and some bean counter
          unceremoniously pulls your plug before you're ready to
          go, just to free up a bed.
 
          khedoros1 - 47 minutes ago
          If I'm of sound mind and choose to die, then who are you
          to stop me in the name of "preserving life"? Life has
          value, but so do personal rights. Every human has the
          right to life. I don't see any reason that they shouldn't
          also have the right to decide when to give that right
          up.> So, if you want to institutionalize murdering
          inconvenient people, go ahead and make your case.That's
          the exact opposite of what is being discussed here:
          Murder is a disgusting violation of personal rights.
 
          noir_lord - 1 hours ago
          You didn't so much as step onto that slippery slope as
          strap on some ski's and make it an Olympic event.> An
          insanely complex and thorny issue, maybe.So are most
          major issues society has to deal with.> I would argue
          that once preserving life is negotiable, a debate on the
          utility of the elderly and infirmed soon follows.Perhaps
          but we already have that debate every time the government
          decides how much money to put into elderly care (hint: In
          my country (the UK) not as much as they should - Social
          Care for the elderly is critically underfunded)> So, if
          you want to institutionalize murdering inconvenient
          people.Not sure how you got there from my post but for
          what it is worth, I don't - I want the opinion of the
          person in sound mind backed up by competent medical
          professionals to be respected as a matter of body
          autonomy, We don't get to force surgery on adults of
          sound mind for example and here in the UK other things
          are regulated in a similar system - I can choose not to
          have surgery that will kill me if I don't have it, that's
          fine but I can't choose the manner of my death, it seems
          contradictory to me, We put animals that are suffering to
          sleep because it's humane but we don't extend the same
          right to humans who are capable of asking for it and yes
          there are arguments against but nothing is perfect, the
          question I always ask is "in aggregate does this benefit
          people" if you wait around for the perfect solution you
          end up not implementing a 'merely' better one.> If you do
          get your way, don't be surprised when you're powerless
          and some bean counter unceremoniously pulls your plug
          before you're ready to go, just to free up a bed.And if
          we don't, don't be surprised when the secret Martian
          master race turn up and harvest your essence....
 
          aaronbrethorst - 1 hours ago
              Ruthless bureaucratic directives will simply     roll
          off the tongue like, "maybe your mother     should just
          take a pain pill", if you recall     that ol' chestnut
          from prez. Obama.  Death panels!
          http://www.snopes.com/politics/medical/over75.asp
 
        sbierwagen - 1 hours ago
        http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/644554>Sur
        vival increased across the full range of gait speeds, with
        significant increments per 0.1 m/s. At age 75, predicted
        10-year survival across the range of gait speeds ranged
        from 19% to 87% in men and from 35% to 91% in women.
        Predicted survival based on age, sex, and gait speed was as
        accurate as predicted based on age, sex, use of mobility
        aids, and self-reported function or as age, sex, chronic
        conditions, smoking history, blood pressure, body mass
        index, and hospitalization.Graph of life expectancy vs gait
        speed: http://jamanetwork.com/data/Journals/JAMA/8042/joc05
        171f2.pn...Table with confidence intervals: http://jamanetw
        ork.com/data/Journals/JAMA/8042/joc05171t2.pn...
 
        frozenport - 3 hours ago
        Problem here is that many can't move due to injury or
        similiar.
 
        irrational - 1 hours ago
        I visited my 95 year old grandmother this past Sunday. She
        was up and moving around the entire time except when
        sitting down to eat the delicious lunch she had insisted on
        cooking for us. Her hearing is starting to go, but her
        eyesight is still fine and her mental faculties are razor
        sharp. She still lives on her own and can get around just
        fine.Part of it is surely genetic. Her father lived to be
        nearly 105 and was 100% healthy physically and mentally
        until 2 weeks before he died when he developed shingles and
        got sores in his mouth that made it difficult to eat so he
        stopped eating and died. He was still breaking horses into
        his late-80s.I also wonder if it was something to do with
        how she was raised. She grew up on a ranch and spent a lot
        of time outdoors tending the cows and sheep We were
        visiting the old property this summer and she told us we
        should go on a hike to see a waterfall up a canyon where
        she once had to retrieve a flock of lost sheep - it was one
        of the most difficult hikes I've ever been on and I can't
        believe she did it and brought back the sheep while still a
        young girl. They made them tougher back in those days I
        guess.
 
    phkahler - 3 hours ago
    >> Sadly, many interpret this to be that they will live to be
    that magic average number...And some of us have the notion that
    money can push your date out further. Then we see CEOs die
    "early" and realize nobody is an exception.
 
  sliverstorm - 4 hours ago
  Totally unscientific, but I think it's conspicuous that is right
  around retirement. Maybe people who are living on sheer
  determination lose their purpose. Maybe people who need to be
  busy are suddenly bored out of their minds. Maybe work kept them
  moving, and without it they tanked quickly.I have no real proof,
  but I'll be prodding my father to find a side job or volunteer
  work or a really deep hobby as he approaches retirement.
 
    evo - 2 hours ago
    How do you disentangle the correlation, though?Is it not also
    possible that a driven person retires because, perhaps
    subconsciously, they recognize symptoms that both impair their
    continued performance and portend their imminent demise?
 
      sliverstorm - 1 hours ago
      Simple, 65 is the standard retirement age and has been for a
      long time now, while longevity patterns have shifted.
 
    irrational - 20 minutes ago
    My father is a doctor. He is in his 70s and works 60 hour weeks
    at the Native American reservation clinic that he started
    working at after he retired and built his dream home out in the
    middle of nowhere. He claims that a 60 hour work week is
    retirement for a doctor. He certainly doesn't need the money,
    but says he will continue showing up at the clinic till he
    dies.
 
    CryptoPunk - 3 hours ago
    If what you say about deaths rising after retirement is true,
    it could be the loss of a routine. I suspect (and I also have
    no evidence for this) that a routine, honed over many years, is
    important to health. Also, loneliness is highly correlated with
    increased chance of death. The end of work life could
    significantly increase loneliness.
 
      vasilipupkin - 1 hours ago
      or you know, it could have nothing to do with these handwavy
      claims and instead, he may have had a terminal illness, in
      part triggered by years of extreme stress and super hard
      work.
 
madamelic - 5 hours ago
This is going to sound really heartless: Imagine working for the
same company your entire adult life, retiring and dying 4 years
later.The thought of that, as a 26-year old, terrifies me.
 
  eterm - 5 hours ago
  If that frightens you then you shouldn't sacrifice yourself
  working expecting some kind of future pay-off.Live around your
  work, so you are working to enjoy life now, not in the
  future.That doesn't mean "slack off" or "can working", it just
  means find hobbies you enjoy and dedicate yourself as much to
  them as your work.
 
  pm90 - 5 hours ago
  You can die TODAY in a car crash, the 4th largest killer of
  Americans.Life is pretty fleeting; we plan for a long healthy
  life and  in most cases it does pan out. But you can get super
  unlucky for whatever reason.
 
  40acres - 3 hours ago
  26 year old Intel employee here. Totally get where you're coming
  from but would like to mention that Intel is a gigantic company.
  I know 20+ year vets who have had 3-4 different careers here.
  From the comments floating around in our internal network it
  seems like Paul had a pretty dynamic career.My biggest concern is
  folks dying soon after retirement. It's pretty scary to envision
  working for 40+ years and not be able to enjoy retirement.
 
  dnautics - 5 hours ago
  my dad worked for the federal government.  The federal government
  harassed him in the workplace for being a whistleblower.  He sued
  the federal government.  The stress of the lawsuit deteriorated
  his health.  He died one year after retiring.
 
    raugustinus - 4 hours ago
    Sorry for your loss. But at least he cleared his conscience.
    Sorry he had to go through the stress as well. It might take
    decades, but they will reap what they sow.
 
      dnautics - 3 hours ago
      Honestly, I doubt that they will reap what they sow.  I
      repeatedly told him to give up on the case specifically for
      the reason, so he should have known what he was getting into.
      I'm also not terribly sad at his death, I think it's just my
      personality.  Thank you for your consideration.
 
    micah94 - 5 hours ago
    This terrifies me.
 
  tbrooks - 5 hours ago
  Which part is terrifying?Working at the same company for a long
  duration? Or dying soon after retiring?
 
    madamelic - 5 hours ago
    All of it.The idea of (seemingly) having never explored other
    places. He graduated and immediately joined Intel and never
    left.Maybe he was happy-as-a-clam there but spending your
    entire adult life having (seemingly) never taken a risk.There
    is obviously a lot of assumption and judgement to this though.
 
      cortesoft - 4 hours ago
      What is so great about taking a risk when you are already
      happy? What would you gain?You should only take a risk when
      the gain is worth it; if you already have what you want, the
      gain is not worth it.Also, changing jobs is just one type of
      risk you can take. Maybe his steady work was his foundation
      for taking other risks in other parts of his life.
 
        irrational - 25 minutes ago
        You gain stress! Oh wait...
 
        SCHiM - 4 hours ago
        Is happiness the ultimate pursuit in life?Many philosophers
        thought so, but there are other pursuits. The philosophy of
        virtue (not in the biblical sense) describes one such
        alternative. The teachings of the virtue ethics can be
        perceived to mean that your pursuit should be mastery of
        any one (or number) of subject(s) and/or character traits.
        Mastery would be the perfect marriage between effort,
        preparation and result (or in the case of ethics, the
        perfect life in balance, cultivating the good in you).There
        are as many reasons to do things as there are people do do
        them ;)
 
          cortesoft - 2 hours ago
          Happiness was simply a proxy for whatever your intrinsic
          goals in life are; unless risk itself is your intrinsic
          goal, the goal itself doesn't change my argument.
 
      mfoy_ - 4 hours ago
      He joined out of school then climbed to CEO. That's damned
      impressive.It would take commitment, grit, skill, and so much
      more to do that. It's not like he was a mindless pencil
      pusher in the same dead-end job his whole life.
 
      apohn - 4 hours ago
      >Maybe he was happy-as-a-clam there but spending your entire
      adult life having (seemingly) never taken a risk.If he was
      able to climb the ladder to become the CEO, he probably took
      some very big risks and had a very big target on his back.
      The risks are just different from moving from one company to
      another.I've worked at different large companies and met
      plenty of people who only did exactly what was asked for
      them.  They barely took any risks.  Every few years they got
      a standard promotion as per HR policy, but ultimately their
      career trajectory stalled.  There's nothing wrong with that,
      but somebody who can climb to be a CEO of a company like
      Intel surely took some risks and did something to stand out?
 
      sillysaurus3 - 5 hours ago
      I share your concerns, but it's easy not to do that: we have
      unparalleled freedom to switch companies nowadays.
 
      theandrewbailey - 4 hours ago
      Intel has made some risky moves and bad bets since he became
      an executive (1990?), and even further back when he was
      hired. Pentium 4, XScale, and Itanium come to my mind.Intel
      hasn't been a tiny start up for decades. You can do many
      different things inside a large company that is in so many
      markets. Just because someone stays at the same company for
      their entire career doesn't mean that they were riding the
      gravy train the entire time.
 
        jronsomers - 4 hours ago
        You're hitting the nail on the head here. When I interned
        at Intel, they constantly said that even if you aren't
        happy in your current role once you are full time, you can
        always transfer teams and do something wildly different
        since the company is so large. So you can effectively 'job
        hop', but within the same company.
 
      antisthenes - 4 hours ago
      This is just unsubstantiated FOMO.You'll grow out of it once
      you hit 30.
 
      tbrooks - 4 hours ago
      Different strokes for different folks.I hope to work at the
      same company for the rest of my life, raise my kids, vacation
      regularly with my wife, then die. I would be completely
      content with a 'boring' life.
 
        irrational - 26 minutes ago
        I'm the same. Take risks? No thanks. Give me boring any
        day. The last time we took the kids to Disneyland I
        realized that I'm more of a Jungle Cruise kind of guy than
        that Indiana Jones ride.
 
  geoffreyhale - 4 hours ago
  In our 20s, we tend to value newness/variety more highly.
  Decades later, we tend to value impact/legacy more highly.
 
    noobermin - 4 hours ago
    And if anything, he has solidified that to a greater degree
    than most people in SV burning through start-ups and VC money
    will anyway.
 
  apohn - 5 hours ago
  Let me restate this a different way.Imagine having multiple jobs
  where you are recognized and have the type of impact that
  transforms the entire world.  In this case all of that happened
  at one company.  He probably had enough money to retire well
  before the time he did, so I assume he enjoyed something about
  working there?  So maybe he didn't feel bad he only had 4 years
  of retirement?
 
    adventured - 4 hours ago
    >  So maybe he didn't feel bad he only had 4 years of
    retirement?He had a family, including children. Maybe that
    pointless speculation isn't appropriate either direction.
 
      i_cant_speel - 4 hours ago
      The person you responded to isn't saying he would have been
      fine with dying today. They're saying that working at Intel
      his entire life isn't something that he was likely bothered
      by.  If he wanted to retire or change companies, he had many
      opportunities to do so.
 
        adventured - 3 hours ago
        I didn't say that's what the parent was saying. Comically
        you're misconstruing what I think the parent said.I said,
        very clearly, that speculating on whether Paul would be ok
        with just having four years of retirement, is pointless
        speculation and impolite - or worse - toward the family he
        left behind. It is. A few seconds of thinking in empathy
        first, would prevent the entire discussion over what Paul
        may or may not have been interested in. Frankly, I don't
        even like having to explain the obviousness of how crude
        this conversation is.To be clear, it's not an issue of
        whether discussing retirement matters in general in this
        thread is obnoxious. It's about speculating on Paul's
        specific choices or preferences. That is obnoxious.
 
          jamiek88 - 2 hours ago
          In your opinion.It's not like there is some societal
          taboo being broken here.The trade off between obsessive,
          90 hour work weeks that make a CEO, and living for four
          fucking years afterwards is a discussion worth having.Was
          it worth it? Do the family think it was worth it?
 
  jononor - 3 hours ago
  Don't plan to live your life when you retire. You will spend the
  majority of your life working, so better make sure you find
  something you enjoy. Live today.
 
  mc32 - 5 hours ago
  That presumes that he didn't enjoy and didnt find satisfaction in
  going to work and contributing to computing.There are many
  retirees who enjoy their emeritus status so they can continue
  "work".
 
  Scarblac - 3 hours ago
  As a cynical 43 year old: that wouldn't happen to me, age of
  retiring in my country is 67 and rising...
 
  ksec - 5 hours ago
  That is if working literally means; working.Steve Jobs died soon
  after he retired. And working at (nearly) the same company /
  dreams his entire adult life. Or more like he was forced to
  retire due to his health.But Apple Park. As if He wasn't gonna
  let death get in the way of his Dream.From reading books and
  listening to his talks he gave on life, I am sure he didn't
  regret it one bit.?I have looked in the mirror every morning and
  asked myself: "If today were the last day of my life, would I
  want to do what I am about to do today?" And whenever the answer
  has been "No" for too many days in a row, I know I need to change
  something.? - Steve Jobs.
 
    [deleted]
 
    SmellTheGlove - 3 hours ago
    > ?I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself:
    "If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what
    I am about to do today?" And whenever the answer has been "No"
    for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.?
    - Steve Jobs.I agree with the sentiment, but it's also very
    easy for someone as financially secure as Jobs to make that
    call.
 
    valuearb - 2 hours ago
    Jobs didn't retire, he was dying of cancer and passed on the
    CEO role to Tim Cook 2 months before he died.
 
  narendraj9 - 3 hours ago
  Retirement is not the only time one lives a life.
 
  pcunite - 4 hours ago
  66 is way too young! Know your place in this life, so that
  ultimately you are ready at any age.youarehere.place
 
    exacube - 4 hours ago
    Couldn't have guessed from this comment/URL that it would be
    about finding/accepting jesus.
 
  nkkollaw - 4 hours ago
  I would say that that happens most of the times.Our society is
  based on work, that's why you should try to get a good one.
 
  tabeth - 5 hours ago
  99.99% of people on this site will die and their employers won't
  care at all (whether they should or not is another story). I'd
  say if he worked hard and long enough to get recognition he was
  probably pretty happy with what he did and/or the outcome of his
  efforts.
 
    craftyguy - 3 hours ago
    > 99.99% of people on this site will dieI'd say that it's
    probably closer to 100% of us will die.
 
    gigatexal - 4 hours ago
    Sure. Depends though where you work: at my firm, a publicly
    traded healthcare services company, when the last person passed
    away it was a big deal and everyone knew about it.
 
  noobermin - 4 hours ago
  Some people work on a farm for all their lives. Some people stay
  at home with their kids and don't work. Some people tend to a
  monastery and meditate all their days. And on and on and
  on.Different things fulfill different people.
 
  WalterBright - 4 hours ago
  I enjoy my work and plan on working until I am no longer able to.
 
  valuearb - 2 hours ago
  I retired when I was 40 years old. It sucked. I'm much happier
  now that I went back to work.
 
    hbhakhra - 31 minutes ago
    Sounds like an interesting story. Have you written about it
    anywhere or would you care to elaborate here?
 
  rayiner - 4 hours ago
  The companies where people spent their careers aren?t like the
  ones today where everyone job hops. You grew with the company,
  and often, the company supported your growth because it was
  expected that it would grow its talent in house. And you didn?t
  give up 100% of your life to the company in a continuous sprint
  trying to get to the big exit.My dad worked for the same company
  for 25 years. He helped it grow and benefited from that growth by
  moving up internally, and he had enough time left over to raise a
  family. When he left at 60 to consult and start his own company,
  it?s not like he?d spent the previous 25 years in a sprint with
  nothing to show for it.
 
    [deleted]
 
  koolba - 5 hours ago
  Heartless? Up until quite recently, that was the norm.