GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-27) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger observed by
LIGO and Virgo
299 points by nickcw
https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/news/ligo20170927
___________________________________________________________________
 
ricardobeat - 4 hours ago
What are the practical applications of technology that could be
derived from these discoveries? Any chance of us harvesting this
energy?
 
  sleavey - 2 hours ago
  (LIGO collaboration postdoc)There have been plenty of
  technologies pioneered by the collaboration in the development of
  the detectors - control of optical cavities via radio frequency
  signals being one big one, and low thermal noise monolithic
  silica fibre suspensions being another. The discovery of
  gravitational waves, however, simply improves our understanding
  of the universe and has no known practical applications.It's
  great to live in a time when countries are willing to fund such
  bold leaps into the unknown, without obvious monetary pay-offs.
 
  throwaway613834 - 4 hours ago
  You mean from this distance? Or do you mean if a closer one
  occurred?
 
  stefco_ - 3 hours ago
  Hi, I'm a grad student working on LIGO.There is no practical way
  to harvest this energy. Gravitational waves interact very weakly
  with matter. This is part of why they are useful for
  observations: GWs can travel from the core of violent events
  unmodified, unlike light, which gets blocked by surrounding
  matter. You can't see the center of a core collapse supernova
  with light, but you can see it with GWs and neutrinos. They also
  won't get bent by EM or gravitational fields, meaning that the
  direction they come from in the sky points straight back to the
  source. And unlike very high energy gamma rays, they don't pair
  produce into electrons.This all makes them great for astronomy
  and totally useless for extracting energy.
 
    chebucto - 1 hours ago
    What happens to that energy, though? Energy is conserved, even
    with gravitational waves, correct?So, what happens to the
    energy - does some of it get converted into 'normal' potential
    energy by changing the (amount of gravity? gravitational
    fields?) of the stuff that it passes through - the weak
    interaction that you refer to?And, if it interacts very weakly,
    does all of the energy eventually get used up this way - do GWs
    get 'used up' before they travel across the universe?(Probably
    a meaningless question): can GWs hit the edge of the universe,
    and if so, what happens then?
 
  vorotato - 1 hours ago
  Finding aliens using warp drives! :D ....
 
dpcx - 4 hours ago
A coworker earlier mentioned a paper questioning the validity of
the findings around gravitational waves. Can anyone point me to
them and (as a non-scientist) explain why this paper would think
those findings are inaccurate?
 
  ISL - 4 hours ago
  Context (too busy getting physics done today to expound further,
  except to state that I presently agree with
  LIGO):https://www.wired.com/story/strange-noise-in-
  gravitational-w...
 
  InclinedPlane - 42 minutes ago
  Your coworker might be confusing the LIGO observations (widely
  considered to be some of the most meticulously done research in
  science) with the BICEP2 early big bang gravitational wave
  research, which has since been called into question
  substantially.
 
  batmansmk - 4 hours ago
  Can you coworker provide some info instead?
 
    dpcx - 4 hours ago
    He could provide information about the paper, sure. The
    explanation, I'm fairly certain, he could not.
 
  sleavey - 2 hours ago
  LIGO made an unofficial response via the blog of Sean Carroll
  [1]. The problem with the analysis in the paper that questioned
  LIGO's results was that they misinterpreted the filtering that
  had been applied to the data shown in the original GW150914
  paper, which led them to think there was noise produced by the
  detectors themselves.[1]
  http://www.preposterousuniverse.com/blog/2017/06/18/a-respon...
 
autocorr - 3 hours ago
From an observational astronomy point of view, perhaps the most
interesting thing about the report is that by including the Virgo
detector with both LIGO detectors, the uncertainty in the direction
the gravitational wave event was reduced by a factor of 10! The
"error ellipse" on the sky is now ~60 square degrees as opposed to
~600. This makes it much more feasible to do rapid observational
follow-up with other observatories at all wavelengths (radio,
optical, X-ray, etc.), to search for the counterparts.Many
observatories like the VLA, Chandra, Fermi, Gemini, have a rapid
response trigger for the detection events, where within minutes
they will stop their current operations. Observations in the EM
spectrum are crucial for learning about a huge number of questions
in astrophysics, like what kinds of galaxies do the merger events
originate from, where are they located in those  galaxies, how does
the luminosity decay at different wavelengths, etc. It will be
seriously exciting when the first counterpart is discovered!
 
  c3534l - 2 hours ago
  A factor of 10 would be impressive enough, but a factor of
  3,628,800 is incomprehensible.
 
    vorotato - 1 hours ago
    you could say it's astronomical
 
  viraptor - 21 minutes ago
  > a rapid response trigger for the detection events, where within
  minutes they will stop their current operationsIs that a large
  enough margin? What would be typical delay between noticing
  gravitational wave event and seeing the related EM waves?
 
  sleavey - 3 hours ago
  Here's a skymap [1] that really drives home the point about how
  much having a third detector helps.[1] http://www.virgo-
  gw.eu/skymap.html
 
    stefco_ - 2 hours ago
    Having extra detectors also helps hugely with uptime.We're
    currently only active and collecting clean data ~50% of the
    time for each detector. We need at least two detectors active
    for a detection, and need three detectors for this kind of
    beautiful directional isolation. So having extra detectors
    decreases our skymap areas significantly, which helps in EM
    followup, but it also significantly reduces GW detector network
    downtime. And it allows for graceful degradation; with 5
    detectors, you can afford to have a couple detectors down and
    still detect an event with good direction reconstruction.We
    also have tons of downtime for upgrades. Now that our second
    observing run is over, we have a ~1.5yr upgrade cycle. There's
    no point in running VIRGO without LIGO (except for engineering
    reasons); having more detectors will increase flexibility in
    this regard, too.When KAGRA and LIGO India come online, we
    should see much better skymaps, but we will also see much
    higher uptimes (and hence higher detection rates).It's
    especially exciting to see improved direction reconstruction
    given that VIRGO has faced setbacks this year with their
    mirrors. I wasn't expecting to see such beautiful skymaps until
    our third observing run! Needless to say it was an exciting
    summer :)- grad student working on LIGO
 
      saganus - 1 hours ago
      1.5 years for an upgrade?Can you expand on why it takes so
      much time to do an upgrade?I'm guessing it's due to the
      complexity of the system, kinda like with the LHC? or is it
      something different?I mean, having equipment that expensive
      on downtime for more than a year seems like a lot!
 
        sleavey - 56 minutes ago
        The required time is due to how complicated the instruments
        are, and how hard it is to tune them such that they achieve
        the sensitivities they are designed to achieve across such
        a wide frequency band.In the downtime until O3, new optics
        are to be installed. As these are 40kg each and suspended
        from monolithic fused silica fibres (each a couple hundred
        microns thick), this process is complicated and requires
        great care to avoid damaging either the fibres or the
        optics during installation. In addition, both LIGO and
        Virgo are going to get squeezed light sources installed,
        which allow for reduction of limiting quantum noise at high
        frequencies. These are immensely sensitive to light loss in
        the optical path, so commissioners need to be very careful
        to minimised scattered light and ensure good
        alignment.After making all of the planned upgrades, the
        interferometers then need to be recommissioned: all of the
        control loops (of which there are thousands) need to be re-
        tuned from their settings as of now, given the changes in
        the behaviour of the interferometer due to the upgrades.
        This takes a lot of person power and a lot of time to get
        right - for the first observing run this process was
        basically also 1.5 years.
 
          saganus - 37 minutes ago
          Wow!Great explanation. Thanks!I just can't start to
          fathom the complexity of these instruments.Also... how
          cool that you get to work on such interesting field and
          with such cool "lab" devices!
 
rcthompson - 4 hours ago
> about 3 solar masses were converted into gravitational-wave
energy during the coalescenceThis is such a staggering amount of
energy to be released in such a short time.
 
  leeoniya - 4 hours ago
  more or less than https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma-ray_burst ?
 
    throwaway613834 - 4 hours ago
    I think less? When a gamma-ray burst is pointed towards Earth,
    the focusing of its energy along a relatively narrow beam
    causes the burst to appear much brighter than it would have
    been were its energy emitted spherically. When this effect is
    taken into account, typical gamma-ray bursts are observed to
    have a true energy release of about 10^44 J, or about 1/2000 of
    a Solar mass (M) energy equivalent. [1][1]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma-ray_burst#Energetics_and...
 
      rcthompson - 4 hours ago
      I think another sentence in that article might need
      revision:> No known process in the universe can produce this
      much energy [1 solar mass equivalent] in such a short time.
 
    danharaj - 4 hours ago
    The wikipedia article says that if a GRB were a spherical
    release of energy, they would be on the same order. However,
    GRB's are highly anisotropic; most of the energy is expelled in
    a smaller cone. One of the estimates on the page is that a
    typical GRB expels 1/2000th a solar mass of energy. So these
    gravity events are thousands of times more powerful.These
    scales are incomprehensible, at least to me.
 
    ntumlin - 4 hours ago
    From the wiki page:> When this effect is taken into account,
    typical gamma-ray bursts are observed to have a true energy
    release of about 1044 J, or about 1/2000 of a Solar mass (M)
    energy equivalentSo more, by about 6000 times.This is
    consistant with WolframAlpha's output for amount of energy:
    5.361e47 J. I tried to convert this to "number of years we
    could power the Earth", but it just changed it from one mind
    boggling number into another.
 
      dragonwriter - 4 hours ago
      > > When this effect is taken into account, typical gamma-ray
      bursts are observed to have a true energy release of about
      1044 J,Copy-paste error here from losing sup/sub formatting,
      that's 10^44 J, not 1044 J.
 
    [deleted]
 
  jobu - 4 hours ago
  Didn't realize that energy could be converted into gravitational
  waves. It does make sense I suppose, but I always thought gravity
  and gravitational waves were just a side-effect of the way mass
  interacted with space-time.
 
    SomeStupidPoint - 4 hours ago
    Can't you radiate potential gravitational energy as
    gravitational waves without any sort of particle changes,
    because potential gravitational energy is stored in the
    configuration of the system?If I drop my bowling ball, it has
    lower potential energy, but can't some of that be compensated
    for by the Earth-ball system radiating a gravitational wave
    (rather than all being converted into kinetic
    energy)?Similarly, don't orbiting bodies emit gravitational
    waves? I forget the exact dynamics, but the way that they drag
    just a little bit as they orbit creates waves that radiate
    power out of the system -- I think the Sun and Jupiter radiate
    something like 55 watts of gravitational waves.If you take two
    things that are each tens of times larger than the Sun and set
    them spinning an appreciable amount of the speed of light very
    nearby -- to the point they eventually collide -- it's not
    surprising they emit quite a bit more than our solar
    system.Think of it this way:Two large objects start orbiting
    slowly far apart. But because they're large and the system is
    big, they have a lot of orbital momentum.They pull each other
    close, but as they get closer, that orbital momentum has
    nowhere to dissipate, so they orbit faster and
    faster!......Except that because they're so massive, they
    slightly tug space around with them as they orbit. And because
    they're orbiting so fast, space doesn't have a good way to
    smooth itself out. So some of the momentum from the heavy
    things spinning far apart gets stored in wrinkles in space as
    they come together.Which then radiates away from there to us,
    ...and slightly stretches one direction of reality as it passes
    by. Which we detect by measuring how long two perpendicular
    lines are very accurately a few different places on a nearly
    spherical object....So you can model it as just the way that
    mass interacts with spacetime if you remember to include things
    like the distribution of your mass as a source of potential
    energy that can itself be used to generate gravitational waves.
    However, this does not make the whole situation any less weird
    to explain.Reports just tend to convert the amount of energy
    released through mechanisms like that in terms of mass, because
    it's the only thing vaguely comprehensible. (eg, 3 suns)
 
      teraflop - 3 hours ago
      > If I drop my bowling ball, it has lower potential energy,
      but can't some of that be compensated for by the Earth-ball
      system radiating a gravitational wave (rather than all being
      converted into kinetic energy)?Nothing wrong with your
      comment, but I just want to emphasize that for objects
      smaller than stars, the amount of energy carried by
      gravitational waves ranges from tiny to unimaginably tiny.
      The Earth-Moon system emits about 7 microwatts of
      gravitational waves. A bowling ball in low earth orbit would
      radiate about 5*10^-41 W, which is roughly equivalent to one
      photon of visible light every quadrillion years.
 
    WhoBeI - 3 hours ago
    According to Einstein there is no gravity that pulls us to the
    center of Earth. Instead mass curves spacetime in such a way to
    make you experience traveling along the curvature as gravity.
    If the mass is rotating the curvature will also drag on the
    surrounding spacetime. Imagine something like a whirlpool and
    then consider what happens if two of those merge. While merging
    some of their energy will cause waves in the surrounding water
    that eventually fades away with range. Those waves would be the
    gravitational waves - ripples in spacetime.
 
      lomnakkus - 2 hours ago
      Incidentally, I also find the "geometrical" approach a great
      way to look at the whole "light vs. black holes" thing: It's
      not that black holes directly "trap" light or "prevent light
      from escaping" per se, it's more that spacetime gets curved
      so much that regardless of which direction a ray of light is
      traveling it'll always find itself back inside the event
      horizon.(Not sure where I first heard this explanation, but I
      can definitely say that I didn't originate it!)
 
    Florin_Andrei - 3 hours ago
    Well, if it's a wave, it carries energy. That energy has to
    come from somewhere. And relativity teaches us that energy and
    mass are the two sides of the same coin.
 
    InclinedPlane - 45 minutes ago
    In a system of binary black holes where one is 31 solar masses
    and the other is 25 they have event horizon radii of 93 and 75
    km, respectively. At the point their event horizons start to
    touch they have a relative distance of 168 km. Each of them
    have a gravitational potential energy in the other's
    gravitational field of G m1 m2 / r or 1.22e48 Joules. Both of
    them together have a total gravitational potential energy of
    2.44e48 Joules or 1.36e31 kg (6.8 solar masses).(In reality the
    mass contribution due to the gravitational potential energy is
    included in the "mass", this is just illustrative.)
 
  wlesieutre - 4 hours ago
  EDIT - Thanks to bonzini for catching a mistake, I'd typod 47 as
  74 on the first line and drastically inflated everything after
  that. It's still huge though.Wolfram Alpha gives a solar mass as
  1.988435?10^30 kg. Multiply that by (299,292,458 m/s)^2, you get
  ~1.78?10^47 Joules.The most powerful manmade explosion in history
  was Tsar Bomba, a Soviet hydrogen bomb with 210 Petajoule
  (210?10^15 J) yeild.Amount of energy released by the black holes
  merging is 8.48?10^29 times greater, so you'd need to set off
  that many Tsar Bombas to get equal total yeild.The universe is
  4.3?10^17 seconds old, meaning if you set off a Tsar Bomba every
  second since the beginning of time, you'd still be off by a
  factor of 1.953?10^12.You need about 2,000,000,000,000,000,000
  Tsar Bombas every second since the big bang to match it.The mind
  boggles.
 
    bonzini - 4 hours ago
    That 10^74 should have been 10^47, shouldn't it?So it's "only"
    a million billions (10^15) tsar bombas (10^15) every second
    (10^17, 15+15+17=47).
 
      wlesieutre - 4 hours ago
      Good catch, can't believe I flipped that! Certainly changes
      things, one second while I revise.
 
    wlesieutre - 4 hours ago
    EDIT - originally compared the last factor to number of grains
    of sand on Earth squared, but after catching the error above
    that's much too large.So how big is the remaining 2x10^12 bombs
    per seconds?Wikipedia has some other suggestions:    ~10^12
    stars in the Andromeda galaxy     1.98x10^12 links on Wikipedia
    3.04?10^12 trees on Earth in 2015     3.5?10^12 estimated fish
    in the ocean     So take every link on Wikipedia (or two thirds
    of the trees on Earth), turn each one into the largest hydrogen
    bomb ever detonated, and blow them all up every second since
    the beginning of the universe, and that's how much energy we're
    talking about.Thanks again to bonzini for spotting the rather
    large error!
 
      rcthompson - 4 hours ago
      Funnily enough, the past two XKCD comics are both relevant
      here:  https://xkcd.com/1894/ https://xkcd.com/1895/
 
      bas - 4 hours ago
      Nicely (back of) napkinned!
 
        wlesieutre - 3 hours ago
        Originally typo'd pretty hard and had numbers much too
        high! It's still a larger amount of energy than I can even
        imagine.That's what I get for trying to do math in a