GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-25) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
68% of total Ethereum transaction value controlled by one system
110 points by bmj1
https://blog.cyber.fund/huge-ethereum-mixer-6cf98680ee6c
___________________________________________________________________
 
45h34jh53k4j - 2 hours ago
Oh no! The emperor's has no clothes!
 
Animats - 1 hours ago
This mixing ramped up around the same time as the price did.
Etherium was around $8 at the beginning of 2017, where it had been
for years. By midyear it was in the $300-$400 range.Is this mixing
somehow involved with a scheme to pump the price?
 
  Taniwha - 20 minutes ago
  Doesn't this screw up people's taxes, making them liable for
  realised capital gains, and also making them completely screwed
  if the value of the currency goes back down again
 
  Slartie - 1 hours ago
  I would say the relationship is this one:First, Ethereum was
  found to be the perfect Ponzi scheme platform by dubious ?ICO?
  initiators.Then, early investors made a huge bunch of money on
  these ICOs.Then the price skyrocketed, as more people wanted some
  of that easy ICO money.This in turn made the mixing services
  insanely popular, as all of those ICOs had to cash out, and
  knowing that their business was of dubious nature, many decided
  to obfuscate the target addresses of their ether via mixers to
  protect either OTC buyers or their personal accounts on exchanges
  from being linked with the ICO addresses.
 
  NwmG - 1 hours ago
  I would say it is not actually a mixer. The point you are making
  actually points more towards them being temp addresses for
  exchanges. More people entering the market on exchanges, higher
  volume in exchanges, higher volume in this tempwallet "mixer"
 
alexjray - 27 minutes ago
?Ethereum transactions? and ?quantity of ETH transacted? are two
very different things. This title (and article) is deceiving.Please
see Vitalik Buterin response to this before
reading.https://medium.com/@VitalikButerin/i-think-this-article-
real...
 
dahdum - 1 hours ago
Aren't these the temporary deposit addresses that exchanges give
out? You deposit and then they sweep the balance to their hot/cold
wallets as necessary?Also the ReplaySafeSplit and related contracts
were due to the ETH/ETC split, you had to move your coins to be
safe.I see no evidence of a "mixer" being the cause.
 
  oldstrangers - 1 hours ago
  This is exactly what it is.
 
  Nition - 1 hours ago
  I was wondering that too. I know at least some exchanges (maybe
  even all the major ones?) use temporary addresses like that. I
  wonder when they started doing that. There's the huge spike in
  "mixer" activity from March this year onward, but that's also
  when Ethereum gained a lot of value. Maybe it's just a lot more
  trading started happening on the exchanges?
 
    dahdum - 1 hours ago
    They have as long as I can remember, but the volume has
    skyrocketed over the past year along with more exchanges.I
    don't understand how the author could group all temporary
    addresses, see the top inputs/outputs as all exchanges, and
    then claim some nefarious mixer was responsible.
 
  darawk - 1 hours ago
  That was my first thought. Everything they describe sounds
  exactly like temporary exchange deposit addresses. And the
  transaction volume associated with them sounds about like what
  i'd expect.
 
  NwmG - 1 hours ago
  Yeah, this was my thought as well. 67% of all ETH transaction
  volume in a mixer seems pretty high, particularly when you
  consider the volume traded on each of the exchanges
 
XR0CSWV3h3kZWg - 1 hours ago
The article doesn't seem to support the claim.
 
ChrisClark - 1 hours ago
Good to clarify, it's actually 68% of the value, the amount
transferred.  They are only about 10% of the number of
transactions.
 
shemnon42 - 2 hours ago
Is the story that 68% of the traffic is naked laundering or that
68% of the traffic is people buying into ICO that are not already
enfranchised in ethereum?
 
  [deleted]
 
  mesozoic - 1 hours ago
  Could be laundering but even with that you wouldn't want all of
  the source currency to be illegitimate so only a fraction of it
  would be. So it would probably cover both cases.
 
  Alex3917 - 1 hours ago
  It's not laundering, it's spoofing by some of the earliest
  Ethereum holders who are trading with themselves on the exchanges
  to create the appearance of volume and liquidity to drive up the
  value of their coins.
 
    cslarson - 34 minutes ago
    Oh right.
 
    charlesdm - 16 minutes ago
    Can't be all spoofing though? That seems a lot / too much?
 
seibelj - 2 hours ago
It's an ETH mixer, it helps you obfuscate ETH, the same exists in
BTC and all other crypto currency systems without inherent privacy.
 
  k__ - 1 hours ago
  Could you elaborate? (I'm a n00b)Are there alternatives to BTC
  and ETH that have inherent privacy?How do Feds not crack down on
  these "mixers"?
 
    uncoder0 - 1 hours ago
    There are other coins focused on privacy Monero is my favorite
    privacy focused crypto at the moment.
 
    dijit - 1 hours ago
    RE: your question about inherent privacy, there is Monero (XMR)
    and ZCash which implement transactional privacy in different
    ways.In my opinion XMR/Monero are the only implementation to do
    it all the way through, so it's what I prefer but as with all
    things, you should research what the differences are and which
    is better for you. ZCash has a higher value per coin right now
    and is probably more accepted than XMR/Monero.
 
      the_stc - 1 hours ago
      Except no large systems support receiving shielded zcash
      transactions because of the CPU and RAM involved. They
      recently made some improvements, but it still takes many
      seconds of solid CPU time. Maybe in the future it'll be fast
      enough to be practical and they can make it the default.
 
    XR0CSWV3h3kZWg - 1 hours ago
    zcash, monero and dash are the biggest that have inherent
    privacy.
 
      the_stc - 1 hours ago
      ZCash is ideal, theoretically. If they get the performance
      amped up so that private transactions don't take forever, it
      could really work cause they could make privacy mandatory.
      Though a 10% tax of all coins is rather questionable. The CEO
      of the company did say he felt zcash could be made traceable
      enough to be uninteresting to money launderers, whatever that
      means. Sounds like the opposite of fungible.Monero's less
      theoretically secure, and indeed, there's no info on how to
      safely "launder" coins through Monero. Ringsize is very
      small, at 5. But it seems to be a proper community effort and
      probably the best contender right now.Dash is mired in
      mishaps, from its inception and instamine as Darkcoin. A
      single user or group of users hold magical keys that can undo
      24 hours of blocks. They have centralized nodes and the
      mixing scheme isn't even theoretically secure.
 
        lawn - 1 hours ago
        I should add that Monero doesn't use mixing in the same
        sense. The ring size works so that you cannot see which of
        the different choices is the correct output until spent.
        This is different from having the participants swap coins
        as you do when mixing. The ring size isn't directly
        comparable to the number of mixing participants or mixing
        rounds as the former isn't susceptible to blockchain
        analysis. You can only make probabilistic guesses or IP
        tracing.There is no "official" recommendation of how to
        securely launder coins in Monero. What you can do is to
        send the coins to yourself a number of times using the
        default ringsize or "churning".
 
          the_stc - 56 minutes ago
          Sending coins to yourself, aka churning, might not work
          so well after all, according to the latest MRL report.
          They say:" We at the Lab previously thought that one
          possible solution to knacc's described attack would be
          churning, where one sends funds to oneself multiple times
          before using at a merchant. Unfortunately, this leads to
          chains of self-referential transactions, which leave an
          undesirable and identifiable statistical signal. "Now the
          follow-up I've gotten says that this just means you can't
          churn too quickly. There is still no analysis of how
          often to churn, how long you need to wait, and on and on,
          until you're safe. The Monero wallets offer no way to
          manage your inputs either, so if you ever re-use a wallet
          (exchange->WalletA->WalletB a couple times) you'll leave
          even more of an trace.So the number one idea that springs
          to mind, Exchange->Monero->Exchange, might be a worst-
          case scenario where you can easily be linked with a high
          probability. Especially when the approximate input time
          is known.For instance, if you know a target exchanged
          Bitcoin in a certain transaction, you can simply trace
          all possible chains from that output and see when one
          hits an exchange, prioritizing shortest first: if an
          exchange output goes right back to an exchange, that's
          probably enough to get a warrant or targeted
          investigation.Furthermore, an attacker could make a bunch
          of transactions so other transactions use known inputs,
          reducing effective ringsize even more. This wouldn't be
          very expensive at current volumes.Even still, Monero
          still seems far ahead of competition. My biggest concern
          is that they don't put any sort of disclaimers, and
          incorrectly state it's untraceable. This will get people
          into trouble. The Tor Project does a far better job of
          being clear with the risks and shortcomings. The Monero
          community, mostly, seems to just advertise as if
          everything was solved. That plus the ridiculously low
          ring sizes feel rather irresponsible.
 
  cgb223 - 1 hours ago
  But since its still on a permanent immutable blockchain, couldn't
  someone still trace Bitcoin/Eth transactions with perfect
  accuracy?
 
    grey-area - 1 hours ago
    Yes
 
    mesozoic - 1 hours ago
    Sort of. It seems to me though that once you've missed coins
    from many sources in various ways 90+ times then the coins are
    distributed in parts to many end recipients its then very hard
    to to say if some fraction of a coin came had any one source.
    If I were designing a way to launder cryptocoins that may or
    may not have a questionable source I think this is pretty much
    what I'd come up with.
 
    ringaroundthetx - 1 hours ago
    You can play blockchain sleuth all you want, but you cannot
    guarantee that you are following the same owner's transactions.
 
    aeturnum - 1 hours ago
    Yes - mostly. The idea behind a mixer is this:1. Your
    transaction goes into their address2. Their address is always
    transferring money to accounts.3. Sometime after you pay them,
    some amount, not quite the same, leaves their address to an
    address you control, but which has no established connection to
    you.So an observer can see:1. That you put money into the
    mixer.2. The full list of addresses the mixer payed 'out' to
    (very long).Which allows them to say if an address has "mixed"
    money but not to determine which account is connected to which
    person. If you're careful and you don't transfer any coins to
    addresses linked to your 'real world' persona, it becomes
    difficult to trace the account containing the 'mixed' coins to
    you (though trivial to identify it as coming from the mixer).
 
      the_stc - 1 hours ago
      A well designed mixer would not be so easy to detect. In a
      perfect world, you'd have matching clients all the time, and
      the only contamination is the fee being siphoned off. If the
      fee is managed well it could be very difficult to determine
      coins that went or came from the mixer.In reality, you
      probably need to batch a few customers together: 10 customers
      putting in 1 BTC, 1 customer putting in 10. But these don't
      need to be long-lived groups, if the mixer has the volume. So
      "their address" would only be the same for a few customers.
      An attacker would need to constantly make transactions to
      determine the addresses involved.Most mixers give you
      completely "clean coins": That is there's no transaction
      chain from your inputs to your outputs. So they are probably
      doing some sort of system similar to what I describe.
 
        jacquesm - 34 minutes ago
        The proper term for this kind of activity is money
        laundering.
 
    Karunamon - 1 hours ago
    Kinda, the problem is once you've moved through a couple
    wallets (many wallets, in the case of the mixing services), it
    becomes very hard to tell the difference between one person
    moving their coins around, and one person paying another
    person.    A --> B       A --> B --> C --> ...--> Z  Pretend
    you know who A is already. Who are B through X? Is the person
    in control of A also in control of Z? Or any of the other
    wallets? These are answers the blockchain doesn't give you.
 
    imaginenore - 1 hours ago
    No. If wallets A and B send 1ETH each to Z, and then Z sends
    1ETH to X and 1ETH to Y, you already can't tell whose money is
    where.
 
      salgernon - 32 minutes ago
      Wouldn't an interested party just assume A and B are both
      guilty and given the current taste for asset forfeiture laws,
      require proof of the origination of the funds?  At one point
      does it not become possible to "capture" people this way? 10k
      wallets? 100k?  I may be too simple to understand the math
      here, but in the end you've got people with guns to deal
      with.
 
    lawn - 1 hours ago
    Yes. Here's a paper claiming to trace through various mixing
    services.https://arxiv.org/pdf/1709.02489.pdf
 
    dsp1234 - 1 hours ago
    Let's say you hand me a $100 bill, and that you have marked
    that bill.  I then take that bill to a bank and ask for 3 $20
    bills and 4 $10 bills.  The bank takes that $100 and puts into
    the vault, and takes out the bills I asked for out of the
    vault.  Later, someone comes in with $100 worth of bills, and
    asks for a $100 bill.  The bank goes to the vault and gets the
    marked $100 and gives it to that customer.Tracking the bill
    doesn't help, because as soon as it's in the bank, what happens
    to it (and how it's exchanged), is hidden from you.  Mixers
    work the same way.
 
      dahdum - 1 hours ago
      You're right, but the article didn't find a mixer. They found
      the temporary deposit addresses every exchange uses and then
      wrote a FUD article to drive traffic and awareness of their
      sketchy ICO.
 
ve55 - 1 hours ago
Why is the link at the top of this article ('cyber?Fund') to
https://cyber.fund/system/Paragon, a page for 'Paragon', a very
shifty high-budget ICO?Given the other things Paragon has paid big
bucks for (anything you can imagine, from paying Youtubers 5
figures per video to get their subscribers to 'invest' in them to
paying for mass reddit vote manipulation to buying very expensive
ads and sponsorship programs to lying about their company model,
CEO, etc), it seems really out of place to me that this article
links to them as the first link.
 
  the_common_man - 11 minutes ago
  ICOs are the new nigerian banks