GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-25) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Street View of 80s NYC
158 points by mwexler
http://80s.nyc/
___________________________________________________________________
 
52-6F-62 - 4 hours ago
Nicely done! This is a great idea! I hope those photos from the 30s
are digitized so they can receive the same treatment
 
  unclewaltr - 3 hours ago
  From what I've seen of the 1930s/40s tax photos, they're much
  better quality as far as framing. Not sure if this is the case
  across the board, but the copies I looked up were pretty
  consistently better. But you have to either go in to the
  municipal building to look at them or order them online.
 
martijn_himself - 34 minutes ago
How appropriate. I was just watching Simon and Garfunkel perform
'The Boxer' in Central Park, 1981 on YouTube.
 
mttpgn - 3 hours ago
First thing I noticed was the ReactJS favicon...
 
  bdon - 2 hours ago
  Good catch, thanks. I use Safari so didn't notice... favicon is
  updated now.
 
kwoff - 2 hours ago
I don't know much about NYC, but I've read "The Bonfire of the
Vanities" (1987 novel; heard the movie sucked...). Anyone plot key
points in that? (for example: the car scene of Sherman and Maria,
the court house in the Bronx, the Park Avenue apartments). If not,
whaddaya whaddaya?
 
colordrops - 4 hours ago
Seems that there would be quite a bit of historical value to
getting everyone to digitize their personal photos and upload them
to a shared repository.  Has there already been such an effort?
 
  [deleted]
 
  rmason - 3 hours ago
  In Detroit they collected family movies taken around the date of
  the 1967 Detroit riots and created a movie.http://www.freep.com/s
  tory/entertainment/movies/2017/02/13/d...
 
  KGIII - 4 hours ago
  Not that I know of. Without some way of knowing where and when
  they're from, I'm not sure how useful the data would be. It'd
  make an interesting project.During WWII the UK government (maybe
  the US? I'm unable to find a reference but the search terms are
  pretty generic) requested pictures and postcards from people
  who'd taken recent trips into Europe. They wanted them for
  intelligence reasons - I think it was the UK.That's the closest
  thing I can think of, where there's been a request for massive
  photos. They wanted people to include information about locations
  and dates, as I recall.Someone here might be a historian and know
  more details than I do.But, it seems like it'd be a large pile of
  data and work. Unless they knew when and where they came from,
  I'm not sure how much value they'd have - other than aesthetics.
 
    toomuchtodo - 3 hours ago
    > But, it seems like it'd be a large pile of data and work.
    Unless they knew when and where they came from, I'm not sure
    how much value they'd have - other than aesthetics.You're
    right, its a huge pile of work. Without the geotag and temporal
    EXIF data, you're relying on machine vision/structure from
    motion (think https://mapillary.com) to rebuild 3D scenes
    solely from image data.https://help.mapillary.com/hc/en-
    us/articles/115001770329-Ma..."Mapillary uses a technology
    called Structure from Motion (SfM) to create and reconstruct
    places in 3D. By matching points between different images, SfM
    is able to locate the point in a three-dimensional space and
    therefore determine its location on the map. The more images
    there are available for a specific point, the more accurately
    it can be reconstructed. In addition, SfM creates the kind of
    smooth transitions between images that you can see in the
    Mapillary viewer?again, provided that images have been taken
    within close proximity with enough overlap between them.We also
    run semantic segmentation on the images. This means that the
    computer tries to understand what is in the image and assigns a
    category tag to each pixel. That enables us to detect different
    areas in the images (such as buildings, pedestrians, cars
    etc.). Semantic segmentation together with 3D reconstruction
    enables us to extract 3D positions of objects such as traffic
    signs and display them on the map. You can get more detailed
    information on what is currently available on our product
    page."Disclaimer: No relation, just dig their tech  (they're
    using machine vision to build world models for self-driving
    cars, using crowd sourced imagery).
 
      KGIII - 3 hours ago
      When I typed my reply, I briefly considered if AI/ML/NN might
      help but then I thought about it. I don't think there will be
      enough training data and I suspect that existing reference
      points would be vastly different, and made even more
      difficult to use by the lack of resolution.But... If it had
      some initial training done by hand, and by people including
      what dates and locations they know, maybe it could work
      backwards? It'd still end up being a HUGE amount of data and
      the compute power for that would probably be obscene.Which,
      of course, means I think it's an excellent idea and that
      someone should do this. I can't even begin to imagine the
      costs. This might just be the best idea ever, or the worst.
 
        toomuchtodo - 3 hours ago
        Sounds like fun! I know the Mapillary folks from
        interviewing with them. I think it'd just be a matter of me
        paying for the spot instances for the compute time. I'm
        going to ask!
 
          KGIII - 2 hours ago
          And the data acquisition.It does tie into a strange idea
          that I've been tossing about for the past decade.A
          cluster of used cell phones. They're easy to power,
          probably free for the taking, and might make for big
          computing while just using something that'd normally be
          thrown away.My original idea was SETI or one of the
          unfolding@home type projects, but something like this
          might make for a good project.Alas, I'm way too lazy (and
          not qualified) to do this. Laziness is one of the perks
          of retirement.
 
  pizzetta - 3 hours ago
  This is similar to this one for SF http://www.oldsf.org/Looks
  like the NYC one has more coverage though.
 
    lonewolf_ninja - 3 hours ago
    They also have a similar site for New York:
    https://www.oldnyc.org/
 
zonotope - 4 hours ago
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15260897
 
  [deleted]
 
dmix - 3 hours ago
The South Bronx really was a war-zone.http://80s.nyc/#show/40.8265/
-73.9080http://80s.nyc/#show/40.8107/-73.9180http://80s.nyc/#show/4
0.8188/-73.9217http://80s.nyc/#show/40.8229/-73.9167http://80s.nyc/
#show/40.8102/-73.9194http://80s.nyc/#show/40.8152/-73.9165All of
those rent-control incentivized arsons... empty lots with garbage
everywhere... dogs running around with no owners visible.Edit:
correction, while rent-control played a big role in Brooklyn's
housing abandonment rate, South Bronx faced a variety of factors in
addition to rent control:> For example, housing abandonment in the
South Bronx, probably the most devastated area in the entire city,
can be plausibly related to the economics of an obsolete housing
stock. The area was one of the most densely populated in the
country in the 1940s and 1950s, and the housing stock consists
almost entirely of five- and six-story walkups. As population
density decreased, fifth- and sixth-story walkup apartments became
unrentable at prices sufficient for sound building maintenance,
irrespective of rent controls. Arson eventually became the owners'
only financially rewarding alternative.http://www.crainsnewyork.com
/article/20100610/BLOGS01/306109...
 
  guelo - 2 hours ago
  Another perspective on the rash of South Bronx arsons is that it
  was caused by bad data science. See story here:
  http://nypost.com/2010/05/16/why-the-bronx-burned/
 
    dmix - 2 hours ago
    Thanks, I came across that article too. I've included an edit,
    there were many factors involved in the South Bronx blight
    (economic and political), but yes fire stations shutting down
    in neighbourhoods with less political pull was certainly one of
    them.The fires ended up ruining entire neighbourhoods due to
    the poor city response times, but the simple fact is many of
    them were started due to landlord arson or from poor property
    maintenance by the owners.
 
      akgerber - 1 hours ago
      The incentives weren't just rent control but also white-
      flight population decline leading to decreased rent rolls
      leading to reduced property valuations that weren't yet
      reflected in insurance valuations.And much of that white
      flight was due to the Federal government funding interstates
      to the suburbs and subsidizing mortgage loans for whites only
      that made suburban houses cheaper for white middle-class
      families to live in than urban apartments.
      http://www.bostonfairhousing.org/timeline/1934-1968-FHA-
      Redl...The South Bronx was also entirely redlined by the HOLC
      in the 1930s, rendering it ineligible for mortgage loans for
      decades: https://dsl.richmond.edu/panorama/redlining/#loc=12/
      40.8328/...
 
        dmix - 1 hours ago
        > And much of that white flight was due to the Federal
        government funding interstates to the suburbs and
        subsidizing mortgage loans for whites only that made
        suburban houses cheaper for white middle-class families to
        live in than urban apartments. .That study is for
        "1934?1968". The civil rights act (1969) made that type of
        discrimination illegal and included provisions to
        incentivize the reduction of segregation, yet I've read
        that nearly 50yrs later housing segregation is still today
        higher (or as high) than before the civil rights act.I'm
        sure that federal policy played a big role in white flight
        but I'm curious why it hasn't reversed despite these
        changes... there must be other forces still at play here,
        that or we're seeing a multi-generational side-effect of
        bad policy.But regardless it's interesting to think that so
        much government policy did the exact opposite of help the
        poor at federal, state, and city level... from city
        budgeting of fire stations to mortgage incentives to rent
        control and zoning laws, etc.
 
  notjustanymike - 1 hours ago
  Looks like Baltimore.
 
  nether - 15 minutes ago
  Looks like Detroit today.
 
  e40 - 3 hours ago
  One of the most stunning parts of the movie Koyaanisqatsi are the
  demolition of builds in the South Bronx (I'm pretty sure they're
  there, can someone confirm?).  And, the scenes from the movie
  Wolfen look very similar to the above scenes.
 
    bdon - 2 hours ago
    Those were in St. Louis,
    MOhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pruitt?Igoe
 
      e40 - 1 hours ago
      Hence the name of the song.  (smacks side of head) Thanks.
 
  zghst - 1 hours ago
  Reminds me of St. Louis today, it's completely hollowed out with
  dilapidated buildings everywhere. Sad.
 
    zeamaize - 1 hours ago
    Except St Louis isn't coming back.
 
  StanislavPetrov - 1 hours ago
  Have you been there lately?  Fewer dogs but still similar.
 
apaprocki - 1 hours ago
From having browsed through the tax lot photos in the municipal
archives from prior generations, it would be fun to see a split
view where you browse around both the 1940s and 1980s at the same
time.If you browse around 80s Williamsburg photos it is not a place
you would want to be. Now every one of those lots would be a
minimum of $1M, with waterfront lots in the tens of millions. Pays
to play the long game.
 
  guelo - 15 minutes ago
  In the long game we're all dead.
 
sotojuan - 1 hours ago
My building and the pharmacy near me are there and look the same!
 
subdane - 1 minutes ago
There's an AR project in here, I tell ya!