GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-06) - page 2 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Facebook says it sold political ads to Russian company during 2016
election
104 points by aaronbrethorst
https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/facebook-says-it-sold-po...
t-sold-political-ads-to-russian-company-during-2016-election/2017/09/06/32f01fd2-931e-11e7-89fa-bb822a46da5b_story.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
chvid - 59 minutes ago
In the context of the 2016 election 100.000 usd is a tiny amount.
 
  akhilcacharya - 27 minutes ago
  In the context of web ads it's not insignificant.
 
Ajedi32 - 1 hours ago
Out of curiosity, are there any laws on the books right now which
are meant to prevent this sort of thing?For example, let's assume a
foreign government decided to purchase ads either backing or
attacking a US political candidate, and they were completely overt
about it. (No hiding behind shell companies or transferring funds
anonymously; completely out in the open.) Are there any laws or
systems currently in place which would stop them from doing that?
 
  vkou - 1 hours ago
  And, as a related question - should there be? What about a
  foreign corporation? A foreign corporation with a domestic
  presence? A domestic corporation? None of these groups are
  beholden to the public interest.
 
    pamqzl - 1 hours ago
    Or just a foreign individual?I'm a foreign individual who went
    around making comments on the US election... what's the
    difference between me doing it privately and a company doing
    it?
 
      LeifCarrotson - 47 minutes ago
      As much as America would like to think their laws apply
      across the globe, they don't actually have jurisdiction over
      you. There's nothing they can do to prevent you from talking
      about the campaign.They do have jurisdiction over the
      candidate and campaign you endorse, though. If you contacted
      your candidate and offered them money or services in the hope
      that they could use your help to get elected, and they
      accepted your offer they would be guilty.  You wouldn't
      be.Unfortunately, it seems like a fairly impotent law if all
      you have to do as a foreign national with an interest in the
      election is to support a candidate without their endorsement.
 
        dragonwriter - 5 minutes ago
        > As much as America would like to think their laws apply
        across the globe, they don't actually have jurisdiction
        over you.You might want to check with Humberto ?lvarez-
        Macha?n (acquitted, sure, but not because the law didn't
        apply to him) or Manuel Noriega about that.
 
  makomk - 45 minutes ago
  Well, it's important to bear in mind that most of these ads
  supposedly didn't back or attack a particular candidate, and that
  banning foreign funding of political and social activism of this
  kind would be a very Russian thing to do. Claiming they're
  foreign agents is one of the Russian government's favourite
  tactics for raiding and shutting down inconvenient political NGOs
  and activists. Frankly, I wouldn't entirely put it past them to
  fund these ads partly to bait out something they could use to
  justify their own domestic crackdowns and spin US criticism as
  hypocrasy.
 
  AaronFriel - 1 hours ago
  There are laws against foreign nationals to provide a "thing of
  value" to a US political campaign. This is obviously a difficult
  thing to tease out. My source on this is Eugene Volokh, a law
  professor and First Amendment attorney:
  https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-
  conspiracy/wp/201...The fundamental question then is: was this
  intentional on behalf of the foreign agent to provide a "thing of
  value" to a US political campaign, and/or did a political
  candidate or campaign solicit this?
 
  sigmar - 1 hours ago
  My understanding is no, this is legal. But this would be illegal
  if a U.S. political campaign knew about and facilitated these ad
  buys, as then it would be a contribution. Source:
  https://transition.fec.gov/pages/brochures/foreign.shtml#Pro...
 
  JamesCoyne - 1 hours ago
  The Federal Election Commission would have something to say:"The
  Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) prohibits any foreign
  national from contributing, donating or spending funds in
  connection with any federal, state, or local election in the
  United States, either directly or indirectly.  It is also
  unlawful to help foreign nationals violate that ban or to
  solicit, receive or accept contributions or donations from them.
  Persons who knowingly and willfully engage in these activities
  may be subject to fines and/or imprisonment." [0]The definition
  of "foreign national" is quite broad.How this works with regards
  to PAC contributions is unclear to me.[0]
  https://transition.fec.gov/pages/brochures/foreign.shtml
 
    LeifCarrotson - 54 minutes ago
    > Persons who knowingly and willfully engage in these
    activities may be subject to fines and/or imprisonment.Who are
    these "persons"?It can't logically be the foreign nationals who
    are attempting to help a campaign. They're not under the
    jurisdiction of US federal law.It also can't logically be the
    candidates. Otherwise, the obvious tactic would be to provide
    overt, unrequested aid to the opposition candidate(s) and send
    them all to jail.I'm not sure it can be Facebook or other
    Internet sides. It is true that Facebook is a US company, but
    the content on their sites is protected under the DMCA safe
    harbor exemption. And then the law wouldn't handle the case of
    sites not under US ownership.FECA dates back to the 70s, and it
    doesn't seem to do a good job of handling the globalization of
    the Internet.  If someone from overseas looked at the facts
    themselves and, without talking to a candidate, just plastered
    Google and Facebook and YouTube and Twitter with endorsement of
    one candidate and criticism of another, is it reasonable to try
    to stop them?
 
      dragonwriter - 8 minutes ago
      > It can't logically be the foreign nationals who are
      attempting to help a campaign. They're not under the
      jurisdiction of US federal law.Criminal violations of US laws
      whose prohibition is not expressly territorially restricted
      that occur outside of the US are successfully prosecuted in
      US courts with some frequency. Bringing people before the
      court for prosecution may be challenging where extradition
      isn't an option, but outright kidnapping from a foreign
      country or even full-scale military military invasion to do
      so have occurred.
 
  elipsey - 1 hours ago
  TFA:"Under federal law and Federal Election Commission
  regulations, both foreign nationals and foreign governments are
  prohibited from making contributions or spending money to
  influence a federal, state or local election in the United
  States. The ban includes independent expenditures made in
  connection with an election.Those banned from such spending
  include foreign citizens, foreign governments, foreign political
  parties, foreign corporations, foreign associations and foreign
  partnerships, according to the FEC."
 
    [deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
ThomPete - 8 minutes ago
"Facebook officials reported that they traced the ad sales,
totaling $100,000, to a Russian ?troll farm? with a history of
pushing pro-Kremlin propaganda, these people said."Excuse my
ignorance but isn't $100K chicken feed?
 
rocktronica - 52 minutes ago
Regardless of legality, it will be interesting to see how this is
spun if/when Zuckerberg runs for public office.
 
pjc50 - 1 hours ago
I guess Citizens United doesn't just apply to citizens.
 
  Shivetya - 1 hours ago
  Citizens United was a good ruling because Congress and both
  political parties have been doing their damn best to limit the
  number of ways money can get into politics unless it is to
  them.How? Simple, donations under $200 per person do not need be
  revealed until they exceed that number. Also taking foreign
  donations without proper tracking and the ease of generating new
  cc numbers / names works as well. However the number one method
  they use is exploiting campaign fundraising events where they can
  rake in millions. With the clout and friends in business how can
  a third party or anyone compete against it?So while there are
  issues with money in politics all attempts to limit it have
  simply been done to protect the two parties who hold near
  absolute power.
 
sumoboy - 1 hours ago
Why would Facebook discriminate where ad $ revenue is coming from?
Twitter, Instagram, doesn't matter, money is money.
 
  dragonwriter - 1 hours ago
  Well, first, there's law prohibiting foreign-sponsored activity
  of this sort, and prohibits assisting foreign parties in
  violating the prohibition.And, second, they were channelled
  through false-flag accounts and pages, which violates Facebook's
  policies regarding authenticity.
 
  eroo - 1 hours ago
  Because foreign agents buying political ads violates US federal
  law
 
    trhway - 59 minutes ago
    and if that Russian company was an agent of Russian government
    ( 101 chances out of 100 that it was, i.e. any reasonable
    person would think so :) then FB doing that company's bidding
    was acting as an agent of Russian government, and doing so
    without registration as such a foreign government agent sounds
    to me (not a lawyer though) like a violation of another item of
    the federal law. At least it looks like  doing such thing was
    a violation before the current administration - now they seem
    to accept "retroactive" registrations, at least from their own
    folks - https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/former-trump-
    campaig...
 
      havetocharge - 46 minutes ago
      You can take your assertions further -- every Russian,
      national or not, is an agent of the Russian government with
      101% certainty at that. Furthermore, everyone who associates
      with Russians is an agent as well, with a reasonably high
      degree of confidence.
 
    foota - 1 hours ago
    For the seller of the ad time or for the buyer?
 
    spaceflunky - 1 hours ago
    >Because foreign agents buying political ads violates US
    federal lawWRONG. Nothing prohibits foreign entities from
    buying their own political ads.http://fortune.com/2017/07/12
    /us-election-meddling-online-ad...
 
      [deleted]
 
      bduerst - 49 minutes ago
      You're both right.  Sounds like a law that hasn't been
      updated yet for online ads.>The laws that prohibit foreign
      nationals from spending money to influence U.S. elections do
      not prevent them from lawfully buying some kinds of political
      ads on Facebook and other online networks
 
      dragonwriter - 32 minutes ago
      While in one sense true, the Fortune article seems to be
      reading the word ?television? (or perhaps ?audio or
      audiovisual content?) into the phrase ?cable, broadcast, or
      satellite? as a distribution mechanism when it is not, in
      fact, present where that phrase is used in FECA, as amended
      (FECA does have radio and TV-specific provisions, and they
      expressly name radio and TV, and they aren't the ones of
      interest here.) Absent case law to the contrary, which is not
      cited, it would seem by it's plain language to cover most
      real electronic media including the internet (advertising on
      a isolated RFC 1149 network would not be covered, of course,
      nor would ads in plenty of pre-telegraph ?old media? like
      dead-tree-only newspapers.)
 
Clubber - 37 minutes ago
>Most of the ads focused on pumping politically divisive issues
such as gun rights and immigration fears, as well as gay rights and
racial discrimination.When I read this I thought that this is what
the US press does every single day wither it's WaPo or Limbaugh.
It's all about selling fear and division. There's no longer nuance,
no longer presenting both sides of an argument. It's all this is
good or this is evil.
 
dymk - 1 hours ago
Facebook's blog post on the matter:
https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2017/09/information-operations-...
 
  baybal2 - 1 hours ago
  ... and they do this while the were openly taking money from
  Russian/KGB campaigners round 2010, dispatching campaign
  consultants and overall trreating them as first tier clients.
  Same was true of Google in Russia, while they still had hopes of
  somehow greasing hands with the establishment. They evacuated the
  most valuable staff out of Russia around 2015 to Switzerland,
  when they finally gave up. I still do remember them quitely
  delisting online resources with corruption exposures circa 2007,
  that were reappearing with simple reversal of word order.They
  may've been just "probing where the water is shallow" in 2010
  with "seemingly innocent" think tank drivel and consulting buys,
  and then went full throttle when it did matter the most.American
  top C-Levels, officials, 3 letter agency employees, and other
  American  beau monde all have that "smart, sophisticated,
  brilliant, but damn naive" note in their personalities. All such
  types do remind me of people who are "trying to win in a casino,"
  while having "I know what I'm doing" look on their face. They
  can't win there, it not their league.To prevail, Americans need
  to overhaul their political establishment and institutes of power
  with virtuous competent people
 
IdontRememberIt - 1 hours ago
I am in Switzerland and I keep seeing suggestions for "Anti trump"
groups (None of my friends are part of them). Why?
 
balance_factor - 1 hours ago
As it is rarely mentioned in the US media, I'd just note that the
US pretty openly interferes in Russian elections, and has been
doing so for a long time.  It's curious this is virtually never
mentioned amidst all the accusations of Russia involving itself in
US elections.There are many tentacles to the US octopus, for
starters you can look at an organization created by and funded by
the US congress, the soi disant National Endowment for Democracy.
They have a conference opening next week containing some of the
people the US has been using to interfere in Russian elections (
https://www.ned.org/events/prospects-for-russias-democratic-... ).
 
  dragonwriter - 20 minutes ago
  > I'd just note that the US pretty openly interferes in Russian
  electionsIf Russia had meaningful elections to interfere in to
  start with, that would concern me a little bit as an American,
  and a lot if I was a Russian.Since Russia doesn't, however...
 
  CardenB - 18 minutes ago
  This is because it's usually discussed with the idea that Russia
  had actually compromised electronic voting systems in the US.
  That's different from trying to strengthen a political campaign
  in another country.
 
  spaceseaman - 59 minutes ago
  > virtually never mentionedI (anecdotally) hear this tidbit in
  every comments section relating to Russia's involvement in the
  U.S. election. Almost as if it's a common talking point.Reminds
  me a lot of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WhataboutismEDIT: ...
  And so a conversation was effectively derailed and nothing was
  gained. Arguing about the validity of Whataboutism or who is
  doing it isn't the point. It's a deflection technique that works
  in spite of you calling it out.
 
    raquo - 51 minutes ago
    It's the line that Putin and Lavrov (foreign minister) have
    been pushing since forever: "you westerners are no better than
    us, stop shaming us for the shady things that we do". That's an
    easy way to keep your population happy ? tell them that life is
    no better in other countries. Corruption is everywhere, police
    state is everywhere, etc. And most Russians believe that.
 
      bitJericho - 16 minutes ago
      Well it's true in the us, Russia, china, Australia. That's
      not everywhere but that is quite a lot of ground.
 
        Retric - 4 minutes ago
        Russia does not have actual meaningful elections.  That's a
        fairly fundamental difference.
 
      marksomnian - 28 minutes ago
      Whataboutwhataboutism-ism.
 
    aleyan - 4 minutes ago
    > WhataboutismI (anecdotally) hear this tidbit in every
    comments section relating to Russia. Almost as if it's a common
    talking point.Reminds me a lot of
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin%27s_law
 
    mc32 - 49 minutes ago
    Sure, but what about it?  Does it not invalidate the basis for
    complaining, or at least the moral high ground, if you do the
    same thing?  Of course on some level it can be a legalistic
    tool where while you might have done something illegal you can
    sue the other party for having done the same, like a
    countersuit.I'm almost willing to bet that if Merkel was found
    to have interfered on behalf of Bernie, we'd hear some musings,
    but not nearly the vehemence we hear about alleged Russian
    interference (that particular accusation seems to have become
    muted recently, however).
 
      Clubber - 28 minutes ago
      We discovered Merkel was spied on by the NSA. I believe she
      had her phone tapped. That was pretty big but it blew over.
 
    stevenwoo - 1 minutes ago
    On the one hand, a better beef for Russia would be the US
    military intervention on Soviet soil for the anti Bolshevik
    forces in 1917, on the other hand, that's a incredibly long
    time to hold a grudge/cold war, though Iran's theocracy looks
    like it's going to milk US interference in their country for a
    couple more generations, too.The other side of this is Russian
    involvement in the US/Western Europe seems to follow many of
    the key points of
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foundations_of_Geopolitics where
    Putin has already though direct military action or political
    involvement, accomplished the goals of distancing the UK from
    Europe, made progress on retaking Ukraine, allied with Iran,
    gotten a windfall with Turkey being run by an authoritarian and
    distancing itself from the West, and diminished the US in the
    eyes of the world with the election of Trump.
 
    CaptSpify - 25 minutes ago
    Interesting as this is the first I've heard about it (anecdotal
    as well).Though I admit most of my news on this comes from non-
    comment based news sources (tv, etc)
 
      dclowd9901 - 16 minutes ago
      The US has a long and sordid history in interfering in the
      political affairs of other countries.That said, our
      government doesn't subjugate dissenters or lock up
      journalists. They let our corporations do that.
 
        knz - 4 minutes ago
        The US alone? Or every major political power in human
        history?And if you don't believe Russia is actively running
        interference in other countries via "little green men" etc
        then I'd encourage you to read more about the current
        political affairs of nation states like Ukraine or Georgia.
        Or about a little historical event called the iron curtain
        and it's associated revolutions.Many horrible things have
        been done in the name of Western hegemony but let's not
        pretend these actions occur without provocation from other
        geopolitical actors.
 
    korzun - 21 minutes ago
    In most cultures, you don't criticize somebody for something
    while doing the exact opposite.Whataboutism does not apply to
    90% of conversations but don't tell that to people who think
    they are smart by bringing it up.Whataboutism:A) 'You
    interfered with our elections!!' B) 'You bombed a children
    hospital! What about that?'NOT Whataboutism:A) 'You interfered
    with our elections!! YOU HACKED OUR ELECTIONS!!! PUTIN ORDERED
    TO STEAL OUR VOTES!!! B) 'That's great, you have been doing the
    same thing for decades all over the world. Mind shutting up?'
 
      bllguo - 9 minutes ago
      Sorry, but I fail to see the difference between your
      contrived examples. And I'm amused that you think people are
      being pretentious for bringing up "whataboutism," when the
      term itself is arguably a colloquialism.
 
      jmull - 2 minutes ago
      You make a poor point.First, your definition of whataboutism
      doesn't jibe with ones in common use, such as
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whataboutism.Second, your "NOT"
      example only works if A and B are equivalent, which,
      obviously they are not for several reasons. (the tactics and
      secrecy are different as are the elections.Actually, you make
      a very poor point, when I consider the the insult you hurled
      at someone for daring to bring up whataboutism -- a term
      apparently invented to describe the tactic of deflecting
      criticism of Russian actions, which is exactly this
      situation.Poor show.
 
  raquo - 55 minutes ago
  Well, both Putin and the US have good-to-them reasons to
  interfere in each others elections. And to interfere in Russian
  elections.On a serious note, the reason you don't hear about it
  is because US interference in Russia, whatever that was, didn't
  come even close to turning Russian elections.
 
    havetocharge - 51 minutes ago
    So, if I was to draw a parallel, murder is only bad if it is
    successful?
 
      dragonwriter - 16 minutes ago
      > murder is only bad if it is successful?If it?s nobody gets
      killed, it?s not murder. I think the principle that attempted
      murder, unsuccessful conspiracy to commit murder, or
      soliciting a murder which does not actually occur are lesser
      offenses than murder is fairly well established.
 
      raquo - 42 minutes ago
      First, that's not much of a parallel. The morality of generic
      murder is clearcut, the morality of interference with other
      countries elections is not. Not everyone subscribes to prime
      directive. As a Russian I personally appreciate that someone
      is at least trying to instill some positive change in
      Russia.Morals aside, you said> It's curious this is virtually
      never mentioned amidst all the accusations of Russia
      involving itself in US elections.I told you why. Because
      whatever the US did was not effective, and it's not as
      newsworthy as things that are happening in the US and
      affecting Americans.
 
      toephu2 - 41 minutes ago
      That is somewhat true, I believe attempted murder sentences
      are lighter than actual murder sentences.
 
  jonny_eh - 50 minutes ago
  So? This isn't about morally shaming Russia.
 
  fabrika - 48 minutes ago
  In fact we don't have any elections. Opposition leaders are
  banned or get killed (Navalny, Nemtsov). The opposition is only
  allowed to have marginal media (Echo of Moscow, TV Rain). An
  opposing media that becomes popular gets seized by loyal
  oligarchs supported by corrupt courts (NTV, Lenta.ru, RBC).
 
    owebmaster - 24 minutes ago
    And no color revolution took place in Russia.
 
  Retra - 2 minutes ago
  Hypocrisy is still not a fallacy.
 
  guelo - 43 minutes ago
  Somebody else that manipulates and corrupts Russian elections:
  Putin.
 
  gfosco - 40 minutes ago
  I bet we spend a lot more on it than the maximum $150k discussed
  in the article.  Talk about a nothing-burger.
 
  roywiggins - 34 minutes ago
  Russia doesn't have free or fair elections anyway- how could the
  US possibly corrupt it any more than Putin cronies personally
  controlling almost all domestic Russian media?
 
    joveian - 13 minutes ago
    The US had a major role in creating the environment that lead
    to Putin gaining power, with a much heavier hand than anything
    Russia is accused of at this point.  Matt Taibbi had a good
    article on this a little while
    ago:https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/taibbi-
    what-d...
 
  akhilcacharya - 22 minutes ago
  That's the benefit of being a sole superpower. There are double
  standards here for a reason.
 
Zhenya - 1 hours ago
Can we see what the ads were? Can we see how they were targeted?Am
I missing this somewhere?
 
[deleted]
 
  chasing - 1 hours ago
  Nope. You're probably thinking of the $25m the Saudis gave to the
  Clinton Foundation, a non-profit humanitarian organization.
 
    malchow - 1 hours ago
    ...that spent significantly more money on luxury travel costs
    than it did on charitable grants. [1][1]
    http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocuments/2014/311/580/2014-3115...
 
      rhcom2 - 1 hours ago
      93.91/100 from Charity Navigator, spending 86.9% on programs
      and services.
 
      aaronbrethorst - 1 hours ago
          Charitable grants are not a major focus     of the
      Clinton Foundation, which instead     uses most of its money
      to carry out its     own humanitarian programs.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinton_Foundation"Luxury"
      sounds like editorializing given the data you provide to back
      up your claim, which simply lists travel as being a $7.8mm
      cost and grants as a $4.1mm cost (page 10 of your linked
      PDF).
 
        malchow - 25 minutes ago
        "On its 2013 tax forms, the most recent available, the
        foundation claimed it spent $30 million on payroll and
        employee benefits; $8.7 million in rent and office
        expenses; $9.2 million on ?conferences, conventions and
        meetings?; $8 million on fundraising; and nearly $8.5
        million on travel. None of the Clintons is on the payroll,
        but they do enjoy first-class flights paid for by the
        foundation.In all, the group reported $84.6 million in
        ?functional expenses? on its 2013 tax return and had more
        than $64 million left over..." [1][1]
        https://nypost.com/2015/04/26/charity-watchdog-clinton-
        found...So of $140M raised tax-free in 2013, half was spent
        keeping the operation going that very year.
 
      dragonwriter - 25 minutes ago
      Aside from the editorializing about "luxury", that's because
      it is a direct-action charity, not an pass-through charity
      that gives grants to other charities while skimming off the
      top for administrative expenses. So, yes, it spends more on
      travel (and lots of other things) than on charitable grants,
      because grants aren't the mechanism by which it's charitable
      purpose is realized.
 
    esaym - 1 hours ago
    How is that not the same thing?
 
      chasing - 1 hours ago
      Well, it's confusing because both include the word "Clinton,"
      but one is a human being who, amongst other things, ran for
      President in 2016. The other is a non-profit humanitarian
      organization. Two different things.
 
        xtian - 1 hours ago
        Good grief.https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8825813
 
        pamqzl - 1 hours ago
        > non-profit humanitarian organizationWhich just happens to
        pay the Clintons' bills every time they feel like
        travelling anywhere, and direct money to whoever the
        Clintons want to do favours for.The election is over, we
        can all admit that the Clinton Foundation is pretty stinky.
 
          GabrielF00 - 1 hours ago
          They've also helped millions of people get affordable
          AIDS medication.http://www.politifact.com/global-
          news/statements/2016/jun/15...
 
          takeda - 57 minutes ago
          Don't want to get into Trump vs Hilary debate, but don't
          you think it is a bit strange that nearly every rich
          individual has their own foundation? A foundation that
          most people don't know what is responsible for. Most of
          the time you don't hear it doing much either.Why for
          example some political entities donate large amount of
          money to these foundations instead of the ones that are
          proven to do something (like red cross).It feels like
          perhaps those foundations are there just to exploit a tax
          loophole, and that they donate once in a while to
          specific cause to satisfy their legal requirements.
 
          [deleted]
 
          AaronFriel - 1 hours ago
          That's probably true, but there's very little evidence of
          donations to the foundation being used to elicit favors,
          and there's a smidge of evidence that such attempts
          failed. Example:http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-
          pol-clinton-donor-chag...
 
        dforrestwilson - 1 hours ago
        Pretty snarky when we all know the lines are blurrier than
        your comment suggests.Here's one example where the Clinton
        Foundation provided access to government officials by
        corporations seeking favors:  http://freebeacon.com/issues
        /emails-clinton-foundation-donor...Denis O?Brien has a
        checkered past of journalistic obstruction:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denis_O%27BrienAccess. The
        Clinton Foundation sells access, from which the Clinton
        family benefits.I don't see the Gates Foundation pulling
        this, do you?
 
    scottmf - 1 hours ago
    It's a non-issue and you're really wasting your time responding
    to these attempts to suggest "both candidates were as corrupt
    as each other" in the 2016 election:"Nonetheless. looking at
    the Clinton Foundation?s donor list, Saudi Arabia gave between
    $10 million and $25 million. But the foundation reported the
    Saudi money in December 2008, and the amount hasn?t changed
    since. Clinton Foundation spokesman Brian Cookstra pointed out
    that Saudi Arabia did not give to the foundation while
    Secretary Clinton was at the State Department."Why people
    genuinely believe we should focus on this, rather than Donald
    Trump's ongoing business ties to Russia?and all of the blatant
    lies about it?I'll never know.
 
    teddy_r_bear - 1 hours ago
    A fund run by their daughter...http://time.com/3736221/chelsea-
    clinton-global-initiative-hi......that has been accused of
    sometimes using the foundation as a type of slush
    fund...http://nypost.com/2016/11/06/chelsea-clinton-used-
    foundation......and doesn't always do what it
    promises...https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/15/us/politics
    /hillary-clint...
 
shostack - 1 hours ago
This is likely just the tip of the digital advertising iceberg with
all of this for FB and other advertising giants like Google and
Twitter. According to this Wired article[1] Giles-Parscale, the
agency behind a lot of the Trump election digital efforts "took in
some $90 million, the vast majority of which went toward buying
Facebook ads for the campaign."A Reddit user who "was working at
the other end of this pipeline that is selling digital adspace to
consulting firms" (according to his post) also posted some very
detailed insights as to how funds might have been laundered into
clean political donations via small agencies and PACs in the US via
digital media buys.Here's his follow-up post from three months ago
which has more info and links to his original post--really worth
reading all of it, his original post, the subsequent threads, etc.:
https://np.reddit.com/r/politics/comments/6alzm0/fbi_confirm...So
the issue is less about ads purchased directly from Russia or by
illegitimate companies with Russian IPs or anything of the sort as
FB addressed in this statement. That is a drop in the bucket
compared to the dollar amounts that might have been spent as part
of the rest of the Trump media buys. The bigger story may actually
be more about Russian (and other funds) funneled through small
legit digital agencies and PACs (or through Parscale) in the US who
then did ad buys driving for Trump donations which he was then able
to legally use as campaign funds (or for enriching himself as the
Reddit user hypothesizes).There are likely FB sales reps and others
there who have some insight into the ad campaign objectives,
targeting details, and the source of that targeting data. The last
bit is interesting there because it is still not fully understood
how Cambridge Analytica plugged into all of this, and how they
obtained their detailed targeting data. Mercer and Bannon both have
direct Cambridge Analytica ties[2].All of this is to say that I
don't think the full story is being unearthed with these data
points that FB shared. And I'd be willing to bet that FB sales reps
who dealt with these accounts during the election know quite a bit
more about what actually went on. However we may never know how
deep the rabbit hole really goes, how dirty such funds might
actually be, or how much FB, Google and Twitter really profited
from the election (and ongoing campaigns).I want to conclude this
by stating that I am just posting my own personal thoughts based on
a variety of articles and Reddit posts, and I don't purport to have
any inside insight into these companies operations beyond my fairly
deep experience in the online advertising space and my
understanding of how that operates, so this is largely speculation
and you should come to your own conclusions. That said, it is
hardly outside the realm of possibility at this point to imagine
how this sort of scheme could work, and how all of the players
involved might have had strong financial incentives to not rock the
boat.[1] https://www.wired.com/story/trump-russia-data-parscale-
faceb...[2] http://www.newsweek.com/did-russians-target-dem-voters-
kushn...