GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-06) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Voynich manuscript: the solution
118 points by noahth
https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/voynich-manuscript-sol...
cript-solution/
___________________________________________________________________
 
fusiongyro - 2 hours ago
Where's the actual solution? I feel like I'm missing something
because what I see is some plausible commentary about it and some
interesting discussion of Latin and ligatures but where's the
actual decoding of the writing?
 
  tbrake - 2 hours ago
  The last two paragraphs direct how to decode but no fully decoded
  text is available.An exercise left to the reader I suppose.
 
    atemerev - 2 hours ago
    There is a sample decoding at the top of the article. Looks
    plausible.
 
    saalweachter - 2 hours ago
    The image at the top is a decoding of a couple of lines of
    text.The decoding yields extremely boring Latin, so I'm not
    terribly surprised if the investigator decided not to decode
    the entire document.
 
      quinndupont - 47 minutes ago
      That's the curious thing: to an academic there's no such
      thing as "extremely boring Latin", especially when it comes
      to the Voynich. Why we're only given a tantalizing line is
      odd. Perhaps there is no single "universal" solution? Perhaps
      this is just a guess that happens to roughly work for a
      single line, but nothing else?
 
        fusiongyro - 22 minutes ago
        I agree. To claim a solution without writing out the whole
        thing so it can be analyzed in depth seems absurd to me.
        I'm also not convinced that the statistical analyses that
        have been thrown at it would fail to detect patterns of
        meaning that are obscured merely by abbreviation.
 
  CommieBobDole - 2 hours ago
  As I read it, the writing is un-decodable because it's not really
  "writing" in the conventional sense, it's recipes encoded using
  single-letter abbreviations, many of which require an index to
  decipher. No index is present, and the author surmises that it
  was never completed, or lost.
 
    hcs - 2 hours ago
    I'm reminded of the work that was done to reverse engineer the
    Intel ME 11 [1], it was compressed with an unknown Huffman code
    which the team was nevertheless able to recover somehow. And
    that was with variable-length words![1]
    http://blog.ptsecurity.com/2017/08/disabling-intel-me.html
 
      unkown-unknowns - 1 hours ago
      From your link:> In particular, MINIX was chosen as the basis
      for the operating system (previously, ThreadX RTOS had been
      used). Now ME firmware includes a full-fledged operating
      system [...]Woah, did I read that correctly? That there is a
      version of MINIX running inside of the Intel processors of
      presumably almost every modern computer with an Intel CPU
      that has Intel ME in it? If so then that's insanely cool! I
      mean I still dislike Intel ME itself and wish I could disable
      it easily and without risking damage/destruction but the idea
      of there being a version of MINIX running on my computer
      right now is quite cool.
 
        lisper - 51 minutes ago
        > Woah, did I read that correctly?Yep.> If so then that's
        insanely cool!I find it rather disturbing myself.
 
        exikyut - 49 minutes ago
        Yup. I'm amazed too.On the one hand I wish the signing keys
        are found/"figured out" one day; that means I can look at
        the OS myself, which would be cool.But on the other hand,
        that gives rise to "3 CPUs for your rootkits!" (there are 3
        486 cores) intrusions that would be unsettlingly
        hideable.I'm torn about which way to go. Personally I
        actually wish the signing keys (or a circumvention) was in
        wide circulation - it means I have to be hyper-aware about
        my system state and what's running on it, but the chances
        are, if I can modify the code running on the 486 cores, I
        can run my own code on them that interacts with the rest of
        my system in detectable ways I can define myself (eg,
        writing a tiny string to a known part of memory immediately
        causes it to be changed (eg, hashed) to something else
        according to an algorithm) so I know the 486 cores are busy
        running my code (and hopefully only my code). Shard,
        fragment, encrypt, obfuscate, etc that logic a few degrees,
        and you should have a good canary.And then I get to say
        _I'm_ using (in the sense that I own) all 11 cores, 19
        cores, 27 cores, etc in my Intel CPU.FWIW, it does seem
        that the keys are floating around out there:
        https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14189982 (i336_ was my
        previous account before I accidentally locked it)
 
    joe_the_user - 1 hours ago
    Or the situation might be that if a person comes to believe
    that the book is simply a compendium of coded medieval recipes
    then one wouldn't invest the huge amount of time need to
    reconstruct the index and so decoding it, since at the end one
    wouldn't wind-up with the prestige and excitement associated
    with decoding an ancient language.
 
  [deleted]
 
  singularity2001 - 2 hours ago
  A latin tramslation snipped is in the header: https://www.the-
  tls.co.uk/s3/tls-prod/uploads/2017/09/p16_Gi... (not too
  convincing IMO)
 
mntmn - 16 minutes ago
What if it is just Lorem Ipsum by someone who could draw but not
actually write?
 
jv22222 - 56 minutes ago
There is a good general synopsis of the Voynich manuscript on wikip
edia:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voynich_manuscriptInteresting
stuff!
 
eponeponepon - 2 hours ago
Fascinating, if accurate - and I rather hope it is. If it is, it
would make the whole thing a rather instructive example of how
siloing knowledge can hide truth; the author's domain knowledge has
given him the tools to identify the manuscript, but it's generally
been in the domain of conspiracists and 'hidden knowledge of the
ancients' types.It would be good to see a thorough study of it to
test the author's hypothesis, of course.
 
Havoc - 2 hours ago
Rather convenient "solution".The solution is the heading and
index...which are missing.Author might be right, but that is
essentially an un-provable statement and doesn't really amount to a
solution. But rather a statement that it can't be solved.
 
  bsder - 1 hours ago
  > Author might be right, but that is essentially an un-provable
  statement and doesn't really amount to a solution. But rather a
  statement that it can't be solved.Not at all.  Someone more
  motivated than the author can choose to decode it.  If much of it
  was lifted, then you can trace back the lifted "recipe" to the
  earlier work and construct the index.However, it's going to be
  very painful, slow work.  For no real gain (who really cares
  about a sloppily done Medieval health self-help book?).
 
    [deleted]
 
  jacobush - 1 hours ago
  Also a statement that the solution, even if found, would be
  boring as hell.
 
  dnautics - 1 hours ago
  Is it consistent with the layout of other similar books of the
  period?
 
MikeGale - 1 hours ago
A fascinating analysis, half done.  If the whole text were decoded
and the indices rebuilt, would be more convincing.
 
Nursie - 5 minutes ago
I see a theory, not a translation, am I alone in this?
 
nkurz - 1 hours ago
Other than declaring that the solution is obvious to a self-
declared expert such as himself, the author (Nicholas Gibbs)
doesn't appear to give any proof of his theory.So far I can can
find online, this piece is the only thing he has ever published
about the Voynich manuscript:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=%22nicholas+gibbs%22+voynichWho is
Nicholas Gibbs?  Does anyone besides Nicholas Gibbs trust his
opinion on these matters?  And how did he convince the TLS to
publish this drivel?(to avoid being entirely negative, here's a
link to a blog that shows what some better Voynich research looks
like: https://stephenbax.net)
 
  [deleted]
 
  quinndupont - 49 minutes ago
  Agreed. It's a super strange article (sure, written like an
  academic, but even most don't bury the lede that badly!)From the
  article it isn't clear if all or just a portion of the text is
  decipherable using the implied logic (ligatures of abbreviations
  of medicinal items).
 
  CommieBobDole - 48 minutes ago
  You know, it does seem odd that there's no background on the
  author and his qualifications attached to the article, and I
  can't seem to find any sign of him elsewhere.
 
  emmelaich - 22 minutes ago
  I found a Nicholas Gibbs article on a medieval figure here:
  http://theibizan.com/ramon-llull-philosopher-logician/Same guy?
  Editor of a paper in Ibiza.ps. http://www.voynich.nu/ has a lot
  of interesting discussion; it's much linked to from wikipedia.
 
mordae - 1 hours ago
As Czech myself, I prefer to believe the theory of several clever
guys tricking someone important to buy a nonsense book of secrets,
splitting the spoils, having a good laugh. Resonates well...
Heidrich called us the Laughing beasts for a reason.
 
computator - 36 minutes ago
A sample translation is the key thing I wanted to read in this
article, and all they gave was an illegible low-resolution snippet
without an English translation -- very annoying.As best as I can
read, the purported Latin translation in the image at the top of
the article says:Folia de oz et en de aqua et de radicts de
aromaticus ana 3 de seminis ana 2 et de radicis semenis ana 1 etium
abonenticus confundo. Folia et cum folia et confundo etiam de eius
decocole adigo aromaticus decocque de decoctio adigo aromaticus et
confundo et de radicis seminis ana 3.Feeding the above to Google
Translate gives:The leaves of Oz and added to the water and the
aromatic radicts semen Ana ana 3 2 seed and the roots ana 1 etium
abonenticus the mix. The leaves, when the leaves are decocole adigo
and the mix of the aromatic decocque of the cooking adigo an
aromatic mix of roots and seeds Ana 3.Yes, I realize that the
author's translation might be completely mistaken, but I'm curious
to read what he thinks it says. If someone can make out the words
better, please do so.
 
[deleted]
 
dmbaggett - 1 hours ago
There are many crank analyses of the Voynich manuscript floating
around out there. The only thing I've seen that has any
believability (I'm a former linguist) is this:youtube.com/watch?v=4
cRlqE3D3RQyoutube.com/watch?v=8nHbImkFKE4tl;dr: it's probably real
writing, likely related to Roma/Syriac
 
  gecko - 39 minutes ago
  I rarely comment here anymore, but I wanted to break that
  tradition to say thank-you. I have been routinely frustrated?or
  more honestly, just annoyed?at Voynich attempts for exactly the
  reasons you highlight. I have no idea if this is correct, but
  it's the only serious modern attempt I've seen, and I genuinely
  really appreciated this.
 
emeraldd - 1 hours ago
So the whole thing is written in a form of shorthand and the core
index/naming that define what the individual pieces are is missing.
I wonder if this wasn't meant as a "production" manuscript but as a
reference document for the replication of a larger work?
 
lisper - 22 minutes ago
The idea that the Voynich manuscript is a medical text seems
plausible, but the theory that it uses a logographic representation
(one symbol per word) rather than an alphabetic or even a
syllabaric (one symbol per syllable) one seems less likely to me.
A cursory examination of the manuscript
(http://www.voynich.nu/folios.html) reveals that the lexicography
looks much more like an alphabetic encoding than a logographic one
like Chinese.  The symbols are collected into word-like groups
separated by white space.  Also, it appears that there are too many
repeated symbols and insufficiently many distinct symbols for a
logographic language.
 
dwringer - 1 hours ago
I see comments suggesting that it wouldn't be worth the effort to
translate this based on the author's hypotheses, but there has been
a substantial community around trying to do just that for a long
time.  FWIW The NSA appears to have published a book around 1978,
The Voynich Manuscript: An Elegant Enigma [1], and a couple of the
things from this article jump out at me after having read that book
that raise red flags about the article's interpretation.  The idea
that there were multiple artists is far from being universally
accepted, and experts who have studied this in the past have not
been able to conclusively state that there were more than one or
two authors or artists, although the possibility does remain open.
Secondly, the suggestion that each glyph represents a full word in
latin has also been studied - see the link for more information,
but the frequency distributions and vocabulary size do not seem to
make sense if that is the case (someone please correct me if I'm
wrong).In all I am surprised more progress has not been made since
the advent of the internet and its crowd-sourcing potential.  There
is definitely no shortage of interpretations all over the internet,
and in headlines from time to time.  The last one I recall from a
couple of months ago suggested that there was a specific Jewish
birthing practice being illustrated on one of the pages that
suggested a certain origin of the text.
[2][1]https://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic-heritage/historical-
fi...[2]https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jul/05/author-of-
myst...