GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-06) - page 2 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
"Why Chess Will Destroy Your Mind": Outlook of the Game in 1859
27 points by shubhamjain
https://medium.com/message/why-chess-will-destroy-your-mind-78ad...
___________________________________________________________________
 
OneTimePoster - 18 minutes ago
What happens when mass-media-enforced morality is obviously
engaging in an endless parade of ridiculous moral panics based on
flimsy redefinitions of words like "harassment" and aggressively
doxxes, downvotes, bans, and supresses anyone trying to call it a
moral panic?EDIT: Exhibit A.
 
B1FF_PSUVM - 57 minutes ago
Eh, at least for me chess didn't play in dreams, the way Tetris did
back in the day it was new.
 
sfRattan - 55 minutes ago
Chess in the 19th century is my go to example when trying to
deprogram someone from anxious preoccupation with whatever moral
panic is currently fashionable. I use the word 'deprogram' in the
sense of helping someone recover from a cult deliberately.You can
often find an article from some newspaper of the period decrying
chess and its pernicious effects on the youth, the mind, morals, et
cetera. Change the instances of 'chess' to 'video games,'
'violent/sexy movies,' 'dungeons & dragons,' 'smartphones,' or
whatever item is the focus of a moral panic. Maybe change a few of
the sentences in the article where context demands it.Have your
pearl clutching friend read the modified article. Then show them
the original.Fear mongering rhetorical devices become impossible
not to notice.
 
  javajosh - 16 minutes ago
  While rhetoric is real, sometimes the threat is real too.
  Consider the story of "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" - at the end, he
  really was telling the truth (although we can be forgiven for
  ignoring him).
 
  siglesias - 34 minutes ago
  I don't find this line of argument compelling. It's a form of
  moral induction that specifically selects things that are still
  in play today (like chess) while ignoring valid warnings that
  altered a trend (vehicle safety) or halted a trend (smoking).
  Every moral or health threat needs to be evaluated on its own
  merits regardless of whether it has the syntax of a historical
  warning that ended up in hindsight seeming kind of absurd. This
  is exactly the kind of argument corporations exploring potent
  forms of addiction want trotted out.
 
    abritinthebay - 22 minutes ago
    There?s a difference in bring alarmist but making good points
    and bring alarmist and using rhetorical tricks.You are
    describing the former, they the latter.A problem should stand
    on its own without the emotional manipulation.
 
redux13 - 1 hours ago
I wonder if any parallels can be drawn between this and the
inordinate amount of time children today spend starting at
smartphones. While my personal opinion is that it is probably
harmful to have so much of our attention focussed on phones at such
a young age, we don't know how future societies will view this
activity in retrospect.
 
  jimmaswell - 59 minutes ago
  My prediction is that everyone will be fine just like every other
  time a new thing came around, and phones won't finally be the one
  "it's different for real this time super seriously" thing.
 
    swayvil - 56 minutes ago
    Or, if everybody is affected the same way then nobody will know
    the difference.
 
    cgag - 9 minutes ago
    My prediction is they will continue the decline that's been
    going on for a long time.I'm not convinced they were wrong
    about chess either.
 
    jonahx - 7 minutes ago
    You may be right, but it's clear that the _level_ of the
    addiction, and its ubiquity, are more powerful than anything
    before.  It's basically everyone is doing a minimum of a couple
    hours a day (but spread out, so without any prolonged
    cessation), with the average now like 4-5 hours I believe.
    Television is probably the closest competitor, but that was
    typically confined to blocks of after-work hours.
 
    pesfandiar - 1 minutes ago
    Just like how cigarettes were completely fine for a few
    generations, or added sugar took over fat in every food
    product? I mean, if everyone does something bad, does it make
    it fine or only invisible?
 
  swayvil - 57 minutes ago
  For that matter, what do you suppose is the effect of hours and
  days spent focusing on intellectual abstractions in school and
  work.In my experience it is extremely consciousness-altering. And
  the effect sticks. It can become "reality" for a person.In  the
  meditation scene we have a technique for altering your
  consciousness through prolonged concentration. The Buddhists call
  it "Samatha". It is potent.
 
  Infinitesimus - 35 minutes ago
  Another thing that might (no strong studies AFAIK so this this
  straight out of my behind) be a consequence of our increased
  phone use is myopia.There is some evidence that myopia
  incidents(diagnoses?) have increased but I don't think there is
  proof that it is caused by our increased time spent looking at
  things close to us.I also think it is harmful to have so much
  exposure especially because the most popular apps on smartphones
  are designed to grab our attention constantly and create this
  dependency on getting a notification.Hopefully we see some great
  studies in the next 10-30 years that can properly map the effects
  the so-called "attention economy" has had on us