GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-05) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Demon-Haunted World
201 points by drabiega
http://www.locusmag.com/Perspectives/2017/09/cory-doctorow-demon...
___________________________________________________________________
 
zackmorris - 1 minutes ago
Startup idea:Form a company that explores new markets in legal
liabilities.  It could bring lawsuits with little risk where the
payoff could be billions of dollars.  Off the top of my head:*
Research whether channels were engineered into smartphones to allow
water to leak in (since they have no moving parts and should self-
evidently be watertight).* Find the planned-obsolescence parts in
things like car doors that were engineered too thin or out of
plastic so that door and window handles fail after a certain number
of uses.* Find evidence that companies opted to use proprietary
battery and charger form factors which drove up prices and
prevented interoperability....the list is nearly endless.  Most of
these seem like they depend on research or whistleblowers.  If the
free market and regulations won't prevent this kind of widespread
hacking then maybe lucrative opportunities could be found working
within the courts!
 
[deleted]
 
adrianratnapala - 1 hours ago
Hmm, I suspect the article is not really news to the people who
frequent sites like this, and perhaps not even to the readership of
a science-fiction mag like locus.But I would like a nice readable
article like that to appear in more mainstream publications.  It
should make a good story, being both true and sensationalist and
important at the same time.
 
MrZongle2 - 33 minutes ago
FTA: "Dieselgate killed people"What's the source for this claim?
 
  iak8god - 22 minutes ago
  Every year a shocking number of people die from illness caused by
  air pollution [1]. While it might be difficult or impossible to
  put a head count on "Dieselgate," the increased emissions
  certainly killed some.[1] http://news.mit.edu/2013/study-air-
  pollution-causes-200000-e...
 
    cr0sh - 4 minutes ago
    If you go down that route, you farting contributed methane to
    the atmosphere, increasing global warming and thus contributed
    to killing someone somewhere.So are we going to start banning
    the passing of gas at the dinner table?
 
SubiculumCode - 1 hours ago
This is what I think about at the pump.More and more I see gas
pumps ask if you want a receipt BEFORE the gas is dispensed. This
seems risky.If you decline the receipt and then dispense gas, the
pump could cheat on the amount of gas dispensed with less risk, as
a papered record of the purchase amount and price is not
produced.If on the other hand, the pump waits to ask if you desire
a receipt until after the gasoline is dispensed, the dispenser will
not know if a written record will be requested, and cheating the
customer is riskier.Therefore, I always request a receipt if asked
prior to dispensing my gasoline.
 
  [deleted]
 
  to3m - 49 minutes ago
  But according to this theory, it sounds as if one should ask for
  the receipt afterwards?
 
    SubiculumCode - 45 minutes ago
    By one do you mean the consumer? Gas pump software seems to
    come with two variants: 1) Ask before pumping gas. 2) Ask after
    pumping gas.
 
  harrisi - 32 minutes ago
  Certainly having the receipt doesn't actually do anything? Do you
  measure the volume of gas in your tank before and after filling
  up?Regardless, this seems very easy to test. Just fill up a gas
  can and check that you're paying the right amount for the amount
  of gas in the can.
 
    SubiculumCode - 16 minutes ago
    Without a receipt there are two things that can be a problem:
    1) Less gas is pumped, 2) Charged more than the pump said.True
    the receipt protects against 2) more than 1) because the car's
    tank does not have an accurate guage.I remember listening to a
    story once about a fraud at the gas tank in which the normal
    amount of gas was only given out when requested in an even
    increment a five gallons which was how much The Regulators
    requested when they came and tested a gas stations pumps. they
    were caught after a spicious regulator requested an odd amount
    of gasoline and got the wrong amount.with a combination of
    receipts and camera/ML classification that classifies when a
    customer is filling a tank versus filling their car will allow
    avoidance of weights and measures regulators. This is a problem
    I foresee.
 
  SubiculumCode - 58 minutes ago
  Pair that with cameras to classify whether it is being pumped
  into a car or into a portable tank.....eesh
 
ehsankia - 1 hours ago
I'm curious about the WannaCry situation. If the killswitch was
truly to detect being in a VM, could they still not have bought the
domain and just left unresponsive, or even better, just generate a
random new domain every single time.I guess they just didn't
foresee someone buying the domain.
 
  ineptech - 1 hours ago
  > or even better, just generate a random new domain every single
  time.I'm no expert, but I do recall reading in one of the WC
  write-ups that there is known malware that does this.
 
    clwg - 49 minutes ago
    It's called a DGA or domain generation algorithm, I believe
    Conficker was one of the first botnet's to use this approach
    about 10 years ago, it's pretty standard trade craft nowadays.h
    ttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_generation_algorithm
 
  Kostic - 1 hours ago
  Buying a domain would make deanonymizing them easier and would
  take energy from the main effort.
 
  cortesoft - 17 minutes ago
  And how effective is that defense, anyway? I mean, couldn't you
  just clone the VM, and start responding or not responding to
  different domains until you hit on the right one? Or hell, have
  your VM check a domain and respond correctly if the domain isn't
  registered?
 
  luckyt - 14 minutes ago
  Yea, this part was confusing to me as well. How would a VM
  "simulate" the internet? Does it return a dummy page? I don't
  understand what mental model of VM behavior that the virus
  creators had in mind when they designed this killswitch.
 
walterbell - 1 hours ago
See efforts to pass Right-to-Repair laws in several U.S. states:
https://repair.org & https://ifixit.org/rightFrom
http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/infrastructure/a2..."...
farmers have worked on their own equipment "for decades,
generations even." Brasch also pointed to the emerging DIY sources
of information in the world as a way that farmers and others who
want to make repairs can learn about their equipment: "You can go
to a YouTube for something as simple as baking a cake to repairing
or operating an item. I think that's the way the market is moving.
We'd like this market to move with the rest of the world."This is
one of the IP/copyright issues being negotiated in the new version
of NAFTA (US, Canada, Mexico), as many farmers are affected.
 
captaincrowbar - 1 hours ago
Doctorow mentions the cases where a printer company has made their
software lie about how much ink was left in a cartridge to make
consumers replace them more often. I always wondered why a
manufacturer would want to do that. I mean, I understand the motive
of making consumers buy ink more often, but from the manufacturer's
point of view, why would they want to throw perfectly good ink
away? Colour ink isn't as expensive to manufacture as they like to
claim but it's still worth something. Why didn't they just put less
ink in the cartridge to begin with (and maybe lie about how much
was in it), instead of lying about how much was left toward the end
of its life and throwing ink away?
 
  nikanj - 1 hours ago
  Having the device lie based on the age of the cartridge makes for
  a more predictable sales volume in the future. See also, inkjets
  that "clean" the heads by running ink through them on every power
  cycle.
 
  kbsletten - 1 hours ago
  It's probably to avoid/mitigate lawsuits. It's possible that this
  would still be covered under false advertising but there's
  something to be said about the feasibility of testing a lot of
  unopened packages to show the ink level is low vs having to run
  all those packages down within the parameters of the device (so
  the testers aren't seen as the cheaters, over-using the
  cartridges to make the problem seem worse than it would be for
  "regular folk"). They'd be dead-to-rights under-filling but they
  have a better shot (and a better potential settlement) with the
  under-reporting.
 
    kbenson - 55 minutes ago
    There's a lot a wiggle room in saying that your ink is almost
    out.  The simple defense is that they don't want people to have
    wasted prints, which might happen if the ink for one color
    actually runs out, so they notify a little earlier.  That
    "little earlier" is vague and relative, giving a lot of
    defensible ground for a lawyer to work with if it comes to
    that.  Stating you are selling a certain amount of something
    and not actually delivering that amount is illegal, and fairly
    cut and dry at that.  It's not hard to see why one is more
    likely to be attempted than the other for a company.
 
  maxxxxx - 57 minutes ago
  Lying about the amount of ink is pretty easy to proof. So they
  would be in trouble quickly. Misoreper4sting the ink level is
  much more diffuse. The strategy is to lie in a way that won't get
  you in court.
 
zaroth - 1 hours ago
Why do our phones, which certainly felt damn snappy the day we
bought them, inevitablely seem to slow down to the point of
unusability after a couple dozen months? Even after a factory reset
and installing no apps at all... I know it didn't take that long to
open/close the built in apps when I bought that iPhone 4, 5,
5s...The only thing I can think of is the flash drive is slowing
down as it wears. Or, the CPU clock rate is programmed to
progressively lower itself the longer it runs.Has anyone done the
performance analysis on used phones to prove this isn't just my
brain moving the goalposts as hardware improves, or apps just
slowing down as they bloat, but that the old devices really and
truly are running the same software significantly slower than when
they were new?
 
  leggomylibro - 36 minutes ago
  I don't get this; everyone says it, but I've never seen it in
  smartphones. Laptops, sure, but Windows really DOES accumulate a
  lot of cruft, and OSX's updates never seem to improve
  performance.Smartphones, though? The only slowdown I've noticed
  is when the battery starts to go. And then you can usually tell;
  the device gets hot as the battery pushes up against all the ESR
  it's accumulated, the CPU steps back a bit...that's what I
  figure, anyways. For me, it's always coincided with the same
  inflection point when I start really noticing things like charge
  cycles taking much longer and a sharp drop-off in the life of a
  100% charge.
 
    bmurphy1976 - 19 minutes ago
    I've experienced slow-downs with both iOS and Android devices.
    They almost always corresponded with newer versions of
    operating system and all the extra functionality that came with
    the upgrade.The apps are also evolving.  Compare Facebook today
    to what it was two or three years ago.  The app does a ton more
    and all that extra functionality doesn't come for free. I
    suspect one of the primary reasons they broke messenger out
    into a separate app is that the Facebook app was simply too
    damn big.There have been instances where an upgrade has made my
    experience better, but the trend has definitely been in the
    other direction (for me anyway).I also have another concrete
    example: the original Nexus 7 had an SSD that didn't support
    trim.  Over time it became nearly unusable as the SSD became
    fragmented.  It was also severely bandwidth constrained.  The
    device was decent until the first major Android revision came
    out.  At that point, the new version of Android so
    significantly increased the bandwidth requirements on the SSD
    that it effectively strangled the device.What was an awesome
    device the day I got it became absolutely unusable.  Eventually
    I installed a version of CyanogenMod and formatted it with an
    SSD friendly file system which made it passable again but,
    still sucked compared to the day I bought it.
 
  cpeterso - 29 minutes ago
  My iPhone 6 used to be snappy, but now takes almost 10 seconds to
  just open an app. Perhaps new OS updates are not as well-
  optimized for older iPhones as they are for the latest
  version.Ars Technica's Android 8.0 deep-dive has some interesting
  charts showing Android device performance deteriorating over
  time:https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/09/android-8-0-oreo-
  tho...
 
  52-6F-62 - 25 minutes ago
  I've experienced and noticed a different problem. I've had the
  same phone for almost 5 years (have a hard time replacing
  something that still works well and is in good condition), and
  I've found it's not the speed that has worsened and I can live
  with not having certain features to run some new apps; it's the
  storage.My phone's storage is not large by today's standards, I
  have 16 GB. I run fewer apps than I did when I got the phone, and
  have run the same general collection from day one. I have less
  music on my phone than I had in the past. I have only had to
  continually remove applications and music as just about every
  week it has warned me that my storage is almost full. This only
  started within the last year. I won't have added anything new,
  keep my cache flushed, etc and I still have to continually remove
  items.Is there something practical I'm missing here, or... ?
 
  lostmsu - 1 hours ago
  How about this simple hypothesis: Android is suffering from the
  same problems all Windows had prior to Windows 7 - drive
  fragmentation. Cheap flash will not give you nice access times
  when data is fragmented, and over time fragmentation accumulates.
 
    andai - 41 minutes ago
    I thought fragmentation was a non-issue on solid state storage?
 
    badloginagain - 1 hours ago
    I have fond memories of several hour defrag sessions on old
    Windows machines.
 
  bryanbuckley - 1 hours ago
  Could be the drive slowing.. but definitely a big chunk of loss
  of performance comes from OS updates (i.e. that were not tested
  on the now old device for performance and battery discharge rate
  as aggressively as initial release)
 
  nikanj - 1 hours ago
  Say no to every iOS upgrade and your device remains quite fast.
  Apps do slow down over time, unless you disable updates for them
  as well.
 
  mikeash - 55 minutes ago
  Next time I get a new phone, I'm going to put together a
  performance testing plan and record a video of it on the new
  phone. Then any time I wonder about this, I can run through the
  plan again and compare with the recording. So, ask me again in a
  few years.
 
    kbenson - 50 minutes ago
    Please publish/open source the testing criteria, so others can
    do the test and submit their own results.  That would be
    awesome.  I would probably run around the house and test all
    the phones in my family.Even something as simple as Github and
    using pull requests for those that know how to do so (or
    manually just adding for those that email and don't) would give
    a lot of introspection, and allow you to share commit bits so
    people could help (as well as making it easy for people to
    clone to run analysis on if they desire).
 
bluetwo - 1 hours ago
What I worry about is the regulations and certifications many other
industries have to curtail cheating may someday be needed in our
domain. I do not look forward to the day that happens.
 
shmerl - 1 hours ago
Yeah, repealing DMCA 1201 and CFAA would be very useful.Also,
conditional cheating reminded me The Story of Mel, a Real
Programmer: http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/story-of-mel.html
 
dclowd9901 - 1 hours ago
Counterpoint: software such as thermostats that control our energy
consumption or phones that lock themselves while you're driving are
better if people can't consume in a responsible manner.Is it nanny-
state? Yes, but maybe some people need a nanny.
 
  alansammarone - 1 hours ago
  While it is true that some people probably need a nanny, I feel
  like forcing everybody to have a nanny is highly unfair and not a
  viable solution.
 
    AnimalMuppet - 1 hours ago
    Well, if some people need a nanny, and most don't, how do you
    make those who need a nanny to buy the version of the product
    that has the nanny?  Either you force everyone to get the nanny
    version (heavy-handed, especially to those who don't need it),
    or you rely on people who need the nanny version getting it
    (which only helps those who can admit that they have a
    problem).The only other alternative is something like having
    some objective event trigger a legal requirement to have the
    nanny version.  For example, a driving-while-texting ticket
    could trigger a legal requirement to have the nanny version of
    a phone that won't text while you're in a car.
 
      alexanderstears - 1 hours ago
      Same system as DUI ignition interlocks. When people mess up,
      slap restrictions on them.
 
      pdonis - 1 hours ago
      > having some objective event trigger a legal requirement to
      have the nanny versionThe problem with this is, who gets to
      decide which objective event is the trigger? There is no real
      solution to this problem; it always ends up with a hodgepodge
      of arbitrary rules that benefit certain people (those with
      wealth and power), but are a net loss for society as a whole.
 
        AnimalMuppet - 1 hours ago
        Well, either the trigger is legally enforceable, or it is
        not.  If it's legally enforceable, then a legislature gets
        to decide.  If it's not, then either the manufacturer
        decides, or it doesn't happen.
 
  naringas - 42 minutes ago
  > maybe some people need a nanny.children do
 
  breadbox - 29 minutes ago
  But of course the problem here is that the nanny is the
  corporation, which is just as inclined towards -- and far more
  capable of -- advancing itself to the detriment of the consumer.
 
  pdonis - 1 hours ago
  > if people can't consume in a responsible mannerThe problem is
  that in the nanny state regime, the state gets to define what
  counts as "responsible". Which really means certain people (those
  with wealth and power) get to impose their definition of
  "responsible" on everyone else.
 
    npsimons - 30 minutes ago
    Case in point, does anyone really believe seeing a nipple is
    more harmful than seeing violence?
 
  panopticon - 58 minutes ago
  > Yes, but maybe some people need a nanny.As much as a loathe to
  make the slippery slope argument, who decides where the line is?
  What is "okay" nannying, and what pushes the envelope? I think
  there are other ways of encouraging behavior (e.g., non-linear
  energy pricing for electricity) that don't totally remove free
  will from the equation.
 
  cr0sh - 5 minutes ago
  Guess I'll keep my Honeywell mercury tilt switch thermostats a
  little while longer.As for the phone - if things start going this
  route, they can keep the damn thing. I'll figure out some other
  way to communicate, I don't have to have their phone.Furthermore
  - in regards to the thermostat setting: If I have the money to
  pay my bill for what I use, what damn business is it of anyone
  what I do as long as I can pay for it, and it isn't directly
  harming them?Again - they'll have a hard time though bypassing
  tech that's 100+ years old...But if the power company says "well
  - you have to have this to get power from us" - then that just
  moves me one step closer to going off-grid.