GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-04) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The sudden death and eternal life of Solaris
91 points by elvinyung
http://dtrace.org/blogs/bmc/2017/09/04/the-sudden-death-and-eter...
-and-eternal-life-of-solaris/
___________________________________________________________________
 
z1mm32m4n - 53 minutes ago
As someone who's never used Solaris or looked into its merits I'm
curious: can someone comment on why all the nostalgia for Solaris?
 
  Keyframe - 1 minutes ago
  Nostalgia-wise, SunOS (later Solaris) was my first peek at the
  'real' computers which weren't what I was exposed to at home
  (Commodore/Amiga, Spectrum home computers, occasional DOS).
  Likewise with IRIX. Also, as others have said - it was a good
  solid OS.
 
  dozzie - 42 minutes ago
  > As someone who's never used Solaris [...], can someone comment
  on why [...]I can't, because I'm not somebody who's never used
  Solaris.
 
  erentz - 42 minutes ago
  It was solid, well laid out, consistent, and it advanced good
  technology seemingly far ahead of its time. ZFS, dtrace, zones
  (i.e. containers), FireEngine networking, etc.
 
    busterarm - 22 minutes ago
    dtrace has got to be one of the best and most useful (when you
    need it) pieces of software ever written, tbh.
 
  [deleted]
 
  gedy - 37 minutes ago
  It was a solid Unix, it added some diversity to our OS choices,
  and for a time in the 90s Sun had some really stylish hardware
  that ran Solaris.
 
  [deleted]
 
  ams6110 - 35 minutes ago
  There was a time, so I'm told by Oracle DBAs, that Oracle was
  developed on Solaris first, then ported to other platforms. So,
  Solaris had the best support, and least problems. Bugs were fixed
  there first. To quote, "If you're going to run Oracle, you might
  as well run it on Solaris"I guess that is not the case any more.
 
  somnium_sn - 34 minutes ago
  For some Solaris has been one of the first UNIX experiences, as
  it was one of the most popular unices out there. Most university
  used it before Linux became popular.For others, like me, who
  learned Solaris fairly late (2006), Solaris was a testbed for one
  of the best operating system technologies out there. Modern
  filesystem (ZFS), dynamic tracing (dtrace), containerization
  (zones), dependency management during boot (svc) and virtual
  network stack (crossbow), have been in solaris way before Linux.
  Most of modern Linux tools, such as eBPF, systap, btrfs, etc are
  a direct answer to the research done by Sun.So some are nostalgic
  as it's their first experience, others, because it felt like a
  really good operating system a few years ago (despite it's
  quirks).
 
    privong - 24 minutes ago
    >  For some Solaris has been one of the first UNIX experiences,
    as it was one of the most popular unices out there. Most
    university used it before Linux became popular.This was my
    case. I was playing around with Linux, both on my own machine
    at home as well as with a server at my high school (shell
    accounts being a perk of joining the computer club). While
    learning about Linux I also picked up some of the history of
    UNIX. At some point I learned that you could get a copy of x86
    Solaris 7 for for < $50 (I can't remember if this was an
    educational offer or a developer network offer). But I ordered
    one and was really excited to get to use a real UNIX. I played
    with it for a while, but ended up going back to Linux for my
    own computers. Later, in the last year and a half of undergrad
    and my first year of grad school, I used a Sun Ultra 5 to do
    the work for and write my first published paper and do much of
    the work that would end up becoming my MS thesis and my second
    paper (with some of the heavy lifting outsourced to an Ultra 10
    that a postdoc in the research group was using).Every few
    months I browse ebay and look at SPARC machines. Though it's
    not really practically useful, I think it would be cool to have
    an Ultra 5 again.
 
  ajross - 30 minutes ago
  Sun absorbed most of the original BSD team the drove the Unix
  breakout from academia.  Their hardware wasn't necessarily all
  that groundbreaking (starting with 68k boxes like everyone else,
  then moving to an in-house RISC platform that lagged MIPS in most
  ways), but as software SunOS basically defined Unix for most of a
  decade.Now, really that product (SunOS) is not the "Solaris" that
  exists today.  Solaris was a somewhat kludgey merger of the early
  BSD code with the System V tree from AT&T, done as much to settle
  legal issues as for market reasons.  But nonetheless when we all
  look back to the golden days of unix, we see Sun's logo.
 
  BrainInAJar - 15 minutes ago
  Sun was a company that very much focussed on correctness. "Good
  enough", wasn't. Features were delivered complete and solid. The
  downside of that is that features were delivered infrequently,
  and they sacrificed a lot of performance to do the correct thing.
 
brian-armstrong - 52 minutes ago
My only experience with Solaris was on the campus computer lab. It
was also one of the first UNIX experiences I had had.I think what
stood out most was the strongly 90s GUI and focus-follows-cursor,
which seemed very strange at first. It seemed like an interesting
OS with its own quirks
 
  tyingq - 39 minutes ago
  Probably olwm or olvwm.  Either supported a -c switch for click
  to focus.
 
spilk - 42 minutes ago
Does the death of Solaris have any implications for the future of
SPARC? Seemed like most of the SPARC hardware that Oracle
sells/sold exclusively ran Solaris. I could be wrong about that,
though.
 
  tankenmate - 28 minutes ago
  Fujitsu as been the largest manufacturer of SPARC chips for a
  number of years now. They make super computers (and mainframes)
  with SPARC chips although for how much longer... Their latest
  major announcement along side Oracle was in May this year.
 
  jsiepkes - 25 minutes ago
  From what I understand most of the SPARC people got laid of too.
  So unless Fujitsu really ups it's SPARC game I doubt there is
  much future for SPARC.
 
SirLJ - 35 minutes ago
This was the best OS hands down, so sad...
 
wiremine - 32 minutes ago
> ..employees who had given their careers to the company were told
of their termination via a pre-recorded call ? ?robo-RIF?d?Every
single first person or second hand account I've heard about Oracle
makes like a terrible place to work... is this just people being
hyperbolic, or is is truly that terrible?
 
  busterarm - 29 minutes ago
  robo-RIFs are the new normal.Support.com is another big offender.
 
  znpy - 27 minutes ago
  > Every single first person or second hand account I've heardYou
  answered yourself
 
  BrainInAJar - 17 minutes ago
  it very much is a terrible place to work
 
pavlov - 1 hours ago
I always thought Solaris was a beautiful and memorable name for an
operating system.Any connection with the Stanislaw Lem novel (or
Tarkovsky movie) was always a bit unclear to me... But I guess a
book about futile interactions with a planet-sized alien brain that
doesn't care about you other than mysteriously experimenting with
your memories is a reasonable metaphor for the Unix user
experience.
 
  syntheticnature - 2 minutes ago
  I figure the connection is probably more about being from a
  company named "Sun," since it's a Latin word and the source of
  the English adjective "solar" for 'pertaining to the sun.'
 
  type0 - 1 hours ago
  Soderberghs version is much more reflective of what happened with
  the emergence of OpenSolaris and Illumos (not to give away any
  spoilers but apparently forking is a real thing and it lives on).
  Tarkovskys movie was such a philosophical drivel that I feel
  asleep. How is the book - is it worth reading? As I understood it
  neither of films follow the novel very closely.
 
    shmerl - 56 minutes ago
    The book is good.
 
    oelmekki - 26 minutes ago
    I didn't read the book, but being boring is Tarkovsky's touch,
    so it sounds pretty safe to say it comes from him.Also people,
    please don't downvote parent. It's very fair to say this movie
    is boring and confusing, and I think it was the very point.
    Tarkovsky has this style of filming around supernatural / sf
    things but never actually showing them. Instead, he prefers to
    explore the anxiety they cause on humans, anxiety which he
    often represents through long waiting with deceptive
    conclusions, so I would say that feeling annoyed is quite what
    is expected from people watching them. It's art, not
    entertainment.
 
    gpvos - 19 minutes ago
    I haven't seen any of the films, but I loved the book.
 
    inopinatus - 11 minutes ago
    Stanislaw Lem deserves a much wider readership.  Well, I say
    that but actually he has a wide readership, just not so much in
    English-language markets.Besides Solaris, his meditations on
    life and society in The Cyberiad remain some of my favourite
    science fiction of all time.
 
smegel - 27 minutes ago
It never seemed quite right that Solaris and all this awesome
engineering tech from Sun ended up as personal playthings someone
like Larry Ellison.
 
type0 - 1 hours ago
RIP Solaris, it introduced UNIX to me and I will always remember it
fondly.
 
xeeeeeeeeeeenu - 23 minutes ago
I wouldn't call illumos "thriving". Commit activity[1] is low for a
project of this size (compared to e.g. BSDs) and its hardware
support is poor.Probably the biggest problem is the fact that all
existing distributions are undermaintained and unpolished. SmartOS
is the only exception, but it's not a replacement for Solaris which
was a general-purpose server OS. SmartOS is merely a bare-metal
hypervisor.I really hope that some of the laid-off developers will
start contributing to the project. It really needs them.[1] -
https://github.com/illumos/illumos-gate/commits/master
 
runarb - 1 hours ago
> ..employees who had given their careers to the company were told
of their termination via a pre-recorded call ? ?robo-RIF?d?This
sounds awful, and very long from what would be the legal
requirements demanded in the country I live in.What would such a
robot call say?
 
  m_samuel_l - 1 hours ago
  I'd imagine something like "shutdown -h now" or the solaris
  equivalent
 
    zdw - 7 minutes ago
    `shutdown -i 0 -g 0 -y` would be that Solaris equivalent (init
    level 0, grace period 0, yes to all prompts)Solaris and
    derivatives are great OS's and far before their time in so many
    ways.
 
    gruturo - 40 minutes ago
    Solaris would understand that, but Oracle's move was nowhere
    that gentle."uadmin 1 6" was more like it (Immediate poweroff,
    do not even sync disks)
 
    Nursie - 34 minutes ago
    Stop-A :)
 
    mjcl - 34 minutes ago
    Good old killall!
 
  inopinatus - 3 minutes ago
    HCF
 
  nialv7 - 53 minutes ago
  Exactly what I would expect from Oracle