GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-04) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Wind Energy Is One of the Cheapest, and It's Getting Cheaper
224 points by ph0rque
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/plugged-in/wind-energy-is-o...
___________________________________________________________________
 
worldsayshi - 5 hours ago
There's so much misinformation about renewable energy. I was quite
surprised by this.So how does it compare to nuclear energy?
 
  philipkglass - 3 hours ago
  Wind vs nuclear, USA edition:Wind advantages:* Faster to build*
  Electricity production can begin before entire project is
  finished* Lower cost per MWh generated* Much less expensive
  worst-case-scenario failure modes* No cooling water
  requiredDisadvantages:* No guaranteed output without storage add-
  ons* Much lower areal density of annual generation (e.g. "how
  much energy can you generate yearly on a 10 km^2 parcel of
  land?")Other differences:* A nuclear reactor may operate 40-60
  years before replacement; a wind turbine is more like 20-25
  years* Over its full life cycle, a wind farm demands less human
  labor per MWh generatedOn balance, I think that wind has the
  advantage now and for at least the next decade or so. Nuclear
  could become more attractive again once there's a high
  penetration of intermittent renewables on the grid that make
  guaranteed-output sources relatively more valuable. The high
  areal density of nuclear power vs. wind is much more of a
  theoretical than a real advantage in a country like the USA,
  which has low population density by global standards and lots of
  windy area.I put nuclear's long life under "other" rather than
  "advantages" because the other side of "long life" is "long term
  commitment to technology from decades earlier." I also put the
  lower labor demands of wind under "other" because many people
  (not me, but many) consider "providing good jobs" as more of a
  benefit than a burden when they evaluate power sources.
 
  samcheng - 5 hours ago
  Once you factor in the costs to decommission a nuclear facility,
  nuclear becomes one of the most expensive options.
 
    virmundi - 5 hours ago
    When you say that, does it take into account nuclear where we
    reuse fuel?
 
      pjc50 - 5 hours ago
      Fuel sourcing and disposal is a small part of the cost.Edit:
      a projected cost breakdown for Hinkley Point C!
      https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Hinkley-
      Po... (figure 2)So fuel is not inconsiderable; 6.2bn "fuel
      costs", 1.8 "fuel management", 2.6 "fuel disposal". From a
      total of ?54.8 bn.Add 10-50% to actual construction and
      decommissioning costs for overruns.
 
    worldsayshi - 5 hours ago
    And yet still there are so many people that believe that
    nuclear is the only pragmatic path to a green energy future.
 
    RivieraKid - 5 hours ago
    True, but nuclear energy has two important benefits. It has a
    stable output (so you don't have to invest in energy storage)
    and it takes up much less space (so it doesn't visually disrupt
    the landscape as much).
 
      olau - 4 hours ago
      Demand is not stable so you still need energy storage or
      something else to fill the peaks. The only alternative is not
      running the plant at full capacity, which will make it even
      more expensive.Less space: that's true. But you still need a
      fair bit of space to the nearest city. :)
 
        Caveman_Coder - 53 minutes ago
        That is not "the only alternative" in practice. If you're
        in a market (which most companies owning nuclear generation
        are) you'd sell your excess energy, you wouldn't lower the
        output of your nuclear generation resources.
 
        RivieraKid - 3 hours ago
        Yeah, but with nuclear you only have to deal with demand
        variability, not supply variability.
 
      pjc50 - 4 hours ago
      Unless the 1/1000 failure event happens and all the land for
      miles around is rendered uninhabitable and unfarmable.
 
        eru - 4 hours ago
        We could have many, many more Chernobyl and Fukushima style
        disasters, and nuclear would still be safer than real-world
        coal.(But that's an easy target to beat.)
 
        RivieraKid - 3 hours ago
        In modern nuclear reactors, safety is not an issue.
 
          chefkoch - 3 hours ago
          "In modern nuclear reactors, safety is not an
          issue."Russian nuclear engineer, 1985
 
          eropple - 3 hours ago
          Given that the Chernobyl disaster can be traced to
          intentional disabling of safety systems to see what would
          happen, this is lousy, disingenuous snark.(For those not
          so afflicted, "Normal Accidents" has an awesome treatment
          of the Chernobyl disaster.)
 
          chefkoch - 2 hours ago
          So intentional circumventing of safety measures and
          (cost) cutting corners is not possible sich the new
          tech?Almost in every industry  i can think of there are
          countless examples of how profit is traded for safety.
          Why should this be any different?
 
          guscost - 6 minutes ago
          Safety measures which cannot be intentionally
          circumvented (except by planting a bomb, I suppose)
          predate Chernobyl by many years. The RBMK was a horrible
          design which threw away passive safety[0] for convenience
          and cost savings.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive_nu
          clear_safety
 
          RivieraKid - 2 hours ago
          Not sure what your point is.
 
          chefkoch - 2 hours ago
          My point is many technologies were thought of being safe
          untill you encounter this one error, iceberg, negligence.
 
          RivieraKid - 1 hours ago
          Yeah, but at this point, I think the risks of modern
          reactors are understood well-enough to say with
          confidence that safety is not a major argument against
          nuclear energy.
 
        DiThi - 2 hours ago
        All failure events happened due to incompetence and/or
        greed, and increasingly unlikely due to new designs and
        improved protocols.And even assuming those accidents are
        unavoidable, coal still produces more health problems and
        deaths.
 
          pjc50 - 2 hours ago
          I'm glad we've abolished greed and incompetence in this
          future world.(I'm also not sure why so many people are
          playing the nuclear/coal dichotomy when we got into this
          discussion from wind power and the default backup for
          renewables is now CCGT?)
 
          RivieraKid - 1 hours ago
          The situation is completely different now. Reactor design
          is much safer, operational safety is at another level and
          safety risks are more clearly understood.
 
    olau - 5 hours ago
    While decommissioning is indeed expensive and as far as I'm
    aware still mostly based on estimates since there's little
    experience with the full process, I don't think this statement
    is correct.What's really, really expensive is building the
    plant in such a manner that it is both secure and
    maintainable.The problem with securing it is that a critical
    event is so damn expensive (cf. Fukushima) that you need to
    secure it against all imaginable problems - and as you can
    imagine, that list is growing over time. And still, you can't
    buy insurance for a plant. So the government carries the bulk
    of the risk.
 
      DiThi - 3 hours ago
      > you need to secure it against all imaginable problemsIt's
      not that hard if you avoid greedy power plant owners. TEPCO
      was repeatedly warned many years ago that they had to build a
      barrier against tsunamis, and all other plants of the area
      followed the advice.
 
  olau - 5 hours ago
  Traditional nuclear plants are simply too expensive to build.They
  are not competitive, and haven't been for decades if I'm not
  mistaken.It's not impossible that a new design could be cheaper,
  but figuring in both development, test, and time for
  industrialization, we're probably at least 20 years from that.
  Meanwhile, both PV and wind are falling in price from
  industrialization.
 
    edison85 - 5 hours ago
    They are very very cheap, the regulations make up the bulk of
    their costs. Most regulations are important but the costly ones
    are not and it takes 10+ years to get approvals due to
    beuracratic hold ups. Even smoothening those out and keeping
    exact same safety standards would cut prices and time
    significantlyThat said I am very pro Wind. The American Midwest
    is a goldmine for that and I'm very excited to see it increase
    over the next five but I hope they keep the tax credit, wind
    growth will significantly fall without it
 
      hwillis - 4 hours ago
      Not true.  Nuclear is fantastically expensive in every
      country regardless of regulations or NIMBYism.  Regulatory
      expense is a minority problem that exacerbates the core
      issues.The big problems are mostly competency.  A nuclear
      plant requires huge parts from tons of companies all over the
      planet.  People are always messing it up.  The biggest issue
      is that this huge coordination problem makes everything take
      way longer, which means almost everyone involved with the
      plant is sitting around getting paid to do nothing.  That's
      incredibly expensive when the project stretches over a
      decade.
 
  TomK32 - 2 hours ago
  Aside from stuff others mentioned, there's a social/political
  component differing them. Nuclear energy has always been pushed
  by politicians. Harvesting the mighty atom is a prestige project
  and not something a business that wants simple tech that's quick
  to market. Wind energy in comparison is ancient, well-understood
  and something every person can harvest. Same with solar, generate
  your own, very anarchic.
 
tomcam - 4 hours ago
Does no one care that thousands of birds get shredded every year
regardless of endangered status?
 
  haeffin - 4 hours ago
  Illustration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-AYhMoLorI
 
  komaromy - 4 hours ago
  Maybe if it was millions, but thousands of birds is a rounding
  error.
 
  pjc50 - 4 hours ago
  No, they don't; this is only ever brought up in the context of
  wind, and not any of the other risks to birds:
  https://abcbirds.org/program/glass-collisions/
 
  peteretep - 4 hours ago
  No.
 
  stinos - 4 hours ago
  I do think people care. But you should realize that in
  comparision with the hundreds of millions (!) of shredded birds
  because of cars/pesticides/powerlines/... this is peanuts.
 
  russdill - 4 hours ago
  Go look at this chart:http://www.sibleyguides.com/conservation
  /causes-of-bird-mort...Come back and tell me about how people
  bringing up bird strikes is relation to wind power are being
  intellectually honest and not pushing an agenda of some kind.
 
samcheng - 5 hours ago
It's cheap in the places that are windy.  One big challenge
(mentioned tangentially in the article) is in moving this cheap
energy from the windy center of the continent to the populated
coasts.The coolest project to tackle this problem (in my opinion)
is Tres Amigas, a superconducting interchange between the west
coast grid and the (wind-heavy) Texas
grid.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tres_Amigas_SuperStation
 
  KVFinn - 2 hours ago
  It's cheap in the places that are windy. One big challenge
  (mentioned tangentially in the article) is in moving this cheap
  energy from the windy center of the continent to the populated
  coasts.I wish this was higher priority, because the same X is
  already very cheap where it is Y is true of so many renewable
  sources like solar as well.  And a wide power grid with long
  distance markets produces more consistent power since it averages
  different weather in different places and different power sources
  all together.
 
    dsfyu404ed - 1 minutes ago
    To make something that is cheap in X but not on Y cheap in both
    you must first overcome the entrenched special interests who
    make money from that thing being expensive in Y.
 
  jessaustin - 5 hours ago
  Lots of coastline is plenty windy. Why isn't there more offshore
  wind generation in USA like there is in other nations? My
  impression is that rich people who own land on the coast have no
  taste and think that offshore wind generation is an eyesore.
 
    nnfy - 4 hours ago
    Yeah, that'll convince them to our side! Let's insult of their
    taste!Never mind that taste is subjective, and you cannot deny
    that modern wind turbines don't exactly blend with the natural
    horizon, be it sky, mountain, or forest...
 
      freehunter - 3 hours ago
      Well to be fair, skyscrapers don't blend with the horizon.
      Cell towers don't blend with the horizon. Cooling towers and
      smokestacks don't blend with the horizon.The nice thing with
      coal and nuclear power is that rich people can push it's
      production to poorer areas and forget that there are major
      externalities to allow them to flip a light switch. Rejecting
      wind power because it [insert reason here] is just saying
      "make the poor people deal with it". It is quite literally
      one of the most selfish decisions anyone can make, to force
      the world to stay on coal power because wind turbines "don't
      blend with the horizon".
 
        nnfy - 1 hours ago
        No. Don't make this a class warfare thing. The nice thing
        about nuclear/coal power plants is that you dont have to
        pepper the horizon with them. There is substantially less
        visual impact, and with nuclear, far less spatial
        footprint.And plenty of people, rich and poor, oppose
        skyscraper construction because of view loss.What is with
        this inane contemporary idea that we should not be able to
        use wealth to improve our quality of life? This is the
        ultimate form of empty virtue signaling. Why haven't you
        built a turbine on your property yet? I'd venture to guess
        that you're a well off developer, making you top 1% of the
        global population...But it's ok, so long as you have your
        own 1% to sneer at, right? It's their fault that we dont
        have turbines!Classism can be used for the same kind of
        scapegoating that racism and sexism are.
 
          freehunter - 18 minutes ago
          Because here's the argument: I need power. Right now I
          get that power from coal plants. That's bad, right? I
          think that's bad. Let's not do that. Oh, you mean to get
          wind power you need to put the windmill somewhere windy?
          But my house is windy! Nah, let's keep the coal, at least
          I can't see it from my house.The inane contemporary
          argument is that you can use wealth to improve your
          quality of life. Like not burning coal to make
          electricity. Arguing that you'd rather stay on coal power
          than see a windmill isn't trying to improve your quality
          of life, it's actively destroying someone else's quality
          of life.But the lungs of a poor person are worth less
          than the view of a rich person, so that's what happens.
          At least coal doesn't "pepper the landscape?" Jesus
          christ, man. No one is asking you to put a turbine in
          your backyard, you're just throwing a fit about the
          hypothetical potential to maybe possibly one day cast a
          glance at one, and rejecting the idea on that basis.Did
          you know meat comes from dead animals too? Yeah, really
          pretty view from inside a bubble. Real nice horizon.
 
    specialist - 1 hours ago
    I was shocked how windy Cleveland is. I'm told Chicago is more
    so. Windy city indeed. If its pratical to put wind farms in the
    North Sea off the coast of Scotland, I'm guessing using the
    Great Lakes would be too.
 
    strictnein - 5 hours ago
     > "My impression is that rich people who own land on the
    coast..."Yep. An example:http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/04/20/cap
    e.cod.wind.farm/index....
 
    TomK32 - 3 hours ago
    Now you are talking Florida home owners vs boat live-aboards.
 
    ccorda - 5 hours ago
    At least with respect to the west coast:> Unlike the Atlantic
    Ocean, where offshore wind farms can be bolted into the seabed
    in relatively shallow water, the West Coast's continental shelf
    plunges quickly and steeply.http://www.latimes.com/business/la-
    fi-offshore-wind-20160703...
 
      olau - 4 hours ago
      There are efforts underway to develop floating foundations,
      but I believe it's still in the test phase with only a few
      turbines deployed.
 
        nicktelford - 4 hours ago
        The first major floating wind farm is being deployed off
        the coast of Scotland right now!
 
          iheartmemcache - 3 hours ago
          edit: Full mea culpa. Parent is right.  Keeping this post
          intact since it still contains green-relevant information
          and some historical information that may be of interest.
          Big ups to Scotland for pushing this forward. The
          Northerners[0] are doing some clever things too like
          running their own municipal fiber after having their
          pleas being ignored for ages.The Danes have been at it
          for almost the better part of a decade[1]. IIRC, their
          national transport is 100% green 24/7 and has been for a
          few years now. They've hit events where 100% of their
          entire country grid was wind-powered, and are so good at
          it China[2] brought in Danish consultants for assistance.
          Here's a real time chart of their energy infrastructure
          (including exports to Sweden/Norway/Germany)[3].As a MA
          native, I remember people on the Cape would joke about
          the "bridge tax" (i.e., anything coming into the Cape is
          ~25% more). I know until recently[4] their internet
          connectivity was horrenduous. Energy there is fairly
          intermittent as well. Hopefully, they'll pick up a few
          Siemens units (you can pick up retired Siemens Vestas
          units on ebay for < 100k that are rated in the 10s of
          MW!) and deploy a unit or two[6], if only as a PR stunt
          to make themselves look 'progressive'. A win/win if they
          can increase employment and bring jobs to the locals in
          addition to that energy.--[0] http://gizmodo.com/5984187
          /british-farmers-install-their-own... "B4RN" is awesome.
          It's great to see what a community can get done when they
          ((apologies in advance:) broad)band together.[1] https://
          en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_offshore_wind_farms_in...[2
          ] http://www.reuters.com/article/us-denmark-windpower-
          china/ch...[3] https://en.energinet.dk/#energysystem -
          Real time chart! Porn for green energy nerds like me.[4]
          Thier municipality started to offer gigabit through a
          peering with the Boston/North Shore providers to position
          their community as a "business friendly, gigabit ready"
          region in order to attract more businesses, rather than
          relying on the traditional tourist-town economy. They
          brought in some contractors to lay cable from Boston (or
          likely just North of Boston[5]) which is active now with
          tons of businesses using it, though I'm not entirely sure
          if the general populace has FttH.[5] IIRC Andover or
          Quincy or somewheres around there (http://nationwidecoloc
          ation.com/massachusetts_colocation.htm) was one of the
          major peering points where a significant amount of NE
          traffic ran through. Traditionally it has great
          connectivity first due to all of the DARPA peering that
          occured around universities (MIT still has the 18.x.x.x
          class A perma-leased from ARIN). This continued through
          the late 90s/2000s with Verizon using those DC's as their
          major peer-points (which is incidentally why FiOS was
          rolled out so early in the Boston suburbs).[6] You'd have
          to deploy them strategically in a region that isn't going
          to interfere with the yuppies boating experience as they
          go to the Vineyaahhhd on the 4th. NE has the same NIMBY
          problem that SF has in that regard.
 
          Symbiote - 3 hours ago
          The significant word was floating.The Danish offshore
          windfarms have foundations into the sea bed, like the
          other British and Dutch ones that have existed for over a
          decade:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_offshore_win
          d_farms_in...
 
          olau - 4 hours ago
          Yeah, I remembered it as 4 turbines, but it looks like
          it's 5. So as I said, it's a test farm. But yes, it's
          real, production-size turbines, not small scale models. I
          should have clarified that, sorry.I don't think anyone is
          going to build a major farm until this one has been
          running for a couple of years. And they've figured out
          how to cut costs. Happy to be proven wrong, of course.
          :)Statoil isn't the only company working on floating
          foundations, by the way, although I think they are by far
          farthest along when it comes to actually putting a big
          one into production.For instance, the former CTO of
          Siemens Wind Power is working on a design. He's going for
          standard components and as cheap as possible. I wouldn't
          be surprised to see that in a test production in a couple
          of years.
 
      throwaway613834 - 3 hours ago
      What's the reason for going offshore? Is the wind not as
      strong on land?
 
        greglindahl - 2 hours ago
        Most cities are on the coast, so offshore offers generation
        near where it's needed. Doing offshore does not mean
        ignoring on-shore.In some cases offshore winds are strong
        enough that on-shore turbines are less cost effective.
        That's true for some of the east coast of the US.
 
        Tomte - 2 hours ago
        No people complaining about noise, moving shadows and bad
        aesthetics there.
 
        sandworm101 - 3 hours ago
        Fewer issues re land owners.  Wind tends to be more steady
        at sea.
 
        philipkglass - 3 hours ago
        Offshore you can install bigger turbines, because sea
        transportation of turbine components is not size-limited
        like rail/road transport. Taller turbines help to reach
        wind resources that are stronger and steadier. Also, even
        at the same height, offshore wind resources are often
        better than they are a few km inland. Finally, offshore
        wind can supply power to densely populated coastal areas
        when there isn't room to build turbines on land.The
        disadvantages are higher construction and maintenance
        costs; waves and salt water are much more challenging to
        materials than the ordinary conditions onshore turbine
        towers experience.
 
          throwaway613834 - 2 hours ago
          Great, thank you!
 
      eloff - 4 hours ago
      There's a floating wind farm being deployed off Scotland, so
      this could be possible in the future:
      http://www.bbc.com/news/business-40699979
 
        dmix - 2 hours ago
        Those "floating" wind turbines are still bolted to the
        seabed (so they don't float away) and are interconnected
        with wires. They showed how they work via infographics on
        their website that was on the HN frontpage recently. So the
        OP's comment about the sloping sea shelf is still relevant.
 
    jxramos - 5 hours ago
    There was an interesting City Journal article about fishermen
    getting in the mix that caught me by surprise in an interested
    party that never occurred to me before. City Journal has good
    historical background and context that they gather up on
    subjects too... "The mounting opposition to the development of
    offshore wind in Long Island?s waters is the latest example of
    the growing conflict between renewable-energy promoters and
    rural residents. Cuomo and climate-change activists love the
    idea of wind energy, but they?re not the ones having 500-,
    600-, or even 700-foot-high wind turbines built in their
    neighborhoods or on top of their prime fishing spots. The
    backlash against Big Wind is evident in the numbers: since
    2015, about 160 government entities, from Maine to California,
    have rejected or restricted wind projects. One recent example:
    on May 2, voters in three Michigan counties went to the polls
    to vote on wind-related ballot initiatives. Big Wind lost on
    every initiative." https://www.city-journal.org/html/bonackers-
    vs-big-wind-1533...
 
      notatoad - 2 hours ago
      "'Not even Superman standing on Montauk Point could see these
      wind farms,' he said. Maybe not; and maybe wealthy beachfront
      homeowners won?t be able to see the proposed turbines, but
      lots of fishermen will. And that has them spoiling for a
      fight."seriously?  Why on earth does it matter if fishermen
      see wind farms?  when did we invent the rule that all energy
      generation needs to be invisible?
 
        yuliyp - 31 minutes ago
        The point is that they fear that fish will be scared away
        from the area by the presence of the turbines.
 
          notatoad - 9 minutes ago
          Is there any evidence to suggest that's the case though?
          A quick google suggests the opposite to be true. [1]This
          reminds me of the middle-america folks who were claiming
          the wind turbines near their houses caused all kinds of
          disease, including somebody who claimed the wind turbines
          were causing people to contract aids.[1]
          http://www.aqua.dtu.dk/english/News/2012/04/120410_Fish-
          thri...
 
    KVFinn - 3 hours ago
    >Lots of coastline is plenty windy. Why isn't there more
    offshore wind generation in USA like there is in other nations?
    My impression is that rich people who own land on the coast
    have no taste and think that offshore wind generation is an
    eyesore.Offshore has promise but it's significantly higher in
    cost and there isn't a lot of long term data on how well they
    hold up yet.
 
    prbuckley - 2 hours ago
    Does anyone know what the status of using kite powered systems
    for off shore power generation is? I know makani has been
    working on that for over a decade now, it always seemed like a
    really promising approach to me but I haven't heard of any
    commercial applications of it. Here is a link to
    makani...https://x.company/makani/about/
 
    samcheng - 5 hours ago
    Offshore wind is considerably more expensive to build,
    maintain, and interconnect.This article suggests that offshore
    wind is 3X as expensive as onshore
    wind:http://www.windpowermonthly.com/article/1380738/global-
    costs...That puts offshore wind as more expensive than gas
    turbines, for example.  And that's assuming an offshore wind
    project could get past NIMBY opposition.  There's a lot more
    land in the Midwest than there is coastline.
 
      olau - 4 hours ago
      Without floating foundations, offshore depends a lot on the
      specifics of the oceanbed. But DONG Energy, which I think is
      the world biggest developer of offshore wind, recently gave a
      bid on a subsidy of zero for a farm near Germany. Final
      investment decision is still in a couple of years so they may
      pull out of the bid if things don't develop as expected, but
      not without paying a big fee.So offshore is expected to get
      cheaper.There's a comparison with nuclear down in the thread.
      I think one important thing to keep in mind here is that
      these cost reductions coming from industrialization and
      improved economies of scale are REAL. They happen year over
      year, has happened for decades, and they will surely lower
      the price even further in the future. Just like solar. And
      battery tech for that matter. It's incremental improvements.
 
        [deleted]
 
          sctb - 4 hours ago
          Please don't post unsubstantively
          here.https://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html
 
      Theodores - 4 hours ago
      But what happens if you have a place like the North Sea
      surrounded by facilities for deploying oil rigs and
      associated infrastructure, for the oil to run out? There is
      considerable sunk cost in the infrastructure and with some
      subsidies to keep yards busy (as such things are needed for
      national security reasons) it all becomes a lot easier.
 
        olau - 4 hours ago
        What happens is that you get crazy plans like
        this:http://cphpost.dk/news/denmark-looking-into-building-
        north-s...In a couple of decades, I think the North Sea is
        going have vast areas full of wind turbines.
 
  jabl - 5 hours ago
  cool ... superconducting ... yeah, har har, I get it.Seriously
  though, is that really cost competitive compared with HVDC
  transmission which has losses of around 3%/1000 km?
 
  gordon_freeman - 3 hours ago
  Not sure if it's relevant question here but here I go: I was
  driving from LA towards Joshua Tree National Park and I saw so
  many wind turbines which were not operating even though there was
  plenty of wind blowing and the adjacent wind turbines were
  running. Is there any reason they were not operating? Can't be
  maintenance problem as I saw so many not running.
 
    SpikedCola - 1 hours ago
    I believe this is because wind turbines are brought online and
    taken offline according to demand. Nukes/gas stations can't
    have capacity adjusted very quickly, and take hours to get up
    to full production. Wind can be started/stopped quickly as
    demand rises and falls throughout the day"Demand response may
    also be used to increase demand during periods of high supply
    and/or low demand. Some types of generating plant must be run
    at close to full capacity (such as nuclear), while other types
    may produce at negligible marginal cost (such as wind and
    solar)."[0][0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demand_response
 
    168 - 2 hours ago
    Perhaps turning off some turbines can provide a marginal
    increase in efficiency for the entire turbine farm?
 
    danieka - 3 hours ago
    If the wind force is too much for the turbine/blades to handle
    I think that the blades are locked in place. Don't know if
    that's what you saw though.
 
    z2 - 2 hours ago
    It could be curtailment due to overcapacity or lack of
    transmission infrastructure to get the electricity to consumers
    [1]. I'm not quite sure why a more expensive source wouldn't be
    shut down instead, but maybe the unpredictability of wind power
    makes them the first to fall when demand is low?1:
    https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/why-arent-those...
 
      Caveman_Coder - 1 hours ago
      The key thing is reliability and most Balancing Authorities
      will have procedures dictating which generation comes
      offline.
 
  adrusi - 5 hours ago
  Of course, if we just wait long enough, the coasts will move
  inland, making then problem conveniently easier.
 
    freehunter - 3 hours ago
    Yeah and after they build wind turbines inland and the coasts
    recede, the land owners will now start complaining that these
    now-offshore turbines are ruining their waterfront view of the
    sunken remains of Miami.
 
  Retric - 5 hours ago
  The US is only 2000 miles wide so from the center that's just
  ~1000 miles which is fine even with normal power lines.  You can
  do high voltage DC power transmission over 4 times that distance.
 
    AstralStorm - 4 hours ago
    At non-negligible losses. (Expected about 10% for the whole
    system.) Not to mention maintenance of such long cable will be
    real hard, so redundancy is needed. (For comparison, check
    costs on much easier and cheaper transatlantic fibre cables.)
    And of course a facility placed further of the shore is harder
    to maintain as well.
 
      svens_ - 3 hours ago
      Not sure what you're getting at, apart from the loss the same
      disadvantages also apply if the cable is superconducting.Even
      worse, maintenance and running costs of superconducting
      cables are likely much higher due to the cooling (high
      temperature superconductors are "high temperature" in
      comparison to other superconductors - there's still lots of
      cooling needed).
 
architectonic - 2 hours ago
we at energy&meteo systems
https://www.energymeteo.com/about_us/company.php provide means for
overcoming the fluctuation problem of renewable energy while
offering some cool software services. Two main methods for
achieving that are the virtual power plants and would class
forecast of the productivity of wind and solar power plants. We're
based in Germany but have customers all over the world including
the US. Find out more on our website or contact us.
 
freddref - 4 hours ago
Could someone comment on solid state solutions to harnessing wind
energy?
 
  ajross - 4 hours ago
  An electrical generator is 100% solid state up to the output wire
  (battery storage may not be).  Not sure what your question is.
 
    emiliobumachar - 3 hours ago
    I think "solid state" is being used as meaning "no moving
    parts".
 
    WJW - 4 hours ago
    Except for the spinning parts you mean? Those bearings run out
    and need maintenance.Ontopic: There are some preliminary design
    for electrostatic wind energy converters: see for example
    http://www.wired.co.uk/article/bladeless-wind-turbine-ewicon
 
  andrewl - 3 hours ago
  This is the closest thing I'm aware of, but I'm not educated in
  this field:https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22930552-600-pl
  astic-...The "grass" generates electricity when it waves back and
  forth in the wind.
 
  TeMPOraL - 3 hours ago
  Are there any? I can't imagine how one would harvest kinetic
  energy without moving parts...
 
dumbfounder - 3 hours ago
And here's why it doesn't matter for most of the US: energy
companies are regulated to make a percentage of the money they
spend. This incentivizes them to SPEND MORE MONEY for energy so
they can make more money. Until we fix that, most of us are screwed
(at least the ones who can't get off or mostly off the
grid).Sources: My friend who runs an energy company and I also
found it here: http://blog.aee.net/how-do-electric-utilities-make-
money
 
  juiyout - 2 hours ago
  In my home country, due to electricity being classified as daily
  necessities, the profit is being regulated almost the same way as
  the article you cited above.    US Version:     Total Revenue
  Requirement = Rate Base ? Allowed Rate of Return (About 10%) +
  *Expenses*      Taiwan Version:     Total Revenue Requirement =
  Rate Base ? Allowed Rate of Return (About 3%)      , Rate Base is
  utility company's asset.  I believe there is a huge difference
  between above 2 formulas.Thus, according to the GP article: US
  cost 2-4 cent/kWH, price 12 cent/kWH Yet, Taiwan cost 6 cent/kWH,
  price 9 cent/kWHThe difference between price and cost would be
  reasonable profit and expenses including tax/regulation fees,
  pollution fees, renewable energy research funds, equipment
  deprecation, interest, salaries, maintenance, etc.In Taiwan,
  profit plays an insignificant part in electricity price.
 
  cc439 - 3 hours ago
  "And here's why it doesn't matter for most of the US: energy
  companies are regulated to make a percentage of the money they
  spend."This is also found in the ACA (Obamacare) in the form of a
  minimum medical loss ratio. Insurers must spend 80% of what they
  take in from premiums on direct medical care and their profit is
  capped at 3% of premiums. It disincentivizes cost reductions as
  3% of $5 billion is a lot more than 3% of $1 billion.
 
    juiyout - 2 hours ago
    Apology to bring up Taiwan again in the same thread.Taiwan's
    national health insurance was once praised by Michael Porter
    and other Nobel prize laureates. It was marveled as the best
    invention to bring to the masses. Basically, Taiwan congress
    establishes a fixed budget for health care for next year. Then
    no matter how many patients or how expensive it runs next year,
    National Health Insurance Administration pays the hospital
    proportionally by assigning "points" to treatments.For example,
    pulling one wisdom tooth is 10 points. 1 point is 1 dollar last
    year then 10 points earn the hospital 10 dollar last year. This
    year it may go down to 0.8 dollar per point then 10 points mean
    8.8 dollar due to more patient visits/treatment higher cost
    nationally. All the while, the cost of treatment hasn't really
    changed.Now when NHI started out, it was indeed 1 TWD per
    point. Now it has gone to 0.5 TWD per point. (Detail varies,
    this is the gist of it). Hospital jobs are not as good as it
    used to be nowadays.
 
menacingly - 2 hours ago
I don't really know what I'm talking about, but I bring this up
when we talk about wind energy and I've never had a satisfying
answer. Maybe that's due to not knowing what I'm talking
about.Since the wind does other stuff beyond just feeling breezy,
it stands to reason that there exists some level of wattage we
could pull out of it that would have undesirable effects.If there
were no wind tomorrow, we can agree that this would be bad. Are
there lower levels of energy depletion where the effects would be
subtler and harder to anticipate? Would pulling 0.5% of the wind's
energy result in shifts in weather patterns, even if it's
localized?I mean, since we're collectively so good at breaking
things, maybe it's worth assuming we will fill some hypothetical
area with as many contraptions to take energy from the wind as we
can, and that these contraptions will get increasingly
effective.EDIT: There are some great replies to this, and the minds
of HN are always an awesome resource to tap. I guess I can't shake
the vague spooky feeling I get from interfering with a massive
system that feeds into itself in unpredictable ways, but it sounds
like ruthless expansion of some massive drain on the wind system is
unlikely/impossible.
 
  clairity - 59 minutes ago
  it's good to think through, but first order intuition on this
  (for me) goes something like:1. the wind gets it's power
  (directly and indirectly) from the sun and we"re just too
  miniscule to affect that in any meaningful way.2.on top of that,
  we return most of the acquired energy back to the atmosphere in
  the form of heat.3. and we haven't built anything close to large
  and extensive enough in one place to create even micro-
  environmental effects.we're just too miniscule to matter so it's
  a problem that might affect the planet in 1000 years when there
  are trillions(?) of people on earth but not worth worrying too
  much about now. by then, we might have become the brains of a
  superorganism or something and then it's time to worry =)
 
    ams6110 - 27 minutes ago
    > we're just too miniscule to affect that in any meaningful
    wayThough this same argument is dismissed by those who support
    the idea that we're changing the weather by CO2 emissions.
 
      function_seven - 4 minutes ago
      In terms of wind energy, rotating mills are not going to have
      any measurable impact on wind energy or patterns.But with
      CFCs, we clearly aren?t minuscule. We saw a hole in the ozone
      layer that opened when we used them, and is closing now that
      we?ve stopped.For some things, we?re too minuscule, for
      others we?re not.
 
  mhluongo - 1 minutes ago
  Glad I'm not the only one who's thought about this :)
 
  throwaway613834 - 2 hours ago
  I understand the amount we might ever extract pales in comparison
  to the amount that would upset any natural phenomena.
 
    juiyout - 2 hours ago
    Is it true that we once had the same rationale with coal?
 
  [deleted]
 
  DennisP - 2 hours ago
  I've seen studies of this before, and googling "wind energy
  climate effects" pulls some up. I think the upshot was that there
  would be some climate effects but it would take a truly massive
  expansion of wind energy to amount to much, and would still be
  much less damaging than fossil fuels.
 
  std_throwaway - 2 hours ago
  Wind must blow in order to extract energy from it. Therefore, we
  will never slow down wind to zero with windmills. Also we already
  have mountains changing weather patterns. Sure, the weather
  patterns will change at some point as windmills grow to mountain
  size but in this case we will notice it way before it goes out of
  hand. In an emergency situation we can bring the windmills down
  at free fall speed with some thermate and gasoline.
 
    menacingly - 1 hours ago
    Yeah, it must blow to get there, but it by definition has less
    "blow" on the other side. I think I'm getting that the scale of
    this is negligible, but it is certainly less
 
  jws - 2 hours ago
  The way I look at it, if you consider the air mass from ground
  level up to the top of the atmosphere, the bottom will always
  have a roughly zero speed since it is down in the terrain and the
  weeds. A carpet of windmills a hundred meters tall could at best
  move that zero speed edge a little higher. The kilometers of air
  above will be relatively unaffected.To illustrate, consider
  https://embed.windy.com/embed2.html?lat=41.327&lon=-88.033&z...
  which if I've got that URL right will show you winds at a
  windmill farm in Illinois USA (nope, it misses slightly for some
  reason, odd, it is right when I copy it). Look in the lower right
  of the screen and find the slider with an airplane at the top and
  a mountain at the bottom. You can use this to change altitudes
  and explore the wind speed above ground level. Lots more
  windspeed up there even if the density goes down. Consider the
  5500 meters up, about half the air pressure, but twice the wind
  speed today, so that works out to twice the energy per square
  foot (on edge).
 
  andlier - 2 hours ago
  Even if we covered the earth in windmills, we'd still only affect
  the lowest 100-200m of the atmosphere. And windmills can only
  extract 50% of the winds energy. I'm thinking a forest full of
  trees might even reduce the windspeed more than a field of mills.
 
    Namrog84 - 2 hours ago
    I don't know how practical they are but I've seen that
    inflatable flying windmill wind turbine thing that is meant to
    be 500-1000ft or higher? So doesn't that make the 100-200m a
    bit low on what altitude we can extract from?
 
      menacingly - 1 hours ago
      And I assume that the two systems (upper and lower
      atmosphere) aren't so isolated from one another that they
      don't interact
 
  Jackim - 2 hours ago
  Here's a study that evaluated exactly what you're looking for, if
  I understand correctly:
  http://www.mdpi.com/1996-1073/2/4/816/htmIn summary, if the
  entire Earth was powered by wind, it would result in a net loss
  in the lowest 1 km of the atmosphere of ~0.007%.
 
    menacingly - 2 hours ago
    Looks like some far more competent folks have pretty thoroughly
    looked into it. I'll sleep better knowing I'm not the wind's
    sole protector
 
  alphydan - 2 hours ago
  The question has been asked in the past and modelled with some
  level of detail.  For example: Estimating maximum global land
  surface wind power extractability and associated climatic
  consequences [0].At a higher level the question is easy:  Sun
  shines, warms the air more in the tropics, creates a gradient,
  and wind flows.  What if we capture all this energy?  But the
  details of the calculation are subtle. The cited paper says: It
  could have dire climatic consequences!But it may be over-
  estimating how many locations are really suitable for wind
  turbines.  Many things limit the efficiency (i.e. cost
  effectiveness) of a wind farm (turbulence, minimum average wind
  speed, maximum speeds, access to the site, distance from cities,
  etc).One important point is that most of the energy exchange
  happens at high altitude (where the turbines can't reach).[0]
  https://www.earth-syst-dynam.net/2/1/2011/esd-2-1-2011.pdf
 
  MicroBerto - 1 hours ago
  The star-studded and scientifically profound movie Southland
  Tales touches upon this, but with respect to tidal energy. It's
  quite a fascinating story that you may enjoy, given your
  questions.
 
  mythrwy - 21 minutes ago
  Based on that line of reasoning you ought to be really nervous
  about solar panels :)
 
  [deleted]
 
anon_dev_123456 - 3 hours ago
They need to figure out how to keep these things away from people's
homes.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQksc1-5ZocImagine living in
this constant flicker, I would go insane.
 
  throwawayjava - 3 hours ago
  I completely agree with you.(It's worth nothing that fracking and
  coal mining are even worse.)
 
falcolas - 4 hours ago
I think they buried the lede: wind is so cheap because of tax
credits. Once those are taken out, it's simply competitive with the
LNG power generation, and about 2/3 of coal.Turbines require a ton
of high risk maintenance, and have limited lifespans due to the
stresses they are put through.Still very good, but not as good as
the headline and the first half of the article claims.
 
  whyenot - 3 hours ago
  Fossil fuels in the US also receive government subsidies, at
  least indirectly, don't they? If you take out wind's tax credits,
  shouldn't you also account for those as well?
 
  the_why_of_y - 3 hours ago
  Wind needs some subsidies so it can compete with the huge
  subsidies for carbon based fuels.http://www.imf.org/external/pubs
  /cat/longres.aspx?sk=42940.0
 
abpavel - 4 hours ago
Sure, instead of destroying climate indirectly by heating
atmosphere, let's destroy it directly by blocking wind paths.Last
time it happened, it created the largest desert in the world - just
look at the effect Himalayas had on Sahara.
 
  usaphp - 4 hours ago
  Do you think solar panels also change climate by taking the
  sunlight away from the otherwise heated earth?
 
    abpavel - 3 hours ago
    Nothing is going to grow underneath the solar panels. At least
    with solar panels you can selectivaly decide where nothing
    should grow. With roofs it's already an easy decision. With
    wind paths - not so much.
 
      eropple - 3 hours ago
      I assume, before posting this very serious set of comments,
      that you have exhaustively researched exactly how much
      turbine surface area would be needed to cause climactic
      impacts and are prepared to show your work, especially around
      how a sub-percent surface area of the Himalayas would cause
      such drastic results in a desert a continent away. I would
      love to see this sterling research I'm certain you have
      conducted. Please educate all of us so that we can be
      enlightened as to the turbine menace.
 
        abpavel - 3 hours ago
        What's the use? You're in denial mode anyway. http://iopsci
        ence.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/11/4/044...
        "Specifically, we discovered that operational wind turbines
        raised air temperature by 0.18 ?C"
 
          jacquesm - 51 minutes ago
          > You're in denial mode anyway.I don't think that's the
          case.> Specifically, we discovered that operational wind
          turbines raised air temperature by 0.18 ?CYes, and gas
          turbines, coal plants and cooling towers of nuclear
          plants raise the air temperature by how many degrees?That
          0.18 degrees celsius is just for the slice of wind that
          moved trough the plane of rotation, it will quickly mix
          with other air because it is fairly turbulent once it
          gets behind the mill reducing the air temp quickly back
          to ambient. The major reason for this is that the air
          molecules hit the blades causing them (and the blades!)
          to get heated up.Windmill blades move ~225 Kph at the
          tips so there is plenty of opportunity for some friction.
          It would be far more surprising if the air did not heat
          up. Still, there is net energy extracted from the moving
          air so any heating is an extremely low priority side
          effect.
 
  jcbrand - 4 hours ago
  The Sahara is in Africa and the Himalayas are in Asia. So not
  much effect I presume. You probably mean the Gobi desert.
 
    abpavel - 3 hours ago
    Yes, I meant the climate formations moving from the north pole,
    and Himalayas affecting the amount of precipitation reaching
    North Africa. Can't find that larticular animation at the
    moment though.
 
  bdamm - 4 hours ago
  Seems ok to me. If anything we ought to be removing some of the
  energy we're so enthusiastically adding to the atmosphere.
 
    abpavel - 2 hours ago
    If you mean temperature, then wind turbines actually increase
    temperature (friction, inefficiencies...) of locale climate.
    Solar panels cool the Earth, not turbines.Wind is a byproduct
    of solar power. Why not derive energy from the primary source
    (solar) instead of going for secondary (wind).Edit: really
    curious about downvotes. There is nothing in the above that's
    controversial. I've also provided data below: http://iopscience
    .iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/11/4/044.... "Specifically,
    we discovered that operational wind turbines raised air
    temperature by 0.18 ?C"
 
mabbo - 4 hours ago
The only problem is variability. I know that many places have
fairly stable wind 99% if the time, but it's the absolute lowest
you need to worry about.If we are to rely on wind as a power
source, we either have to only rely on its lowest output or else
rely on its typical output, but have a second source that can be
easily scaled up and down. The problem is that the good sources of
energy that can scale up and down well and cheaply are coal and
natural gas.Nuclear, by contrast, works best when is outputting
constant amounts of energy.
 
  olau - 4 hours ago
  I think in many places, gas peakers are already available. In the
  long run, we're probably going to need to do something else, but
  who knows where storage tech is in twenty years?In Denmark, home
  of the biggest wind power companies, this is a frequent topic of
  discussion among people interested in energy, but the answer is
  really that there are many options on the table, including
  expanding the grid. While many options are too expensive to see
  much use today, that will probably change over years.New ideas
  are also coming up, e.g. thishttp://www.salon.com/2017/08/09
  /alphabet-turns-to-molten-sal...which might work except they
  should just store the heat in rocks instead of molten salt which
  is a PITA to work with. I know of at least two independent
  designs (both Danish) that store the heat in a huge repository of
  insulated rock/dirt and use a turbine to get electricity back
  out, at an efficiency about 40-45% IIRC. A prototype plant
  recently received funding. Not sure it has reached the
  international press yet. I don't think it has much future in
  Denmark, though, there's plenty of hydro in Scandinavia.
 
    biehl - 2 hours ago
    This is a fun energy storage project -
    http://www.aresnorthamerica.com/
 
  biehl - 2 hours ago
  If you really mean that "it's the absolute lowest you need to
  worry about.", then Nuclear plants working 99% of the time, but
  going off-line for maintenance must really worry you?Seems like a
  huge disadvantage for nuclear?Also the fact that nuclear works
  best when outputting constant amounts of energy doesn't really
  seem to be an advantage -
  https://www.euractiv.com/section/electricity/news/german-nuc... ?
 
  tbihl - 3 hours ago
  Your point about nuclear is interesting; do you know an
  approximate magnitude disadvantage of varying nuclear plant
  output?Presumably it's a concern of cool-down thermal stresses,
  or perhaps flux tilting/uneven fuel burnout. Or is it something
  else entirely?
 
    biehl - 2 hours ago
    Fuel rod oxidation?
    https://www.euractiv.com/section/electricity/news/german-nuc...
 
  DenisM - 3 hours ago
  Powerwall can level the load.And making Powerwalls can turn out
  rather cheap: electric car batteries degrade towards low
  energy/weight ratio, but it hardly matters for a stationary
  installations. Two used li-ion car batteries - one happy
  household.
 
    hwillis - 3 hours ago
    > electric car batteries degrade towards low energy/weight
    ratioAnd even then- barely.  The Panasonic NCR18650B has a
    weight of 3.94 kg/kWh at the beginning of its life, and a
    weight of 4.92 kg/kWh after it's considered "dead".  The
    average US household uses 30 kWh/day, which would require 117
    kg of new batteries (in practice the pack will weigh double
    that) or an extra 29 kg if you use old batteries with 300k
    miles on them.  That's an immaterial difference for almost any
    purpose.Used car batteries will be incredible.  Salvaged Tesla
    modules are already starting to have impacts on hobbyists, but
    if used cells make it to market at even just a 25% discount
    it'll be incredibly awesome.
 
  eru - 4 hours ago
  Some alternatives for quick scaling up and down:- finding some
  big consumers (like aluminium smelters) that can scale down.-
  batteries (both as scalable consumers and suppliers); widespread
  electric car usage might accidentally help her
 
    krrrh - 4 hours ago
    > batteries (both as scalable consumers and suppliers);
    widespread electric car usage might accidentally help herI've
    been in a some jurisdictions that have periods of low water
    supply where you can't water your lawn or garden on certain
    days, or sometimes based on whether your house has an odd or
    even number. Imagine the same applied to fueling up your car.
    Not enough wind and sun this week, sorry you'll have to stretch
    out the capacity you put into your car last week.Obviously
    demand could be shaped with spot pricing, but it's interesting
    to imagine how rolling brownouts would affect mobility and
    transportation.
 
  bdamm - 4 hours ago
  Hydro scales quickly and cheaply (run-time, not capex.)
 
  hwillis - 4 hours ago
  Coal isn't really any better than nuclear, and can take days to
  ramp up.  Natural gas makes up virtually all fossil peaker plants
  and most load-following plants.
 
nikolay - 3 hours ago
The current method to harness wind energy is primitive and leads to
visual pollution of the landscape. We're swimming in a vast ocean
of endless energy, and, yet, we use very primitive mechanical means
to harness it!
 
shmerl - 2 hours ago
So why aren't prices going down? On the contrary, if you subscribe
to use something like Arcadia Power, you'd actually pay a bit more
than regular electric bill.
 
tchaffee - 5 hours ago
And yet we have a president promising to bring back coal. If only
our population could elect leaders who will keep up with the
outstanding technology the US scientific community (really the
global scientific community) produces.EDIT: It would be nice if
folks down voting could leave a comment so I could learn what the
objection is. I saw no mention in other comments about this
specific challenge that America faces in terms of growing renewable
energy installations.
 
  savanaly - 4 hours ago
  I downvote every comment that complains about being downvoted,
  for what it's worth. Let the chips fall where they may, the place
  to discuss why something is or isn't downvoted is somewhere else,
  never in the replies to a comment that's purportedly about
  something substantial.
 
    tchaffee - 3 hours ago
    Downvote away. I'm more interested in learning than I am in
    internet points. And thank you for your comment explaining your
    downvote.
 
  sctb - 4 hours ago
  We started with the topic of the price of wind energy, and now
  we're into generic political controversy with no steps in-
  between. Do you see how that takes us from a concrete discussion
  into tedious flamewar territory?The guidelines ask us not to do
  that, and also not to complain about
  voting.https://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html
 
    tchaffee - 3 hours ago
    I wasn't complaining about the voting. I'm fine with getting my
    comments downvoted as long as I can learn why. Without an
    explanation it might take me a lot time to guess what I did
    wrong and to improve. Isn't it better for the entire community
    if I improve my comments quickly?> Do you see how that takes us
    from a concrete discussion into tedious flamewar territory?If
    current US politics weren't relevant to the future of renewable
    energy, then sure. I thought it was a relevant concern. What I
    wrote isn't a political opinion, it's a fact. I have read the
    guidelines and I do try to be careful about posting stuff
    that's purely a political opinion.Thanks for your comment, it
    was helpful even if I don't agree 100%. At least I now know
    which of the guidelines you think I was not following.
 
  mchannon - 5 hours ago
  There's a lot of metallurgical coal necessary for the
  construction of certain high-grade steels, such as those you'd
  find in wind turbines.Similarly, try and make a PV solar cell
  without coal in the value chain.  You can't (I can).Arguably,
  some coal jobs are green jobs.The thermal coal industry, long on
  the ropes, and not at all green, has not been recovering.
 
    hwillis - 4 hours ago
    Steel does not require coke (which can also be made from things
    other than coal):
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Direct_reduced_ironSteel is <2%
    of US coal consumption, too.  It's basically irrelevant to coal
    as a pollution or economic issue.Any resource that uses coal
    can be replaced by a renewable source.  Coal is just a carbon
    source, and carbon is one of the most accessible elements.
    Producing very pure carbon from biomaterials produces energy
    and is very similar to the production of coke from coal.  It's
    very economical and the only reason it isn't used is because
    coal is so insanely cheap.
 
    Something1234 - 4 hours ago
    > Similarly, try and make a PV solar cell without coal in the
    value chain. You can't (I can).What do you mean by "(I can)"?
 
      mchannon - 3 hours ago
      Patent-pending technology.  Email me for details.
 
    jabl - 5 hours ago
    > There's a lot of metallurgical coal necessary for the
    construction of certain high-grade steels, such as those you'd
    find in wind turbines.Sure. Though I don't see how that should
    preclude getting rid of coal for power and heat generation?
 
k__ - 3 hours ago
Yet people hate it from the bottom of their heart, it seems.A
friend of mine works for a company that builds these things in
Germany and he says most people hate it.And even those who like it
say, they can't allow them to build on their property, because
their neighbours would hate them for it.People say these things are
loud, ugly, kill birds and bats etc. pp.They could have done so
much to decentralise energy production, somehow the most are built
and owned by big energy corps so they can tell the world how
"green" they are...
 
  anon_dev_123456 - 3 hours ago
  They suck! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQksc1-5Zoc - No one I
  know would enjoy living in this conditions.
 
  Xylakant - 3 hours ago
  Having lived in viewing distance of two nuclear power plants in
  germany, I can tell you I vastly prefer wind turbines. Coal power
  plants are not exactly beautiful either. Germany is a densely
  populated country, there's practically no space where you can
  build anything without disturbing someone. I'm afraid we'll have
  to disturb someone if we want electricity.
 
    deusex_ - 2 hours ago
    That's one of the advantages of off shore turbines, no
    disturbing.
 
    k__ - 2 hours ago
    Yes, same here.I lived in viewing distance to AKW Biblis, the
    sun basically set behind it in the evening, kinda surreal
    picture, haha.I also regularly go on vacation on a farm that
    has multiple wind turbines in viewing and hearing distance,
    find them kinda soothing.
 
      Xylakant - 2 hours ago
      The Rhine valley is crazy with nuclear plants. A few
      kilometers upstream from Biblis is Philippsburg and then
      there's Fessenheim on the French side and Leibstadt in
      Switzerland. That makes 4 nuclear plants on 350km of Europes
      largest river valley.
 
mrfusion - 5 hours ago
How close are we to mass deployment of rooftop turbines?  Seems
like the installation could be way cheaper than solar.
 
  jabl - 4 hours ago
  Very far? In wind turbines, bigger is better, as bigger turbines
  are mounted on higher towers and thus get stronger and more
  consistent winds.
 
  ghaff - 3 hours ago
  Micro wind turbines were a hot topic for a while before solar
  started getting a lot cheaper. In general, the ROI was always
  mostly suspect (except where you needed off-grid power). They're
  still sold but you don't hear much about them.As others have
  said, it's not great for placement and small blades are not
  really what you want for wind power.
 
  RALaBarge - 4 hours ago
  As jabl says, it is a question of the surface area of the
  blades.Another consideration is the noise that they make.  I am
  from rural Michigan initially, and the main push back from the
  residents (aside from seeing them) is hearing the constant /
  woosh woosh woosh / noise that you can hear if you live close
  enough.  That said again that noise would be proportional to the
  area of the blades themselves.I presume they become part of the
  background noise as these people have no complaints about the
  huge trucks that air break down the 2 lane highway connecting
  these areas to civilization and I notice it when I am back in the
  area.
 
    eloff - 4 hours ago
    Plus you'd need a way to clean up the dead birds. I know my
    mother loves all her birds that come to her bird feeders (she
    names them!), she'd never install a wind turbine around her
    house.
 
      pjc50 - 4 hours ago
      Turbines are about as dangerous as windows. Although you can
      alleviate that with stickers. https://abcbirds.org/program
      /glass-collisions/
 
    Tuna-Fish - 4 hours ago
    > As jabl says, it is a question of the surface area of the
    blades.Not just the surface area, but also altitude from
    ground.Unlike solar panels, wind turbines really want to be
    big. The cost/watt goes down rapidly as the size of the unit
    increases -- the reason for the cost of wind electricity being
    driven as low as it is is basically that the turbines have been
    made larger.
 
mrfusion - 5 hours ago
I wonder how many turbines we'd need to be able to run them
inreverse and affect the weather.Edit:  I know we're no where close
to doing this but how far is it. Are we 1% of the way there?
 
  russdill - 1 hours ago
  This sounds like an excellent xkcd what-if
 
  Retric - 4 hours ago
  Even a small fan slightly changes the weather.  But let's say you
  want a 5MPH light breeze across the US.
  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaufort_scaleThe atmosphere is
  really heavy.  14.696 pounds per square inch, but you don't need
  to alter it all call it the bottom 10 pounds * (5280mile/foot *
  12foot / inch)^2 * 3.797 million square miles across the US.  =
  1.5 ^ 17 pounds.That is 1.25 x 10 ^ 17 joules.  Let's say your
  doing this over 1 hour that's 35,000 GW vs 82 GW of actual wind
  power generation.Of course a 50MPH wind (strong gale) needs 100
  times as much power and drag is going prevent this from being
  even close to 100% efficient.PS: I suspect I am really messing up
  the units here.
 
    snovv_crash - 2 hours ago
    This assumes the wind is flowing over a frictionless surface
    with no protrusions. In reality trees, mountains etc cause drag
    below, and other atmosphere causes drag above. Drag is
    proportional to the cube of speed, so I really don't think a
    wind turbine will be able to affect wind speed much. Well, not
    more than reforestation would, and wind turbines don't even
    cause local temperature or humidity differences like a forest
    would.
 
  horsecaptin - 5 hours ago
  Wind wars?
 
fit2rule - 3 hours ago
I'd be quite happy stepping off the grid and having my own small
suite of power-harvestors, out on the property and so on, and
generally share the overage of the system with any other nomad who
needed to charge their suit, so to speak.I've sort of come to the
personal belief that the way to solve the power crisis is for us
all to be harvesting it from the most local sources, and .. perhaps
.. become less dependent on mass/social- infrastructure, reducing
our group load, decomposing cities, &etc.The technology is there.
I could easily live off the stream and wind energy in most of the
world, personally.I just don't quite have the harvesting device.  I
wonder what an "iEnergyHarvester", y'know .. the cool new
disruptive kind .. would look like?
 
  mythrwy - 12 minutes ago
  I live in a very windy rural area and looked at getting a small
  wind turbine.But after researching I gave up the plan. The reason
  is maintenance. Every year have to find a way to get up to the
  thing and grease (too high and not suitable for a ladder, means
  renting a manlift at $300+). Also parts can go out and apparently
  do from time to time, it's mechanical with a lot of stress and
  movement. Can't buy these parts at home depot which means keeping
  a large inventory on hand or else potentially being down while
  on-line order comes in. The estimated expense barely justified
  the purchase (over a long period, I don't recall details but had
  it figured out at one point), with estimated repairs,
  particularly the need to reach the top every year, it just didn't
  add up and seemed like a fair amount of work.I believe solar is
  much more feasible for home installations. Also, I have seen wind
  turbine models similar to the size I was looking at, quite often
  they appear to not work and are just sitting there. Maybe there
  are better models, but I really think solar is just easier to
  deal with at a small scale.