GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-04) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Fish are eating lots of plastic
79 points by petethomas
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/the-bad-n...
___________________________________________________________________
 
sml156 - 2 hours ago
What's wrong with fish these days, They didn't do that when I was a
kid.
 
  saagarjha - 59 minutes ago
  That's because there wasn't as much plastic in the water for them
  to consume.
 
guskel - 5 hours ago
Maybe toxic fish could curb overfishing.
 
  QAPereo - 5 hours ago
  I've never felt better about having a lifelong dislike of fish.
 
pvaldes - 2 hours ago
And also cetaceans, sea-birds and turtles.
 
  fairpx - 2 hours ago
  I was watching a documentary, that proposed Humans do as well,
  since we end up consuming some of the fish that eat that stuff.
 
dev_throw - 4 hours ago
Bioaccumulation is a serious thing. I suspect increase of plastic
in fish might be related to the reduction in sperm count in
men.[0][1][0] https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bpa-semen-
quality... [1] http://www.deepseanews.com/2014/10/a-story-about-
fish-plasti...
 
  mjevans - 54 minutes ago
  'farmed' fish might also be a good option while we (as a species)
  work out our waste issues.
 
  acdanger - 4 hours ago
  You have a trailing * leading to a 404 on the second citation.
  Try this: http://www.deepseanews.com/2014/10/a-story-about-fish-
  plasti...
 
    dev_throw - 4 hours ago
    Thanks, I was having trouble with italicizing things :)
 
  PerfectElement - 1 hours ago
  Eating lower in the food chain is a practical and accessible
  solution.
 
    HillaryBriss - 54 minutes ago
    yeah. that's certainly been the approach for reducing exposure
    to mercury.but, with plastics, i wonder how significant the
    exposure reduction is for, say, consuming sardines, given that
    the plastic particles themselves may be mistaken for
    plankton.in other words, what percentage of a low food chain
    fish's or mollusk's diet is pure plastic?
 
  cropsieboss - 2 hours ago
  Do people really eat that much fish? I thought fish is mostly
  raised as fishmeal for cows. Making an even worse bioaccumulation
  chain.
 
    victornomad - 2 hours ago
    yes, people do. Not all the countries are pure meat eaters...
 
      Practicality - 2 hours ago
      You know that fish is a type of meat, right?
 
        Symmetry - 18 minutes ago
        Lots of cultures don't class fish in with most meats.  In
        traditional Catholicism the rule against meat on Fridays
        didn't apply to fish and likewise with Japanese Buddhist
        rules against meat eating.  It's sort of like how most
        people consider tomatoes to be vegetables even though they
        aren't, scientifically.Yeah, in 21st century English fish
        is a meat but it's non-centrally meat so the meaning is
        clear when you apply Gricean norms.
 
        o_____________o - 17 minutes ago
        I've found that "meat" is sometimes used in casual English
        as "Animal muscle/meat, but not fish"I think there's a
        slight conceptual divide on both the hard-carnivore-
        against-fish and pescatarian groups.Old world traditions
        tend to distinguish them separately as well.
 
      gnaritas - 1 hours ago
      > Not all the countries are pure meat eaters...lmao... fish
      is meat.
 
jxramos - 4 hours ago
I wish they would have provide a quantitative measure of something
about how much fish and how much plastic has been found to have
been eaten by marine life. Maybe it's in the link they give to
"enormous quantities of plastic trash", but it would be nice to
have a scale to the problem.
 
  acdanger - 4 hours ago
  Here is some research:
  https://wedocs.unep.org/rest/bitstreams/11700/retrievePage 93 has
  some specifics on recorded incidence of plastic ingestion among
  certain species.
 
carapace - 4 hours ago
I have a plan, but it's taking me a bit longer than I'd hoped:
http://phoenixbureau.github.io/ReGPGP/> The only way to clean up
such a huge mess is to create a system that mimics the way life
would do it. Really, if something could eat plastic there wouldn't
be quite such a bad problem. It is because no living creature can
digest plastic that it stays around and accumulates. So the
solution is to create a kind of artificial life that can eat the
plastic. Robots that replicate themselves, with a little bit of
manual assistance, and collect and convert the trash into forms
that can be used by living creatures.A little help?
 
  bsder - 2 hours ago
  That's called a bacterium.Why not create an actual bacterium to
  break plastic down like everything else in the environment?  It's
  not really that hard--high school students have done it
  before.http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-plastic-
  eati...Bonus points if you can make the bacterium specific to
  particular kinds of plastic.
 
    saagarjha - 58 minutes ago
    Well, you need to figure out an economically viable method of
    producing these bacteria in the quantities necessary and the
    perform research on the impact that these bacteria will have on
    the environment?
 
    avodonosov - 38 minutes ago
    Yes.One possible problem: if the bacteria also eat plastic in
    our useful devices, not yet garbadge.
 
  lend000 - 4 hours ago
  You could probably get it off the ground a lot faster if you lost
  the self-replicating requirement. (Self-replication / self
  organization is super cool and a research field of mine, but
  still a ways away from production).Just make a lot of them to
  start with and clean them up when/if they're done. Or make them
  biodegradable.
 
    carapace - 2 hours ago
    The swarm is self-replicating, not each individual bot.  (Have
    you ever read Alan Dean Foster's "Sentenced to Prism" (sic)?)
    The system is more like an ant nest.Self-replication is
    required to be able to make a lot of them in a reasonable
    amount of time.Once the bulk of the plastic has been
    sequestered excess robots will be glued together to make a
    floating island.There's no "done" state until/unless we stop
    throwing non-biodegradable matter into the Oceans.
 
userbinator - 36 minutes ago
I really wish plastics were recycled/reused a lot more, because
they are such ideal materials --- being rather unreactive,
flexible, resilient, and (in the case of thermoplastics, which make
up the bulk of this waste) easily reprocessed. Although the
throwaway culture and low cost means that a lot of it doesn't, I
wonder if in the future, if the prices go up in following petroleum
trends, "mining" for plastics would start becoming profitable and
recyling increase significantly.I also see some parallels with CFCs
--- another substance with some great properties, but which became
so common and cheap that we started to use them too carelessly and
caused a lot of environmental damage in the process. Hopefully,
this time we'll collectively realise, and plastics won't get banned
like that.
 
  Ninjalicious - 5 minutes ago
  I'm sort of banking on that. I expect our landfills will be mined
  by junkers. There is a lot of rare earth elements, metals, and
  plastics that won't biodegrade very quickly. Little snake bots
  tunneling through could pick them all up. It's all a matter of
  need, we'll deplete the finite resources soon.
 
harryf - 3 hours ago
Prediction: evolution will solve what humans are incapable of. That
means species of fish evolving that specializes in eating plastic.
Kinda makes sense. While plastic isn't bio-degradeable in the
normal sense, perhaps the digestive system of a specialized fish
will succeed. After all there is an abundance.
 
  sjg007 - 2 hours ago
  There are some microbe that breaks down plastic.  Maybe some sea
  life will form a symboitic relationship with with.
 
  lobster_johnson - 1 hours ago
  The evolutionary pressure to cause a mutated, plastic-eating fish
  to outcompete non-plastic-eating fish would suggest that there
  would be areas where plastic was more abundant that the other
  things (plankton, mostly) that fish normally feed on, i.e. other
  fish would be at a disadvantage because they couldn't process
  plastic. That's a pretty dire scenario for humans.
 
  Practicality - 1 hours ago
  Evolution was so last eon. We've got CRISPR now. :D
 
  yitchelle - 2 hours ago
  That's an interesting prediction. From what I can remember from a
  previous HN article, there is a bacterial that already eats
  plastics. How long would such a evolutionary step take place, I
  wonder?
 
    2muchcoffeeman - 35 minutes ago
    Not really. Evolution doesn't stop. And living things adapt to
    new circumstances all the time.
 
  lowglow - 2 hours ago
  Yes, the bigger worry is that evolution will solve humans, but
  thankfully nature is already working on a cure for
  plastics[0].[0] http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/chow-
  down-plastic-e...
 
acd - 24 minutes ago
We buy lots of cheap plastic made of carbon oil co2 emissions. Then
we throw the plastic waste into the oceans. Plastic has weak
estrogen hormone disturbance in them from BPA. Then we humans eat
the fish and thus gets the estrogen from BPA. This is bound to have
human reproduction issues down the
line.http://www.breastcancer.org/risk/factors/plastic
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bisphenol_A