GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-03) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
WhatsApp Cofounder on How It Reached 1.3B Users Without Losing Its
Focus
187 points by munchor
https://www.fastcompany.com/40459142/whatsapps-cofounder-on-how-...
___________________________________________________________________
 
cerealbad - 4 hours ago
icq, aim, msn messenger, google talk (DOA), skype, wechat. besides
widespread business adoption, what's special about this one? it's
seamless to uninstall an app and get a new one. why would there be
customer loyalty to this business model?ot, i don't understand why
anyone would want to get anywhere near mobile. people are too
stupid to use these internet devices in moderation and it will
destroy all social cohesion. it's a cash grab to the bottom as it
devolves into radical groupthink, a breakdown of dialogue, and mass
segregation of populations.how is arguing about anything and
everything productive or useful without domain specific expertise?
how is mindlessly consuming hours and hours of infotainment
benefiting anyone?but i can instantly communicate to anyone around
the world in a matter of milliseconds! your life is not that
interesting, a letter sent by post every other month would probably
be more fruitful to developing ideas, advancing discourse and
carefully articulating thoughts. it's like correspondence chess vs
1 minute bullet matches. one is excited screaming and shouting, the
other is a measured conversation and exchange. pretty sure e-mail
hit that sweet spot decades ago, with bulletin boards and irc
filling the less personal and more immediate gaps.
 
benevol - 10 hours ago
Which is cool in itself.What is deeply regrettable is the fact that
they ended up selling to Facebook and thereby contributing to
Facebook's aggressive and relentless mass surveillance system.
 
  inciampati - 9 hours ago
  I wonder if they also cut themselves a raw deal in selling. They
  could have built a whole platform on top of WhatsApp without any
  innovation more subtle than copying WeChat.
 
    charlesdm - 9 hours ago
    Nobody is going to complain about selling for $19bn. Sometimes
    you just need to take the money.
 
      njarboe - 7 hours ago
      And sometimes you don't. Zuckerburg famously had the chance
      to sell out for billions quite a few times [1], and basically
      said, "I'm doing what I want to be doing. If I sold out I
      would just start another social network company and I already
      own the best/biggest one."[1] http://www.businessinsider.com
      /all-the-companies-that-ever-t...edit: Closer and better
      quote. Thiel's paraphrase of Zuckerburg, "I don't know what I
      could do with the money. I'd just start another social
      networking site. I kind of like the one I already have."[2]
      https://www.inc.com/allison-fass/peter-thiel-mark-
      zuckerberg...
 
        eecks - 7 hours ago
        Did anyone offer him 19 billion?
 
          Mahn - 6 hours ago
          Are you suggesting they never had a chance to sell for 19
          billion? Because I'm pretty sure all Zuckerberg had to do
          was pick up the phone in 2009, or even earlier.
 
firefoxd - 4 hours ago
Here are some numbers i can't find. The number of users chatting on
yahoo, aim, facebook, msn messenger, and all the random others
combined when it was a thing not to care which people were using.At
my job in 2011, every single member of my team was on using a
different client, i was on ubuntu using Empathy.The point is, chat
was already resolved, and it didn't require some sort of "quiet
room or distraction free office" to get it where it was.Kudos to
the WhatsApp team for having this many users, but let's not forget
that we had no problem chatting until the facebook, yahoo, googles
broke the old protocol in favor of restricting users to their own
systems.
 
  blowski - 4 hours ago
  Talking with non-technical family members was hard in 2007.
  Partly this was because the most portable solution was a big
  chunky laptop and most people didn't even have that.  But we
  can't totally separate the mobile computing devices that have
  appeared since then from the apps installed on them. I'd love a
  world where open source protocols and clients dominated, but it
  wasn't quite the utopia you remember.
 
    frozenport - 3 hours ago
    Skype
 
      posguy - 38 minutes ago
      Total PITA to use, didn't work well on even decently spec'ed
      machines at the time, and required extra hardware that was of
      varying quality.
 
  enraged_camel - 2 hours ago
  WhatsApp didn't replace internet chatting. It replaced (or maybe
  I should say "disrupted") SMS, and perhaps more importantly, MMS.
  There are two reasons: it's free, and the UX is far superior in
  that it mimicks how humans, especially groups of humans,
  communicate.
 
    lou1306 - 2 hours ago
    Even though it was not free until some years ago, the price was
    so ridicolous that people were happy to pay for the service.
 
      fgonzag - 1 hours ago
      They never actually charged it though, you didn't actually
      have to pay it.
 
  stephengillie - 29 minutes ago
  > At my job in 2011, every single member of my team was on using
  a different client...This persists today - every single person I
  communicate with uses a completely different app, including SMS
  and email. I only know one person who uses WhatsApp, but serval
  have dumbphones.Coordinating with more than one person involves
  at least 2 chat programs and a website. "Group chats" are
  impossible because in 2017 we still can't group chat between 1
  person on Skype, 1 SMS, and a Facebook.
 
  avip - 2 hours ago
  We hear this rant on every chat-related thread. WhatsApp brought
  the amazing innovation of using your phone number for "login"
  (and later on - your native contacts as its contacts list). This
  enabled zero-BS onboarding, and that's why they have so many
  users. Thanks WA for helping humanity deprecate that horrible
  XMPP. I don't miss it.
 
    posguy - 1 hours ago
    WhatsApp mainly displaced SMS and MMS, some users of other chat
    protocols slowly migrated, but by and large WhatsApp mainly ate
    cellular carrier's lunch. Hence why most carriers offer
    unlimited calling and texting, discouraging use is just pushing
    their customers to these OTT apps.
 
mbesto - 10 hours ago
It's super easy to focus on a single metric (user growth) when you
have a seemingly unlimited amount of capital and have no immediate
pressure to turn _any_ revenue/profit. This article does a massive
disservice to those who are not as fortunate who will inevitably be
lead into failure.Note, this should not discredit the more
interesting and glorified aspects of WhatsApp (strong leadership,
technical aptitude, tech stack, etc).
 
  zeroxfe - 9 hours ago
  > It's super easy to focus on a single metric (user growth) when
  you have a seemingly unlimited amount of capitalWhere are you
  getting this from? Whatsapp was a very lean shop  _because_ they
  had very little capital to work with. Even after Sequoia came
  along, they sailed a tight ship.
 
  CyberDildonics - 10 hours ago
  > seemingly unlimited amount of capitalDid they burn through lots
  of money?> no immediate pressure to turn _any_
  revenue/profitDidn't some people pay for it?
 
    hobarrera - 48 minutes ago
    There's not option to pay for anything, so I couldn't pay even
    if I wanted to. IIRC, the registration screen even said it's be
    free forever.Given that they have extremely little metadata
    too, I actually wonder if they have any revenue stream.
 
    numbsafari - 9 hours ago
    They lost something close to $138MM the year before Facebook
    purchased them.https://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/dealbook/2014/1
    0/28/faceboo...
 
      senatorobama - 9 hours ago
      I'm a philistine, can someone explain how they paid their
      engineers when they lost SO much money?
 
        gordon_freeman - 6 hours ago
        I think if I remember correctly one of their main cost was
        paying a service like twilio (or something like that) to
        verify phone numbers of users when they registered to use
        whatsapp. Anybody has an idea if they are still outsourcing
        that verification part to a third party or doing in-house
        at Facebook?
 
        [deleted]
 
        tw04 - 9 hours ago
        They didn't lose SO MUCH MONEY, that's the thing.  The
        article link points that out.  They "lost" money on paper
        by handing out stock/equity to attract talent.  Their
        actual financials, while underwhelming, looked solid.
 
        1024core - 9 hours ago
        WhatsApp was a very lean shop (and, btw, mostly (all?)
        FreeBSD). At acquisition, IIRC, they had about 40 employees
        total (or maybe it was 40 engineers).
 
    tw04 - 9 hours ago
    They didn't burn through lots of money at all based on facebook
    financials.  And they charge $1/month for the app (although I
    don't think on all platforms).  I don't recall if it was + or
    -, but their "profitability" was less than $10 million in
    either direction so they weren't making or losing a ton.
 
      aetherson - 9 hours ago
      I've used WhatsApp for years and have never been charged a
      dime.
 
        Xunxi - 9 hours ago
        it doesn't rule out the fact that there was an annual
        subscription fee at some point in
        time.https://blog.whatsapp.com/615/Making-WhatsApp-free-
        and-more-...
 
        wpietri - 8 hours ago
        It varied by country. Some places it was $1 for the app.
        Other places, $1/year. Other places, free entirely. My
        guess is their goal was to make enough money to keep in the
        black, but to otherwise not worry too much about revenue.
        That let them maximize growth while avoiding the headaches
        and dilution of raising money.
 
        tw04 - 8 hours ago
        I'm not sure what to tell you, I'm not fabricating the fact
        there was very much a yearly subscription fee associated
        with the app (and prior to that a price to just download
        the app).  I'm aware it didn't apply universally which is
        why I specifically said it varied depending on
        platform.https://www.imore.com/whatsapp-moves-yearly-
        subscription-pay...
 
          signal11 - 7 hours ago
          I have an iTunes receipt from 2013 for 69p paid for a
          year's worth of Whatsapp service. Their message then was
          "we charge because we don't want to show you ads".IIRC
          they were always free in emerging markets like India
          though.
 
          aetherson - 8 hours ago
          Well, you claimed in the post I responded to a monthly
          subscription, not an annual one.  What's a factor of
          twelve between friends?My understanding is that the
          annual fee was essentially nonexistent, honored far more
          on the breach than in the observance, though all I know
          for sure is that they never charged me.
 
          coldtea - 7 hours ago
          Or one might have not even noticed it. Just a click
          somewhere in a dialog, end of story. Among 10,000 other
          events we go through everyday...
 
          tw04 - 4 hours ago
          Not sure why I typed /month, it was always a yearly fee
          or a flat fee to buy the app.  Can't edit it at this
          point.
 
  wpietri - 8 hours ago
  Did you read the article? They're explicitly not focusing on user
  growth:"But while Facebook has long prided itself on the way its
  growth team has turned attracting new members into a science,
  Koum is equally proud of the fact that WhatsApp has not done so.
  Instead, all of its attention has gone into making the app as
  simple as possible to get started with?it doesn?t even require
  you to create a user name or password?and so useful that you?ll
  tell friends and family about it."And that's consistent with what
  I've read of their pre-FB approach. During that period, they
  definitely didn't have an unlimited amount of capital. They got
  to 250m users (as of June 2013) [1] on only $8.3 million [2].So
  no, I don't think this does a disservice. Especially when you
  compare it with things like Juicero, which rode a wave of hype
  into a $120m failure (14.5x what WhatsApp spent). Hype can get
  you money, but unless you focus intensely on user experience and
  user value you won't build the audience you need to succeed.[1]
  https://www.statista.com/chart/2614/monthly-active-
  whatsapp-...[2] https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/whatsapp
  /funding-rou...
 
    dingaling - 8 hours ago
    You are quite correct, and indeed they surrendered a
    considerable number of potential users by refusing to make
    their app easily usable on a tablet or other SIM-less
    device.Which is a very interesting and rare example of
    prioritising one aspect of UX by completely sacrificing
    another.
 
    mbesto - 6 hours ago
    > Did you read the article?I did.> as simple as possible to get
    started withHow is that not applying a focus on "user growth"?
    Just because you're not "growth hacking" or "using a a growth
    team" doesn't mean you are not implementing a strategy of
    growth of a user base. Adding a paywall or an advertisement
    would actively thwart the "simplicity of getting started", and
    thus halt user growth. My point still stands - most businesses
    who didn't have the type of capital backing that WhatsApp has
    would be insolvent or have to actively cause friction in their
    sign-up process to remain solvent (and hence halt user
    growth).> Especially when you compare it with things like
    Juicero, which rode a wave of hype into a $120m failureNo one
    was comparing it to Juicero...I have no idea how that's in any
    way relevant...
 
      ramses0 - 5 hours ago
      Please understand some of the details about _HOW_ WhatsApp
      did what they did.Focusing on reach (ubiquity is an
      innovation).  Focusing on operational efficiency (a low-cost
      tech company is an innovation).The apocryphal stories about
      WhatsApp in support of the two above points are:1) Supporting
      J2ME clients (ie: dumb-phones) ... connecting "poor people"
      in dumb-phone countries w/ "rich people" in smart-phone
      countries (for $0.99 app).$0.99 / user * 25% of your userbase
      isn't enough revenue for most companies to be successful.2)
      Be operationally efficient, reliable, and lean.  How?  By
      running like 10 erlang servers (targeting peak message
      transmission RATES, not all-time storage of messages or
      number of users)This allowed them to _SCALE_ revenue because
      they're basically dividing by zero (Income v. Expenses) if
      they're extremely lean on number of employees, maintenance,
      and operations costs.Therefore: it compares extremely well to
      Juicero as a counter-example.
 
    CharlesW - 6 hours ago
    > Did you read the article? They're explicitly not* focusing on
    user growth:*I also RTFA, and it's hard to understand how
    someone could think user growth wasn't the focus.? "?all of its
    attention has gone into making the app as simple as possible to
    get started with?" [Hint: They did this to improve virality.]?
    "All along, he adds, the company's goal has been 'getting every
    single smartphone user on our network and getting them to use
    WhatsApp.'"Plus, they'd said as much elsewhere as well. From
    https://www.wired.com/2016/01/whatsapp-is-
    nearing-a-billion-...:? "Continued growth, it turns out, was
    one of the main reasons Koum agreed to the Facebook
    acquisition. The deal allowed WhatsApp to concentrate on growth
    without worrying too much about revenue."
 
      wpietri - 2 hours ago
      To me there's a giant difference between people focused on
      growth for the sake of growth and people trying to make a
      valuable product that is then rewarded with growth.As an
      example, look at Google in the early days. They were mainly
      focused on making a great, valuable product. Growth was a
      consequence of that. In contrast, look at all the people that
      glued gamification, growth hacking, etc, onto mediocre
      mediocre products. As with things like MLMs, a growth-first
      focus can get business results, but I think it's a very
      different mindset than, "Let's make a product people
      love."Growth is surely a useful metric for them, and from
      that quote, it looks like it's a goal. But a goal is
      different, broader thing than what one focuses on. Compare
      people who want to be, say, great athletes (and therefore
      famous) with people who just want to be famous. The former
      will focus on doing the hard work; the latter will be more
      inclined to chase self-promotion and attention directly.
 
  [deleted]
 
  maqbool - 9 hours ago
  tech stack : Erlang
 
    rdtsc - 7 hours ago
    Here is the description of their stack and how Erlang helped
    them by Rick Reed at Erlang
    Factory:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c12cYAUTXXsHere is
    Jamshid Mahdavi talking about their stack as well but focusing
    on development, testing and shipping code. Some of the stuff
    they do will surprise you if you've been at a shop with a large
    QA team and deployment pipelines with many
    stages.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tW49z8HqsNw
 
    zerr - 4 hours ago
    Modified Erlang, as described in one of their talks.
 
philliphaydon - 10 hours ago
The messaging app no one uses in Asia?
 
  Jagat - 10 hours ago
  Are you serious? Everyone and their grandma in India uses
  WhatsApp. It's so pervasive that it's almost like the only means
  of communication for people with smartphone and internet access.
 
    holydude - 9 hours ago
    I guess he meant wechat/qq,kakao and line that are dominant in
    other countries. Whatsapp is impressive though.
 
    bernadus_edwin - 9 hours ago
    Whatsapp is no 1 market share in every country. If not no 1,
    only lost from wechat
 
      freddie_mercury - 9 hours ago
      WhatsApp is #1 in 55% of countries. It loses out to Zalo,
      Line, imo, Facebook Messenger and Blackberry Messenger in
      various countries.I'm pretty sure you made up every claim you
      just wrote. Why would you bother doing that?
 
        kinkrtyavimoodh - 7 hours ago
        Think he meant within Asia
 
          freddie_mercury - 7 hours ago
          It's not true within Asia, either. Japan, Vietnam, Korea,
          Malaysia...WhatsApp isn't #1 is any of those places and
          neither is WeChat.
 
        [deleted]
 
      ddeck - 9 hours ago
      While I agree that Whatsapp is the dominant chat app in Asia,
      it's not number 1 everywhere.Notably - as you mentioned -
      Wechat in China, but also Kakao in Korea, Zalo in Vietnam and
      Line in Japan and Taiwan, where very few people use Whatsapp.
 
        robjan - 8 hours ago
        In my experience, most people in Taiwan use both Whatsapp
        and Line
 
      skinnymuch - 9 hours ago
      WhatsApp user base is insanely impressive but it isn't even
      no 1 in the country Ycombinator is based in. FBM is. Then it
      also isn't no 1 in obvious countries like Korea Japan China
      Taiwan Vietnam.
 
  coldtea - 7 hours ago
  First of all, hundreds of millions of people use it IN Asia
  too.Second, even if they didn't, with 1.3B users it's as large or
  larger than any other competitor app globally.Third, they got 16B
  for it, while spending like $10 million to make it.So I don't get
  where the sneer comes from.Even if the statement wasn't false,
  it's not as if use in Asia is the be all end all of success?
 
  robjan - 8 hours ago
  I live in Hong Kong and close enough to 100% of people use
  WhatsApp. Most businesses display their WhatApp numbers in their
  flyers/billboards. Also; every company, sports club, social group
  has a massive WhatsApp group which they use to keep people
  updated. It can be quite annoying, to be honest, because everyone
  is always constantly WhatsApping these groups at every social
  gathering.
 
  [deleted]
 
rvr_ - 3 hours ago
WhatsApp's success here in Brazil can be attributed to very few
reasons: 1) Worked in every single smartphone (I started using it
on a very resource constrained 2010's Nokia running s60) 2) SMS was
and still is very expensive here. 3) Zero friction to use: it uses
your phone number as your ID and your catalog list as its own.It
was a killer combination, almost everybody here in Brazil uses it,
no matter how young or how old, no matter if it is a rich kid with
the latest IPhone or the poor with the cheapest phone. Even the
telcos had to bend to WhatsApp strength by offering "unlimited
WhatsApp usage" on very limited data plans.
 
  smeroth - 2 hours ago
  Regarding its availability, I think it's sad that they dropped
  support for Symbian OS. I wonder what made them drop an existing
  platform - I would've understood not bothering to develop for a
  new one, but not drop an existing.
 
  mattbettinson - 26 minutes ago
  I was in Brazil during the WhatsApp ban last summer. It crippled
  communication, it was fascinating to see.
 
  std_throwaway - 2 hours ago
  Did many switch to Telegram in the last year?
 
fwdpropaganda - 6 hours ago
I think they're losing focus.I've started seeing cracks in
WhatsApp's UI:- Some times when inserting a single emoji on a
single line, in between pressing send and the message being sent,
the keyboard flickers.- There seems to be a mysterious space
between the Euro symbol and the next character...? That space isn't
displayed on the webapp.- I had a third one that I forgot.Also bad
decisions:- Logs shouldn't be backed-up to Google Drive.- Bloat.
"Status"? No one cares. Why does swiping left allows me to take
pictures? I have a camera app that I like using.- Sharing metadata
with Facebook will be WhatsApp's undoing, mark my words.Signal on
the other hand is being developed by 1 guy and has 5M installs.
 
  drawnwren - 4 hours ago
  The social aspects are huge in Asia. How important is it that you
  can send an audio message instead of text to you? Again, probably
  not at all. In China, it was the single differentiating feature
  that led to Wechat's rise. My preferences does not integrate into
  our preferences.
 
  482794793792894 - 4 hours ago
  WhatsApp's UI is a complete mess. Trying to explain it to my mum
  has been near-impossible.Starting a new conversation is done with
  an unlabeled FAB on the main-screen. She had no idea that that
  was even a button.Then there's four tabs across the top. One for
  taking pictures, because the Camera-App and the camera-shortcut
  in the conversation view apparently weren't enough, one for
  actual chats, one for setting your status, because that's clearly
  a similar action to chatting and should therefore be placed in a
  tab next to it, and one for calls, no idea why that's not just a
  button in the contacts list.Then when you go into the
  conversation view, at the bottom you have a generic attach media
  icon, a take-picture-and-send-it-shortcut and then separate from
  that the send-voice-message button, sharing its place with the
  actual send-message button. That might've been clever design at
  some point in the past, but now you have those other buttons
  right next to the send-voice-message button, so it should share
  the look with those as it does a very similar thing.Also, the
  unlabeled movie-camera-icon at the top does not mean sending a
  video, it means starting a video call. You could sort of guess
  that by the location of that button, but that's still not just
  obvious, especially not for my mum.Where you can however now send
  videos from, is the Emoji-selector. Or well, it's rather GIFs.
  Reaction-GIFs, even. Which is why I'm not completely opposed to
  them having placed it there instead of in the attach-media-
  dialog, but now you have 9 tabs at the top of the Emoji-selector
  and three tabs at the bottom (also including the search), as well
  as a delete-key, which does not behave like a tab. And two of
  these tabs even share the same icon.Moving on, when you mark a
  message for selection, you get 5 icons at the top. Two of those
  are the exact same arrow-icon just mirrored. One means "Reply",
  the other means "Forward". Even knowing that there's a
  difference, I couldn't tell you which one means which without
  first long-pressing on them, which my mum won't know to do.Also,
  one of those 5 icons is a star and when you long-press on it, it
  literally says "Star". Not "Favourite", not "Remind me", not
  "Mark as Important". I don't even know what it does myself, so I
  can't tell you what it should say there.Some of these problems
  are hard to avoid or hard to get right, but many of these are
  there, because they absolutely did not focus on being a chat
  application and instead had to turn the whole thing into
  everything and the kitchen sink, and then they're even making the
  individual features compete for a spot in the directly visible
  GUI, no matter how much it clutters things up, just because they
  want people to use them.
 
  helloindia - 6 hours ago
  And Stories, what was he thinking?
 
    LambdaComplex - 3 minutes ago
    Oh, that's an easy one. They want to get some of Snapchat's
    market share.
 
  hiq - 5 hours ago
  > Sharing metadata with Facebook will be WhatsApp's undoing, mark
  my words.It pains me to say this, but almost nobody cares. Many
  people don't even know that Facebook owns WhatsApp. Most people
  don't care about how privacy-intrusive Messenger (or whatever
  Facebook's chat app is called nowadays) is, and WhatsApp is less
  intrusive than that (at least the data is e2e encrypted). I don't
  see any undoing in sight, unless the competition steps its game
  up a whole lot.
 
    newscracker - 4 hours ago
    >  I don't see any undoing in sight, unless the competition
    steps its game up a whole lot.Due to network effects,
    competitors can't really have a big impact on reducing WhatsApp
    usage unless something scandalous and hugely worrisome (to the
    general public) happens with WhatsApp, which then causes many
    people to ditch it.I don't use WhatsApp because it's owned by
    Facebook. So my following comments here should be taken with a
    pinch of salt. Telegram, which I do use, has been on a rapid
    pace of development for at least a few years now. If I had to
    guess, I'd say that Telegram likely provides a much faster,
    better and richer experience compared to WhatsApp. Just a few
    features that come to my mind on Telegram that I like and value
    - username (no need to reveal one's phone number to others),
    @replies to tag users, cross platform/OS and cross device sync,
    great search (global as well as within a conversation), and
    message editing and deletion after sending. Telegram also has
    bots, money transfer and other features. I'm aware of the
    comparative security related weaknesses in Telegram, but other
    ones (like Signal and Wire, more so Signal) that are better on
    the security front have a long way to go to catch up with
    Telegram on reliability, features and UX.
 
  skore - 5 hours ago
  > "Status"? No one cares.I really didn't care either. Then we
  went on a family vacation and instead of sending pictures to
  everybody all the time, I put a couple on my status every other
  day and told people if they're interested, they can look there.I
  must admit it was a fun experience watching people check them out
  (you can see who looks at your status) and a few fun
  conversations started through it. Definitely a better option than
  firehose blasting everybody with your vacation pictures directly.
  (Hardly anybody in even my extended family uses facebook, btw.)As
  for swiping left: That's just the alternative mode for tab
  switching, swiping right gets you to "status". I agree that it
  doesn't need a camera tab, though.
 
  ramses0 - 4 hours ago
  Stories + Camera + Pictures is all Zuck. (Global Facebook theme:
  "Take pictures, tell stories, connect with real
  people.")Otherwise the comm's platform will just degenerate into
  shitposting, memes, and politics.  Make it easier / more natural
  to share "real" pictures, not meme-y text.You'll see it
  "universally" in all their apps... each done slightly differently
  to account for differing user-base habits, but the core idea is
  the same... suck oxygen from competitors, and push forward with
  tools for OC and not reposts (original content, aka: real-user-
  sharing).
 
leog7 - 4 hours ago
How much profit increase does a new user bring can i see that?
 
ikeyany - 10 hours ago
Why do we adhere to the assumption that number of users is the
ultimate metric of software success?I would like to hear from devs
who aren't interested in expanding for the sake of expanding, who
still consider their apps to be very successful.
 
  QML - 1 hours ago
  Anytime you have a network, the value is said to be proportional
  to the square of the number of connected users. This is known as
  Metcalfe's Law. Is it just another vanity measure? I have no
  clue.[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metcalfe%27s_law
 
  uselessbro - 3 hours ago
  Software success is different for the medium you are in B2B or
  B2C and then also the market. Chat market is pretty crowded so
  you're going for quantity.If I have a B2B tool and it's fairly
  niche I might only need 100-200 clients but I charge them more :)
 
  majani - 3 hours ago
  Go to Indie Hackers or Basecamp SVN for such material.
 
  bsbechtel - 9 hours ago
  You should read Basecamp's material then.
 
  kemiller - 9 hours ago
  For a messenging app, with classic network effects, it?s a very
  relevant metric.
 
    ikeyany - 9 hours ago
    That is true. Even outside of messaging apps, I very frequently
    see maximum growth as an inherently optimal metric to shoot
    for.
 
    amelius - 3 hours ago
    With the network effect, if you are above a certain threshold
    then suddenly everybody will use your app. So the number of
    users is either low, or it is near the maximum number of users.
    This means that there is little information in the actual
    number of users.
 
  rasz - 8 hours ago
  Because users are the product you sell.
 
pmontra - 8 hours ago
> all of its attention has gone into making the app as simple as
possible to get started withAnd they succeeded. I've been using it
for years and the only new feature I remember is end to end
encryption, despite they probably added new features. I don't care
about status and stories, if they're still there they managed not
to make them in the way of people that only want a SMS alternative.
This is great design.My only wish is that they stay using the very
same chatbot backend of Messenger. WhatsApp is the only major chart
platform without chatbots and given it's the number one in many
countries, included mine, I'm a little tired to tell customers, yes
but your customers will have to use Messenger or Telegram (which
many people don't even know to exist.)
 
  krrrh - 1 hours ago
  The other significant feature added was voice chats. The fact
  that it's easy to forget or not notice is a strong indicator of
  how much humanity has adopted text chatting as the primary mode
  of remote communication.
 
    jacalata - 1 hours ago
    "Humanity" may be overstating it. In Brazil people very
    commonly use WhatsApp to send short spoken messages, for
    instance.
 
gumby - 6 hours ago
> ?Images tell a much better story than text,? he says. ?And videos
tell a much better story than images.Seems like the evidence of
WhatsApp itself, not to mention my own experience, is directly
contradictory to this.A video is rarely preferable to an image, and
an image is rarely preferable to a bit of text.
 
ransom1538 - 9 hours ago
I think i see a pattern:WhatsApp: circumvent cellphone texting
chargesAirbnb: circumvent hotel lawsUber: circumvent taxi
lawsAmazon: circumvent state taxesFacebook: circumvent people's
anonymity onlineGoogle: circumvent copyrights (take people's
content slap on ads)
 
  pjc50 - 8 hours ago
  Of those description, whatsapp is the one that's actually the
  classic "how capitalism is supposed to work": provide a
  comparable or better service for a lower price.Amazon's era of
  sales tax evasion is mostly over. And if anyone is monetising
  copyright infringement it's not Google (who are somewhat
  conscientious about this after some lawsuits) but Tumblr
  (literally made of copyright infringing photos)
 
    kevin_thibedeau - 7 hours ago
    You mean the Sears-Roebuck era of tax evasion.
 
      pjc50 - 6 hours ago
      I meant something very specific:
      https://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/24/the-holiday-is-over-
      amazon-w...(The era of Amazon posting things from Jersey to
      UK and other destinations for similar reasons ended ages
      ago)I was also restricting myself to the question of sales
      taxes; tax evasion/avoidance among the internet tech
      monoliths is a wider question.
 
  bwb - 9 hours ago
  I do not see it, i just see huge value to society with each.
 
    wpietri - 8 hours ago
    As an aside, "I don't see X, therefore X is
    irrelevant/meaningless" is an argument whose relevance hinges
    on the speaker being all-seeing, all-knowing. That's always
    seemed an odd take to me. When somebody sees something that I
    don't, my goal is to see it.
 
  tedunangst - 9 hours ago
  One of those is not like the others.
 
  zeroxfe - 9 hours ago
  Or less cynically:WhatsApp: cheap plentiful messagingAirbnb:
  cheap plentiful vacation rentalsUber: cheap plentiful
  taxisAmazon: cheap plentiful stuffFacebook: ... umm i'm sure
  there's something here ...Google: cheap plentiful access to
  informationAll of these disrupt the slow-moving complacent
  dinosaurs of the past.
 
    hobarrera - 45 minutes ago
    It's funny that facebook is amongst the biggest on that list,
    when they don't actually seem to provide anything of use to the
    end user.
 
    wpietri - 8 hours ago
    And one of the interesting questions for me is "where does
    'cheap' come from"?In the case of WhatsApp, it came from telco
    monopolies overcharging for a particular use of data. I'm
    certainly ok with that.And I was initially excited about
    Airbnb, rideshare, etc, because some of the cheap comes from
    finding underutilized resources (an apartment that happened to
    be empty for a few weeks, people who were going somewhere
    anyhow) and putting them to work.But I find the second-order
    effects fascinating. Certainly some of Airbnb and Uber's
    cheapness comes from dodging regulation and shifting costs onto
    other people."Privatize the gains, socialize the losses" is
    undeniably a lucrative business strategy, but it's not one I
    particularly want to celebrate.
 
      wyager - 8 hours ago
      > "Privatize the gains, socialize the losses" is undeniably a
      lucrative business strategy, but it's not one I particularly
      want to celebrate.This doesn't describe anything that AirBnB
      or Uber are doing.Taxis were expensive and horrible because
      governments created artificial scarcity via taxi medallion
      systems. They were "socializing the gains", to build off your
      aphorism.Uber re-privatized the gains by circumventing this
      ridiculous system, and we're all much better for
      it."Socializing the losses" refers to groups getting bailed
      out on taxpayer dime when they fail, and nothing even
      resembling that has happened with AirBnB or Uber.
 
        quadrige - 8 hours ago
        Airbnb socializes the costs by transfering them to the flat
        owners (cleaning etc.), and Uber to the drivers (fuel,
        maintenance etc.)
 
          wyager - 43 minutes ago
          That's not what socializing means. Socializing means
          using government to redistribute costs to the population
          at large via taxes. Entering a voluntary private
          agreement where you have some obligations is not
          "socialization".
 
          krrrh - 1 hours ago
          In terms of Airbnb socializing costs, it's not the flat
          owner who is taking on some costs and some profit, but
          their neighbours, who bear the costs of noise and reduced
          security and community.
 
        coldtea - 7 hours ago
        >Uber re-privatized the gains by circumventing this
        ridiculous system, and we're all much better for it.Who are
        those all? Taxi drivers or the general public? I'd rather
        have professional, decently paid, taxi drivers instead of
        amateur hour weekend drivers making minimum wage at the
        expense of yet another working class job.
 
          chrisco255 - 6 hours ago
          Yeah same in the US. Honestly there was an under supply
          of cabs. The cars themselves were all uniform and weren't
          very clean. Cabbie drivers weren't very well paid ever.
          It was often difficult to pay with a credit or debit
          card...Uber and Lyft put so much competitive pressure on
          the system that cabs are nicer now.
 
          iamd3vil - 7 hours ago
          Actually in India, I am really grateful for Uber.
          Previously talking to an auto rikshaw or taxi is pretty
          painful. They are rude, not reliable, charge a lot if you
          don't know the city or area. Also atleast from my talking
          to lot of Uber/Ola drivers is that they are earning a lot
          compared to their previous taxi service. So to answer
          your question, both drivers and public.
 
          devdas - 4 hours ago
          Earning more isn't very true now though.
 
          wyager - 6 hours ago
          Did you ever use a taxi before uber? Nothing you said is
          grounded in reality. Taxi drivers are usually extremely
          unprofessional, underpaid, and horrific drivers. It's
          actually gotten much better since Uber came around.
 
          coldtea - 5 hours ago
          >Did you ever use a taxi before uber?Almost every day.
 
          pjc50 - 5 hours ago
          People really need to specify a geographical context for
          discussions of Uber; I've no doubt that wyager and
          coldtea are both reporting their experiences, but taxis
          are necessarily a very local service. Clearly some cities
          just have really bad taxis.
 
          twic - 4 hours ago
          Finally, sense!In London, Uber is a taxi service. The
          people driving for Uber are taxi drivers, with taxi
          driver licenses [1], and the vehicles they drive are
          taxis, with taxi licenses [2]. The experience is
          therefore much the same. The difference arises from three
          things: Uber has a nice app, whereas legacy taxi offices
          are a shambles; Uber drivers are desperate to keep their
          star rating up, and so might be nicer; Uber subsidises
          the whole operation to win market share. The app is the
          only significant difference, in my experience.[1]
          https://tfl.gov.uk/info-for/taxis-and-private-
          hire/licensing...[2] https://tfl.gov.uk/info-for/taxis-
          and-private-hire/licensing...
 
        wpietri - 8 hours ago
        Taxis were mostly horrible because of pre-mobile-phone
        dispatch systems and expectations. That would have gotten
        fixed with or without Uber, although Uber certainly did
        push it along.But taxi medallion systems served a number of
        purposes. One of the big ones is reasonable regulation of
        taxi and driver quality. Another was keeping supply and
        demand balanced at a level where people didn't have to cut
        corners on things like taxi maintenance just to survive,
        which helped keep taxi fleets safe. A third was setting up
        a reasonably livable wage for career taxi drivers. A
        fourth, at least in some cities, was creating a de-facto
        retirement system: since drivers had dibs on medallions,
        they could invest and create an asset that would fund their
        retirement. A fifth was creating a revenue stream for
        cities to that helps pay for regulatory and road costs.
        Those are off the top of my head; I'm sure there were
        more.Now instead a lot of those costs are borne by other
        people. Uber has shifted capital and maintenance costs
        entirely away from cab companies and on to random people
        desperate enough to drive for Uber. Losses are no longer
        the problem of the cab company, but individuals. When those
        drivers go bankrupt, society bears the costs. When those
        drives use public assistance [1], society bears the costs.
        When they retire and we make up for their lost retirement
        savings, society bears the costs. And that's to say nothing
        of the direct and indirect societal costs that come from
        more traffic.Similar issues come up with Airbnb. E.g., if
        you thought you were living next to a neighbor and now are
        dealing with an illegal one-unit hotel in your building,
        you are experiencing a loss. If the apartment you rent out
        is trashed because somebody is running an illegal business
        out of it [2], you experience significant loss. When rent
        goes up because people are illegally converting housing to
        de-facto hotel stock, that is a socialized loss with
        privatized gains.I'm not even saying this is necessarily
        worse. As with the bankruptcy system as a whole, it can
        sometimes be overall better for society to pay for
        something. But we shouldn't sweep this stuff under the
        rug.[1] E.g., https://uberpeople.net/threads/you-may-
        qualify-for-governmen...[2] https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/01
        /airbnb-nightmare-homeowners-...
 
          wyager - 6 hours ago
          > One of the big ones is reasonable regulation of taxi
          and driver quality.I can only imagine that someone who
          rarely or never travels would say something like this.
          The main reason I switched to uber is that taxis are
          universally horrible, both in terms of drivers and
          vehicles. It's gotten much better since uber forced them
          to compete, but they still generally suck.So maybe you're
          right, and that was the reason for taxi medallions; but
          guess what? It didn't work.> Uber has shifted capital and
          maintenance costs entirely away from cab companies and on
          to random people desperate enough to drive for
          Uber.Again, this is something that I can't imagine
          hearing from someone who actually uses Ubers on a regular
          basis. Most Uber drivers I've talked to love the
          platform, and a good portion of them are e.g. students
          working a side job, none of them "desperate" people.
 
          wpietri - 3 hours ago
          It is frustrating that you ignore the meat of what I
          wrote, pick on a couple of things you can object to, and
          carry on carping. I'll try one more reply and see how it
          goes.> I can only imagine that someone who rarely or
          never travels would say something like this.Your
          imagination is poor. I've lived on 4 continents and am on
          an extended trip even as I write this.We're talking about
          different kinds of regulation. You apparently care about
          things being shiny; most regulation, though, is about
          setting a minimum bar.In the early, high-growth days of
          something, regulation is rarely useful because
          everybody's on their best behavior. It becomes more
          important when things settle down into a relatively
          steady state. Then, the incentive to shave nickels and
          dimes can come out elsewhere. E.g., taxis face
          significant safety inspections and maintenance
          requirements because when you use a car as a commercial
          vehicle, you put a lot more miles on it and you are more
          likely face safety issues.We don't yet see these problems
          with UberX because it has only been going for a few
          years, and because Uber has a strong incentive to keep
          from becoming an obvious disaster until growth slows and
          revenue gains come more from exploiting their market
          position.> Most Uber drivers I've talked to love the
          platformGosh, might they have some incentive to only say
          happy things to you? Gosh, might there be some selection
          bias in your sample? Gosh, might people not talk about
          their pain and fears to random strangers?
 
  [deleted]
 
  hn_throwaway_99 - 8 hours ago
  Your list is preposterous. Even if you take all your other items
  at face value, you make it sound like "circumventing cellphone
  texting charges" is breaking the law or something, as if
  ridiculous texting charges are set up for the good of anyone
  besides big telcos.
 
    fwdpropaganda - 6 hours ago
    It's not preposterous, it's exactly right. SMS text messages
    were a something like $15bn industry before whatsapp got
    between them and the customers, and that has value.
 
      hammock - 6 hours ago
      What about imessage?
 
        helloindia - 5 hours ago
        Only on iOS. Doesn't have the same impact as WhatsApp.
 
  wyager - 8 hours ago
  You can't just slap the word "circumvent" onto a bunch of vastly
  different concepts and expect us to believe they are all similar.
 
7ewis - 6 hours ago
Sorry but I don't agree with the statistic of the Status feature.>
the company announced that 250 million people?a quarter of all
members?were using it dailyJust had a quick look, and I have around
150 contacts on WhatsApp (mainly the Snapchat/Instagram users age
group) and not a single person has set one of these photo statuses
right now. I only ever recall seeing one once, since the feature
launched.If I open up Snapchat/Instagram I will literally see
hundreds. Unless it's become very popular within a certain country,
or another age group I find it hard to believe that it's reached
anywhere near the size of Snapchat's user base.
 
  fat-chunk - 6 hours ago
  Are you in the States? I have heard that Whatsapp is much more
  popular outside the US.I live in the UK and everyone I know uses
  Whatsapp as their main method of communication while Snapchat
  activity seems to have dropped very quickly, perhaps in favour of
  Instagram, in my experience anyway.