GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-09-03) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Wells Fargo uncovers up to 1.4M more fake accounts
132 points by cinquemb
http://money.cnn.com/2017/08/31/investing/wells-fargo-fake-accou...
___________________________________________________________________
 
QAPereo - 7 hours ago
 If this were a crime being committed by an individual on the same
scale, what could that person expect to receive for a sentence? I
really don't know the answer to that and I'm curious, but I
strongly suspect that fines wouldn't be in it and it would be more
of a custodial sentence.
 
  [deleted]
 
    rectang - 7 hours ago
    Indeed.  The individual actors within WF responsible made out 7
    figures ahead (Tolstedt) or 8 figures ahead (Stumpf).  There
    are not adequate disincentives for either the corporation or
    those within it to discourage such behavior.
 
      stephengillie - 53 minutes ago
      Courts should have the legal power to "dissolve" a company,
      and this should be mandatory for some crimes. Workers would
      scrutinize a company's history a lot more closely if it were
      possible for their job to be dissolved for someone else's
      illegal activity.Or maybe that creates too much risk for the
      average person to accept.
 
  asmithmd1 - 7 hours ago
  Wells Fargo claims it isn't the leadership - it is just a few
  thousand bad apple low-level employees and they have been
  fired.http://money.cnn.com/2016/09/08/investing/wells-fargo-
  create...
 
    maxxxxx - 3 hours ago
    I see that in medical too. You have plenty of SOPs but
    management tightens deadlines to the point that it's obvious
    that you have to take shortcuts to meet them. Management then
    can point then to the SOP but in reality they created the
    conditions for non-compliance.
 
    will_brown - 6 hours ago
    That's not far off from Uber's corporate PR.  After all Uber is
    only taking requests from riders, connecting riders to drivers,
    and processing payment for the entire transaction...really Uber
    is just a tech company, it's the drivers illegally operating as
    unlicensed taxis/rides for hire.Some Uber drivers literally
    have criminal records for driving for Uber, Uber even recruited
    and paid bonuses for drivers to unknowingly leave counties
    where they were operating legally to counties they were
    violating the law, think anyone from Uber corporate is going to
    jail anytime soon?
 
      icebraining - 4 hours ago
      Some Uber drivers literally have criminal records for driving
      for UberWhere?
 
    rectang - 7 hours ago
    If you design a system that makes it inevitable that people
    will misbehave, you own their misbehavior.
 
      [deleted]
 
      trgv - 7 hours ago
      Morally perhaps, but not legally.It's sad really.  It seems
      to me that the whole Wells Fargo scandal is ultimately a
      lesson about how this company abused their employees and set
      them impossible tasks like "each customer should have X
      credit cards and Y accounts."But that's not what people seem
      to have taken from it.  Instead, the whole incident has been
      presented as "just another big bank defrauding its
      customers."  In reality though, the goal of the fraud was not
      to enrich anyone, it was just for these employees to keep
      their jobs.It feels like this whole incident could have
      spurred a conversation about the toxicity of these kind of
      unrealistic sales goals that provide no benefit to the
      customer, but it didn't.
 
        QAPereo - 7 hours ago
        The goal was to enrich a smaller number of people higher up
        the chain than the employees who actually committed the
        fraud.  Your argument also is a strong case for why
        leadership is almost certainly to blame, since they are the
        only ones who were enriched or helped at all.
 
    QAPereo - 7 hours ago
    If I hired thousands of people who under my supervision
    committed millions of crimes I would expect to be held
    accountable.  Furthermore questions of fact such as Wells
    Fargo's claims are the kind of thing you expect to be settled
    in a court or least a pretrial hearing.
 
    fossuser - 6 hours ago
    I find it interesting when organizations use the 'few bad
    apples'analogy for this kind of thing.The full statement is 'A
    few bad apples spoil the barrel' - which comes from the concept
    that a rotting apple lets off ethylene gas which will cause the
    apples surrounding it to also turn.This is probably a better
    analogy than intended for the companies that incorrectly use it
    since bad behavior spreads like a corrupting influence through
    an organization and fixing it would really require larger
    changes than just getting rid of a couple people.
 
      SomeStupidPoint - 3 hours ago
      There's also the delightful expression: "A fish rots from the
      head down."I'm deeply skeptical of the claim that you can
      have a few thousand instances of "rot" without there being
      somewhere higher in the company it's being spread from. If 1%
      of the company is "rotting", then something in leadership is
      "rotting".
 
        mtgx - 3 hours ago
        When you have a thousands of "rotten apples" it's clearly a
        systemic problem.
 
      kbutler - 1 hours ago
      The intent of the saying is encouraging you to identify and
      remove bad apples, so they don't spoil the rest.The analogy
      is apt, but the question is identifying the bad apples - and
      asking if those on top are the bad apples spoiling the
      barrel.
 
      kowdermeister - 5 hours ago
      Spot on. Looks like the few bad apples are the leaders who
      created such a system that incentivized employees to mess
      with customer accounts.
 
    stephengillie - 6 hours ago
    I was friends in college with several other students who worked
    as entry level Wells Fargo tellers.  They were individually
    performing the account shenanigans described. To them, it was
    just a loophole to be exploited to pad their account opening
    numbers. Tellers were basically stack ranked on the number of
    new accounts they opened each month.None of them work for Wells
    Fargo anymore, and most have moved onto tech management or
    recruiter roles in the area. I'm not close friends but we're
    still in the same social circles, and I haven't heard of
    repercussions impacting them.
 
pasbesoin - 2 hours ago
At some point, the "disconnect" between shareholders (even and as,
on a massive scale -- especially and specifically these "too big to
fail" institutions) and their businesses needs to be breached.
Businesses with chronic, systemic wrong-doing need to be put down.
Wells Fargo is a prime, current candidate.If this were a Democratic
administration, or a rational Republican one, I'd say, it's time
for the FDIC (too bad Sheila Bair's no longer its head) to come in,
take over, and sell off Wells Fargo.And that we have a Savings and
Loan type investigation and prosecution, flipping the smaller fish
until we get to the top and lock them up.  (And strip them of their
ill-gotten personal assets.)At this point, shareholders should be
well informed as to where their growth and profits are coming from.
If they want to invest in such behavior, they should equally reap
the results, in financial terms.In other, if currently
unrealistically ideal words, "No one is above the law."At some
point, you have to act to effectively put the brakes on such
behavior.  Otherwise, it takes over.
 
  kbutler - 1 hours ago
  > If this were a Democratic administration, or a rational
  Republican one, I'd say, it's time for the FDIC (too bad Sheila
  Bair's no longer its head) to come in, take over, and sell off
  Wells Fargo.#1) but you didn't when it was a democratic
  administration#2) why does the party of the president determine
  what you would say?The history of too big to fail is littered
  with discarded ethics and increasing moral hazard on both sides
  of the aisle (80s, 90s, 00s, and 10s).
 
  ajmurmann - 2 hours ago
  It also touches on my biggest issue with corporate personhood.
  Corporations cannot go to jail. This needs to get fixed really
  bad. To me the solution is getting rid of the corporate
  personhood shield and prosecuting the individuals who actually
  made the decisions and send them to the same prisons we send drug
  dealers. No club fed.
 
  [deleted]
 
johnwheeler - 6 hours ago
All these headlines are way overblown by the media. If you think
this type of behavior is restricted to wells fargo (like the media
is making it seem), you're wrong. They just got caught.The total
damages done to wells custormers are in the low millions, while
wells fargo makes upwards of 20 billion a year. What I'm saying is
it's a product of a bad incentive system--not criminal master
planning by the managements to raise profits.
 
  a3n - 6 hours ago
  That's the beauty of a "bad incentive system" that is designed by
  management: plausible deniability.This was the execution of evil
  master planning by management, which included indirect rather
  than direct instruction. They knew that what they rewarded would
  get done, no matter the law.
 
    tedunangst - 6 hours ago
    Seems like a lot of work to make a few million dollars. Not to
    mention downside risk.
 
      a3n - 6 hours ago
      And yet here we are, discussing a thing that I seriously
      doubt happened by random chance. Was there an internal forum
      where the thousands of bad apples came up with this? Or were
      they reacting to obvious and enforced management preferences?
 
        tedunangst - 5 hours ago
        It's pretty obviously bank tellers had perverse incentives.
        But I'm not sure it's so very different than a company that
        pays the QA a bonus for every bug found, then wonders why
        the bug tracker is filled with crap.
 
          empath75 - 5 hours ago
          The difference is that filing fake bugs isn't theft.
 
          kbutler - 1 hours ago
          Yes, it is, just as much as creating fake accounts is.The
          difference is just that you're stealing from your
          employer, instead of your employer's customers.
 
      empath75 - 5 hours ago
      What's the downside risk? Getting a slap on the wrist fine
      that doesn't come close to clawing back profits?
 
        tedunangst - 5 hours ago
        I think it's very reasonably cynical to expect a bank to
        happily pay 50 million fines to make a billion in profit,
        but I don't think the numbers are working out in their
        favor here.
 
  skuhn - 42 minutes ago
  These accounts weren't created to make money for Wells Fargo,
  that's just a by-product of the mechanism used for this fraud.The
  fake accounts were used to make money for managers and executives
  at Wells Fargo by convincing shareholders, regulators and the
  company itself that performance was better than in reality.The
  victims of this type of fraud are not just the directly impacted
  consumers, whose damages are not just measured in unwanted fees
  but also in their damaged credit histories. The bank itself is
  also a victim -- which means unrelated customers who store their
  money, stock market investors, and the general public who may
  have some relationship with Wells Fargo through multiple degrees
  of separation. Just looking at the bank's misappropriated profits
  hardly tells the whole story of systemic and pervasive fraud.
 
a3n - 6 hours ago
No, they aren't fake accounts, they're real accounts, inflicted on
customers against their will and without their knowledge, and they
come with real damage.
 
  travmatt - 5 hours ago
  I'm similarly fascinated by the use of the passive voice when
  they are describing Wells Fargo committing more crimes. Imagine
  if the crime was committed upon them instead: "Bank robber
  uncovers that he robbed bank for more money than originally
  admitted."
 
    tedunangst - 5 hours ago
    That's not passive voice.
 
      briholt - 3 hours ago
      Something like passive voice was used in that comment.
 
  LarryPage - 1 hours ago
  fraud accounts
 
flatfilefan - 53 minutes ago
Seems like forensic analysts did not do such a good job the first
time. I wonder how could 1.4M fake accounts be missed when you do
an audit looking for ... fake accounts?
 
cknight - 6 hours ago
So one of the things I did for my project was to scan headlines
related to corporate ethics, so I could start listing overviews of
a company's record in this area.Needless to say, Wells Fargo has
pretty much been filling its own page  in ways that no other
company has been able (with the exception of Uber):
https://suitocracy.com/company/wells-fargoSeeing it all laid out
like that really makes me wonder how it still gets by with so few
consequences.
 
  throwaway613834 - 2 hours ago
  > one of the things I did for my project was to scan headlinesCan
  I ask where you scrape them from? (Google News?) Is it possible
  to scrape past headlines from somewhere too, or do you just have
  to keep up with it every day?
 
    cknight - 2 hours ago
    RSS feeds of various news websites give me a daily shortlist
    which I manually approve to prevent false positives and
    duplicate stories. Since that manual part essentially means I
    am using it as a feed reader, I assume that's not breaking any
    terms of service from those providers.For past news the only
    one I have been able to use is The Guardian's API, which is
    free for non-profits such as my Suitocracy project. It's... not
    great, but it's something. A start.
 
      throwaway613834 - 2 hours ago
      Ah I see, okay thank you!
 
  Steeeve - 2 hours ago
  That is very interesting.  Can I ask how you discern whether an
  article is related to ethics?
 
    cknight - 2 hours ago
    Simply by erasing stop words from a headline and then scanning
    the remaining terms for likely hits. The media has quite a few
    terms it likes to repetitively use in headlines for certain
    topics. I currently have about 100 terms to check a headline
    against. Think words like "environment", "bribe", "scandal",
    "accuse", "working conditions", etc...It's... not a
    sophisticated system. It misses some major stories, gives me a
    few false positives, and of course lots of duplicates from
    differing sources.But compared to what I had before (basically,
    nothing) it's a million times better.
 
  adventureadmin - 2 hours ago
  And meanwhile all my crypto is stolen by the gov at btce because
  of alleged fraud. They should do the same to wells Fargo.
 
    wolf550e - 1 hours ago
    Don't call cryptocurrency "crypto".
 
      LarryPage - 1 hours ago
      crypto
 
  samstave - 2 hours ago
  My mom worked for Wells, after it aquired Wachovia, which prior
  acquired the other bank she worked for...She said they were the
  most corrupt orgs she had worked with. Specifically, the Wachovia
  Construction Loan dept - then later Wells...All corrupt.
 
    hkmurakami - 1 hours ago
    Out of curiosity, did her org structure / leadership /
    messaging change at all after Wachovia was acquired? I've heard
    through the grapevine that that really wasn't a good
    acquisition for Wells, being very different wrt corporate
    culture.
 
    r00fus - 16 minutes ago
    Just imagine if this were just "how things worked at TBTF
    banks"?  I would not be surprised at all.
 
      samstave - 1 minutes ago
      I assume that it is
 
  diogenescynic - 4 hours ago
  >Seeing it all laid out like that really makes me wonder how it
  still gets by with so few consequences.Too big to fail. Check out
  the book "Chickenshit Club" if you want to see how this has all
  evolved since Enron and Arthur Andersen. The Justice Department
  is frequently paralyzed by politics and fear of causing economic
  harm to the country. Plus, several changes in legal precedents
  have made it much more difficult to prosecute companies and their
  executives.
 
    e12e - 4 hours ago
    Or maybe start with  Michael Woodiwiss: "Gangster Capitalism:
    The United States and the Globalization of Organized Crime" for
    a depressing look at the bleak history of corporate criminal
    behaviour...https://www.amazon.com/Gangster-Capitalism-United-
    Globalizat...
 
  a3n - 6 hours ago
  > Seeing it all laid out like that really makes me wonder how it
  still gets by with so few consequences.Lobbying and campaign
  donations, combined with executives going through the revolving
  door between government and corporate employment.
 
[deleted]
 
bdcravens - 4 hours ago
While we consider Wells Fargo's ethical failures, worth noting that
one of the startup darlings, Stripe, relies on Wells
Fargo:https://stripe.com/wells-fargo/legal
 
  uiri - 2 hours ago
  That is an agreement with Wells Fargo's Canadian
  branch/subsidiary. Wells Fargo Canada appears to provide services
  solely to businesses (i.e. no retail banking) so I believe that
  this subsidiary has nothing to do with Wells Fargo retail
  branches behaving unethically.
 
    throwaway613834 - 2 hours ago
    This is the kind of comment that just blows my mind (in a good
    way) when I read it. How do you suddenly just discover facts
    like this? Do you research it or do you just happen to know it
    beforehand? If it were me I would have just assumed it's the
    same Wells Fargo; it wouldn't have occurred to me to check that
    it's the one in Canada.
 
droopyEyelids - 7 hours ago
https://newrepublic.com/article/144144/give-wells-fargo-corp...Our
government granted Wells Fargo?s corporate charter, and it can take
it away.
 
  anigbrowl - 4 hours ago
  I said that at an earlier stage when far fewer fake accounts had
  been reported and it was considered too extreme a remedy. Oddly,
  many people who take a get-tough approach to law and order
  matters have a wholly different set of standards when it comes to
  punishing corporations.
 
  arca_vorago - 7 hours ago
  I've been arguing the gov use that threat for a while now, nice
  to see I'm not the only one. I got the idea reading about the
  British and Dutch east India companies, as the charter was the
  sword of Damocles the gov had over the companies.