GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-29) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Don't Fall for Babylonian Trigonometry Hype
31 points by robinhouston
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/roots-of-unity/dont-fall-fo...
___________________________________________________________________
 
anateus - 32 minutes ago
This is a great article touching on the several ways in which this
new Plimpton 322 hype is overblown. There's usually a paper like
that comes out every few years :)If you're interested in learning
more about Babylonian math-history I highly recommend Jens H?yrup's
Lengths, Widths, Surfaces.
 
chroem- - 25 minutes ago
This article seems to boil down to "stop liking what I don't like."
Is Wildberger's distaste for real numbers eccentric?  Yes.  Is
there anything fundamentally wrong with what he is proposing?
Absolutely not.As long as rational trigonometry is logically
consistent then you really can't argue against it except on
aesthetic grounds.  I don't see why popsci outlets like Scientific
American should feel the need to rally the public against rational
trigonometry on emotional grounds.
 
  AnimalMuppet - 21 minutes ago
  I didn't read it that way.  They are rallying against the claim
  that rational trigonometry is "superior" or "more accurate", and
  not on emotional grounds.
 
    [deleted]
 
  Lazare - 12 minutes ago
  I disagree.Mansfeld and Wildberger made a number of trivially
  provable false claims.  I read the SciAm article as 1) focusing
  on their false claims and 2) not trying to "rally the public"
  against rational trigonometry at all, much less on emotional
  grounds.In particular, Mansfeld and Wildberger (especially as
  reported in other outlets) are making the claim that "rational
  trigonometry" is more accurate, and that's a concrete claim with
  is 1) easily verifiable and 2) wrong.And that's not even touching
  on the bizarre claim that "we count in base 10, which only has
  two exact fractions: 1/2, which is 0.5, and 1/5."  There's so
  much wrong with that, it's hard to know where to start.
 
    chroem- - 3 minutes ago
    >that's a concrete claim with is 1) easily verifiable and 2)
    wrongI fail to see how it's wrong.  If you call Math.sin(x) it
    will return a numerical approximation of sin().  Would you care
    to elaborate rather than casually dismissing it?> There's so
    much wrong with that, it's hard to know where to start.Such as?
    60 has more prime factorizations than 10, and therefore using
    it as a numeric base will result in you encountering fewer
    irrational numbers.  You really can't argue against that.