GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Dylan: A New Language Is Blowin' in the Wind (1992)
62 points by e12e
https://www.schneier.com/essays/archives/1992/09/dylan_a_new_lan...
___________________________________________________________________
 
thomasjudge - 2 hours ago
"C++ is the COBOL of the 90's" - Jeff Alger
 
st3fan - 2 hours ago
Too bad Dylan never made it to the Newton. I?m actually not sure
that was ever the intention. Dylan was pretty heavy weight?
 
  dreamcompiler - 1 hours ago
  Dylan was a slimmed-down Common Lisp. I thought it was a pretty
  good idea at the time but when they dumbed down the syntax
  (removed the parentheses) I lost interest. It's ironic that full-
  blown Common Lisp could easily run on iphones today but Apple
  won't let it.
 
    jolux - 11 minutes ago
    What do you mean "Apple won't let it"? Who's stopping you? Just
    from Google I found https://wukix.com/mocl for example.
 
  osteele - 1 hours ago
  That was definitely the intention. It was intended as a systems
  and application programming language for the Newton.The original
  Apple implementation compiled to native ARM code. The runtime was
  intended to be competitive with C, but by the time we approached
  that target, large parts of the toolbox had already been written
  in C, and Walter Smith had created NewtonScript as a scripting
  language that worked as an alternative for non-performance-
  critical code. At that point the Cambridge team re-targetted the
  implementation to build Macintosh applications, but that wasn't a
  sufficiently compelling (to Apple management) use, and we had
  lost our executive sponsor when the director of the Apple
  Cambridge lab was promoted to a position in Cupertino.For those
  curious about Dylan's history, the Wikipedia page
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Dylan_programmi...
  looks correct.(I'm the ?Oliver Steele? mentioned on that page. I
  went to Apple Dylan from Skia ? later released as Quickdraw GX ?
  another technology that missed the Newton boat.)
 
dasmoth - 2 hours ago
The implementation was open-sourced and had a fair amount of work
put into modernising it.  Things seem to have gone quiet the last
couple of years, but it's out there if anyone wants to try
it:https://opendylan.org/
 
ekidd - 51 minutes ago
Ah, Dylan was a ton of fun.First, some personal background: When I
was an intern at Harlequin, I was one of the first users of
Harlequin Dylan. Later, when CMU stopped work on Gwydion Dylan, I
helped start an open source project to maintain it. And when
Harlequin wanted to start open sourcing their Dylan (which later
became https://opendylan.org/ ), I met with them to help hammer out
licensing details. Harlequin released a lot of cool code.What was
cool about Dylan? Well, it was a basically a relative of Common
Lisp, but with an infix syntax, but it had been simplified to
improve code performance. It was a more ambitious language than
Java, with full closures, basic macros, and generic functions.
Dylan had static typing if you wanted it, or you could leave code
untyped. (Unfortunately, collection and function types were fairly
weak due to the lack of standardized generic types.)In the end,
Apple's abandonment of Dylan and the rise of Java united to make
Dylan irrelevant. But it was a fun language, and I had a lot of fun
hacking in it. I think that the closest popular language at the
moment, design-wise, is probably Julia.I still remember one 20-hour
day that where a friend and I set up tower computers in a cozy
basement room at Dartmouth, and I eventually convinced the Gwydian
FFI tool to parse 10,000 lines of Linux headers.
 
coldtea - 3 hours ago
Ah, if only Dylan and Smalltalk had survived the 90s.
 
  protomyth - 2 hours ago
  I'm pretty sure the Pharo folks would say Smalltalk isn't dead
  yet.  http://pharo.org/ https://www.pharocloud.com/
 
    coldtea - 2 hours ago
    Yes they could say it, but popularity and support wise it
    wouldn't mean much.Survived = at least at the same level of use
    as Ruby, Python, PHP, etc -- or at least Go and Rust.
 
      protomyth - 2 hours ago
      I know its still used in several companies.  One of which is
      quite busy this time of year.  One of Smalltalk's big
      problems was the companies using it aren't very talkative
      about what they use.  Smalltalk is in a lot of the back ends
      keeping things moving.  Cincom and others still make a lot of
      cash off it.
 
      agumonkey - 41 minutes ago
      Unfair to compare to PHP and Ruby who blossomed because of
      the web.Go and Rust are recent and massively backed.I did a
      Pharo MOOC last year, ST is far from dead, it's "streets
      ahead" in many department its not even funny.
 
  e12e - 2 hours ago
  Going to repeat this here:A reminder to others, and a note-to-
  self that readable-lisp
  exists:http://wiki.c2.com/?SweetExpressionsThe wiki page makes a
  valid point; seemingly heavy lisp users will argue against
  non-s-expression syntax, but happily use prefix notation for
  quote, and infix for pairs...
 
  nine_k - 3 hours ago
  You can think of Ruby or even Python as of Smalltalk survived,
  and of Erlang/Elixir as of Smalltalk's original vision
  implemented, to a degree.
 
    coldtea - 2 hours ago
    The whole point of Smalltalk is:1) the integrated IDE/program
    experience, which Ruby, Python, Elixir do not give.2) the
    totally orthogonal and very limited set of concepts that build
    up to the full language. Something that Ruby, Python and Elixir
    also don't have.In Smalltalk even a for, if etc statement is
    not something special to the language. In a way it has fewer
    special forms than
 
      rothbardrand - 1 hours ago
      Swift seems to have both those qualities, if I'm interpreting
      you correctly.
 
        scroot - 22 minutes ago
        It's not the same. With a Smalltalk system, there isn't
        really an operating system. All activity we would normally
        ascribe to an OS is simply implement in the Smalltalk
        environment, using Smalltalk objects, running in a live
        image. I recommend checking out the Smalltalk-80 "Blue
        Book", which is beautifully written. You can also play with
        Pharo too, just be sure to understand that it's adapted for
        modern personal computers and therefore has to run as a
        virtual machine. A system that could run Smalltalk natively
        would be much better.
 
    pjmlp - 2 hours ago
    It is not the same without the IDE/full blown OS experience.
 
[deleted]