GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Rumours swell over new kind of gravitational-wave sighting
174 points by indescions_2017
http://www.nature.com/news/rumours-swell-over-new-kind-of-gravit...
___________________________________________________________________
 
[deleted]
 
andrewflnr - 4 hours ago
Normally, the scientific community is pretty careful about not
revealing results before they're fully baked (press
notwithstanding). Seeing how that control has broken down for this
incident, is it correct to infer that astronomers have pretty much
lost their minds over the possibility of capturing a neutron star
merger?Edit: calm down, people, I'm excited too.
 
  evanb - 4 hours ago
  LIGO didn't announce because they want to be sure.  But one of
  the most valuable aspects of LIGO is as a trigger for optical
  astronomy of transient, time-sensitive events.  So, when they see
  something, they have to tell a wider astronomical community---the
  other observers who look in non-gravitational channels---though
  they might not be ready to make the information public.  Each
  observatory comprises hundreds of people.  Suddenly your message
  isn't contained to just the hundreds of people loyal to LIGO, but
  to thousands of people.  Moreover, these observatories tend to be
  publicly owned and funded, and transparency and modern open-
  science practices often mean live updating of the status of these
  observatories.  Finally, there are the scientists who have
  nothing to do with this physics, but fought hard for some
  observation time and had their scheduled observations interrupted
  for something high-priority.  These people can infer (or are
  often told directly) why their allocation was preempted.
 
whoopdedo - 7 hours ago
> swell ... waveSomeone had fun writing that headline.
 
  ChuckMcM - 7 hours ago
  No doubt they will "crest" just before the announcement :-). And
  opinions will "undulate" over whether or not they are valid
  results.Perhaps we just need more drama in science classes to be
  more inclusive, "Will this acid change the Ph level of the
  solution? Or will its buffering protect it? Find out after the
  break ..."
 
    qubex - 4 hours ago
    You will never believe what happens to this falling feather in
    a vacuum!
 
    Fifer82 - 6 hours ago
    The sad thing is that I wouldn't be surprised. Then they can
    show you the same 3 minute buildup after the break in case you
    forgot.
 
MilnerRoute - 2 hours ago
"We are working hard to assure that the candidates are valid
gravitational-wave events, and it will require time to establish
the level of confidence needed to bring any results to the
scientific community and the greater public. We will let you know
as soon we have information ready to share."-- Statement from Ligo
http://www.ligo.org/news/index.php#O2end"This did not, in fact,
blow my sox off."-- Astronomer Peter Yoachim
https://twitter.com/PeterYoachim/status/901175225819176961
 
Koshkin - 3 hours ago
While I would have a trouble imagining a quantum of the space-time
curvature (the graviton), it is not hard to see that the changes in
the curvature could propagate in the form of waves. So, while yes,
an experimental discovery of these waves is an important event in
history of science, I am left curious as to whether it adds
anything to our present understanding of Nature...
 
  raattgift - 2 hours ago
  > trouble imagining ... the gravitonLet's start with a graviton
  as a gauge boson, mediating the gravitational interaction
  similarly to how the photon is a gauge boson mediating the
  electromagnetic interaction.First, let's start with "gauge".   We
  can use as an analogy an air pressure gauge, one that measures
  relative air pressures.   Let's take it to a place with a
  standard pressure (say, in conditions which are effectively STP)
  and tune our pressure gauge so that it reads "0" at that air
  pressure.   As we wander to and fro reading our calibrated gauge,
  we'll see pressures that are zero, positive or negative.   If we
  climb a tall hill we'll see a negative reading.  If the
  temperature drops we'll see a positive reading.If we contrive
  things so that we can take a reading of a generalized pressure
  with our pressure gauge everywhere in the universe at all times,
  we can construct a (classical) gauge field.  In deep space, the
  gauge will read strongly negative.  At the bottom of the ocean,
  or deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, or at the core of the sun it
  will read strongly positive.    In the early universe, it'll be
  strongly positive; in the far far distant future away from the
  black hole that will dominate our patch of de Sitter vacuum, it
  will read strongly negative.   We'll get zero values in some
  places, like near the Earth's surface through a lot of Earth's
  history, or in the upper reaches of Jupiter's atmosphere through
  a lot of its history.Our choice of "0" is not ideal, because "0"
  is only rarely the value at any point in our gauge field that
  permeates all of spacetime.    Instead we should set "0" as the
  value in extragalactic space, because then "0"s will dominate the
  field (indeed it is possible that all readings will then be non-
  negative).   In effect, when we set our "0" at STP we normalized
  the gauge field; when we decided instead to set our "0" in
  extragalactic space, we renormalized it.   We could obtain an
  ideal renormalization if we could sample the whole of spacetime
  and find the lowest reading of our pressure gauge, but we can
  certainly get rid of practically all negative values by taking
  far fewer samples in regions where we think the lowest readings
  might be.Once we have settled on a decent normalization, we could
  look at the propagation of nonzeros and study their statistics.
  If they follow the Bose-Einstein statistics, we'd call them
  "bosons".  If they follow the Fermi-Dirac statistics, we'd call
  them "fermions".  If they follow some other statistics, we'd
  assign them yet another name.   (Our choice of generalized "air
  pressure" probably follows some odd statistics.)Perturbative
  quantum gravity works something like this. [2]We have a
  background spacetime with a metric; we have a gauge that measures
  the deviation from this metric.   It'll be "0" at every point
  where the arrangement of stress-energy exactly matches the
  metric, and nonzero elsewhere.  We are interested in modelling
  the gravitational interaction as the arrangement of nonzero
  values in our field.   Patterns of nonzeros around
  gravitationally interacting matter themselves evolve (under a
  suitable decomposition of spacetime into 3+1 space and time) and
  interact like (classical) waves (made up of many molecules), and
  upon some study we can determine that these waves in our gauge
  field form patterns that strongly suggest they have a rotational
  symmetry of two, which we expect on theoretical grounds too
  because the metric is a rank-2 tensor field so particles
  representing the (change in the) metric field should be spin
  2.Conveniently, in a quantum gauge group theory, a particle with
  spin 2 is attractive of a particle with the same charge and
  repulsive of a particle with the opposite charge.   (Compare with
  spin 1, where same-charges repel and opposite-charges attract).
  [4]  So we can identify the nonzero numbers in our metric gauge
  field with gravitons.    This is amenable to study with
  perturbation theory.Unfortunately General Relativity is a non-
  linear theory and in our perturbatively quantized gravity, when
  you have a lot of high-energy gravitons they spawn more
  gravitons.  We would want to apply Wilson's thinking on
  renormalization and reset our gauge to "0" in a cluster of these
  high-energy gravitons by finding some suitable ground value in
  the cluster.   This is extremely successful up to a point [1],
  but as the energies of the gravitons increases we have to take
  more measurements to find a suitable ground value, and eventually
  we have to take an infinite number of measurements to find one.
  This is what is meant when you read "gravity is perturbatively
  non-renormalizable".There are, as you suggest with ("... space-
  time curvature ..."), other values related to the gravitational
  interaction that we can turn into a quantum field [3], but most
  suffer a highly similar fate: in some conditions we have to do an
  infinite amount of work to make our field values sensible and
  match observables.Finally the gauge field that we built on the
  metric is fully relativistic and generally covariant, so it works
  with any system of coordinates, choice of units, slicing of
  spacetime into 3+1, etc. that we want, up to diffeomorphisms (we
  have to remember that we chose a static background spacetime).
  So even though it gives us useless readings in some regions of a
  spacetime containing strong gravity, perturbative quantum gravity
  is a useful and standard tool.   However, it is not considered a
  candidate for a fundamental theory (barring some unforessen
  advancement in renormalization theory) rather than an effective
  theory and moreover by implication it undercuts General
  Relativity's claim to be a fundamental theory too.- --[1]
  Relativists tend to define "strong gravity" at this point, since
  we get correct results from renormalization at any energy lower
  than it.   Strong gravity only appears very close to
  gravitational singularities (and in the case of black holes, that
  means well inside the horizon).   If we are using the path-
  integral formalism then we'd find that we have "strong gravity"
  in this sense in every Feynman diagram containing at least one
  loop of gravitons.[2] https://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/0206071[3]
  https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Canonical_quantum_gravity[4] One
  might ask, "is there oppositely-gravitationally-charged matter
  anywhere"?  It's an OK question, and people have discussed it
  seriously.   Sabine Hossenfelder has touched on this a few times
  on her blog, including http://backreaction.blogspot.com/2017/04
  /why-doesnt-anti-mat... although while the photon has no
  electromagnetic charge, the graviton itself (in perturbative
  quantum gravity) has gravitational charge (this reflects the non-
  linearity of General Relativity).
 
smhost - 7 hours ago
As a non-science person who occasionally watches PBS documentaries,
could this have any implications for Hawking radiation?
 
  snissn - 6 hours ago
  Potentially this neutron - neutron star merger or ones that are
  detected in the future will result in the formation of a black
  hole and in that event we may get more data to help refine models
  of black holes and those refined models may give us insight into
  the mechanics of black hole radiation - but it would be a bit
  indirect and we'd have to get lucky. Also Hawking radiation is
  "very slow" and may never be measured directly in interstellar
  black holes
 
  kobeya - 7 hours ago
  I don't think so, no.
 
perseusprime11 - 2 hours ago
Someday could we ride these waves to Interstellar travel?
 
  Panoramix - 43 minutes ago
  No. The effect of the waves is so small that it required a
  gargantuan project to detect the strongest events. The LIGO
  detector is possibly the most sensitive instrument of any kind
  humans have made.
 
legohead - 6 hours ago
The idea of two neutron stars colliding gives me shivers.  To see
something like that would be mind boggling..
 
colordrops - 2 hours ago
I wonder if the gravitational wave would be physically noticeable
if one were near the event.
 
carbocation - 6 hours ago
My understanding is that black hole mergers are not expected to
have any optical-wavelength emissions, whereas neutron star mergers
should have emissions across the electromagnetic spectrum. Is that
distinction part of the excitement here?
 
  raattgift - 5 hours ago
  The matter and light radiated away from black hole (BH) mergers
  will all come from the accretion discs of each BH.  The accretion
  discs of the BH masses for which LIGO (and Virgo) is most
  sensitive will generally be fairly sparse, so the emissions will
  generally be fairly dim.For a pair of similar-mass neutron stars
  (NS) that merge into a BH, you can treat region of spacetime
  close to the merger as being filled with extremely dense
  accretion discs.   The density of matter leads very bright
  emissions, and the available geodesics produce radiation that
  will escape to infinity rather than being quickly absorbed close
  to the source (including within the dense matter around the newly
  formed BH as it settles into an accretion disc).   The picture is
  slightly different where the NS masses are highly unequal.The Max
  Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics at Potsdam Germany has
  done many numerical simulations of NS mergers.   NASA's animated
  one [1] where the NS are of substantially different
  masses:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw2sLcyV7VcSystems of mass
  that are barbell-shaped (a pair of heavy masses connected via an
  arbitrarily thin bar; for orbiting stars and BHs we take the
  limit as the bar goes to zero volume and zero mass) will radiate
  gravitational waves when they are spun about an axis on an axis
  perpendicular to the bar.   These spinning NSes will be radiating
  gravitational waves with increasing amplitude, and these radiated
  GWs remove angular momentum from the rotating system, allowing
  the NSes to move closer to each other.    By the start of the
  video, the GW radiation being emitted should eventually be
  detectable by instruments at enormous distances; that radiation
  has allowed the two NSes to reach a critical proximity.At this
  point the smaller NS disintegrates under tidal stress and its
  additional mass-energy-momentum that then begins falling onto the
  larger NS causes the larger NS to collapse into a BH.   A large
  proportion of the smaller NS remains in the region near the new
  BH and is swept up into an accretion structure alsong with s
  small proportion of the larger NS that did not get trapped behind
  the horizon.    The accretion structure is briefly very bright,
  especially in gamma rays, as the matter from the smaller neutron
  star self-collides until it is entrained into a dense disc.
  Those early gammas will be visible at enormous distances (e.g. we
  can pick up extragalactic NS mergers with sky-scanning
  instruments searching for gamma ray bursts [2]).By comparison,
  the smaller of a pair of mass-mismatched black holes cannot
  disintegrate (everything is stuck within each BH's horizon), and
  the larger of the pair is likely to have a sparser accretion
  disc, so the amount of disc-disc collision will be relatively
  low.  The reshaping of the accretion material around the merged
  BHs may be driven principally by the dynamical spacetime around
  the BH, with only occasional collisions.   While such collisions
  can be arbitrarily energetic (at the point where their geodesics
  intersect bits of matter may be moving ultrarelativistically with
  respect to each other), there are unlikely to be enough such
  emissions to be reliably detectable at large distances.- --[1]
  https://arxiv.org/abs/1001.3074[2] There is a timing-coincidence
  argument about a short gamma ray burst detected in this way and a
  detection by LIGO & Virgo that is circulating around the rumour
  mill.  Peter Coles blogged some detail
  https://telescoper.wordpress.com/2017/08/23/ligo-leaks-and-n...
  This may be an NS-BH merger, in which the picture is again
  somewhat different, and depends on the density of the BH's
  accretion disc both in terms of its matter content and in terms
  of the momentum (e.g. if the NS and BH are counter-rotating,
  collisions will be more frequent and more energetic).
 
    mturmon - 4 hours ago
    Thanks for this well informed comment. It links together some
    of the observing strategies and motivations really well.
 
  pducks32 - 6 hours ago
  Mostly but also because we haven?t ?heard? the waves caused by a
  Neutron star interaction before. So experimentally we still have
  to confirm that they cause GWs.
 
    raverbashing - 5 hours ago
    Which would be surprising if they didn't produce GW
 
      pducks32 - 4 hours ago
      Yea that would be very surprising.
 
      qubex - 4 hours ago
      Of course they produce gravitational waves! The main point of
      curiosity is likely that unlike black holes, that are
      "hairless" entities of pure curvature, neutron stars are
      complex objects with multiple, variable layers... and
      consequentially (I presume) the gravitational waves
      occasioned by their merger would both carry more information
      about the objects' composition and likely be more complicated
      (as well as less powerful at any given distance).I'm just
      guessing though.
 
  m1el - 6 hours ago
  That is correct.
 
saganus - 6 hours ago
This might be a naive question, but I'd like to clear it out.Do
gravitational waves travel at the speed of light?I know the theory
says nothing can travel faster than light. I also know that photons
can be seen as quanta or as waves. So my guess is that
gravitational waves travel at most, at the speed of light.But do
they? or do they travel slower? faster? Is there a doppler effect
for GWs?I ask because I would think ripples in the space-time
fabric itself might be a bit different than light waves or other
more studied phenomena.Can anyone point me in the right direction?
 
  sleavey - 6 hours ago
  The most popular theories say that yes, they do travel at the
  speed of light. Only a coincident detection of a gravitational
  wave and an electromagnetic counterpart would confirm this (such
  as from a binary neutron star coalescence; the binary black holes
  seen so far by LIGO didn't emit any visible EM as far as we
  know).
 
    tzs - 6 hours ago
    Would even a binary neutron star coalescence give us the
    information we'd need to answer this? Interstellar space is not
    actually empty. It contains a low density plasma, and so the
    speed of light in it is slightly slower than the speed of light
    in a vacuum.I have no idea if that plasma would also slow down
    gravity waves, but even if it does it wouldn't necessarily be
    the same amount [1].Maybe from the differences in arrival time
    of light at different frequencies we could figure out enough
    about the intervening plasma to figure out when the light would
    have arrived if the space had been empty, and check if that is
    when the gravity waves arrived?[1] Edit: I have done some
    Googling. Gravity waves would not be slowed down by the
    interstellar plasma. The slowdown of light through a medium
    depends on the existence of positive and negative charges in
    the medium that can form dipoles in response to the passing
    electromagnetic wave. For gravity all the "charges" are
    positive so there is no dipole formation.
 
      yorwba - 5 hours ago
      > For gravity all the "charges" are positive so there is no
      dipole formation.I'm no physicist, but couldn't lack of
      matter in some region otherwise filled with particles play
      the part of "virtual" negative matter?
 
    imaginenore - 5 hours ago
    We could build a second detector, sync their clocks, separate
    them, and measure the speed directly.
 
      greglindahl - 4 hours ago
      LIGO is 2 pairs of detectors.
 
  diegoperini - 6 hours ago
  Check out LIGO episode of PBS SpaceTime youtube channel. Some
  very informative explanitions about gravity waves are given
  there.
 
    Sir_Cmpwn - 6 hours ago
    +1 for PBS SpaceTime, easily one of the best channels on
    YouTube. Gravitational wave episodes:https://www.youtube.com/wa
    tch?v=1Tstyqz2g7ohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gw-
    i_VKd6Wohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ2RNBAFLj0
 
      erikpukinskis - 5 hours ago
      I really wanted to like PBS SpaceTime. So many interesting
      subjects and I love physics videos on YouTube. But there's
      something about Matt O'Dowd that makes them unwatchable for
      me. Something about the pacing, I just can't stay
      focused.Another great channel is looking Glass Universe -
      https://youtu.be/r0plv_nIzsQAnd Udiprod doesn't have a habit
      of making physics vids, but this is my all time favorite
      physics videos on YouTube which explains quantum waves better
      than anything else I've seen -  https://youtu.be/p7bzE1E5PMY
 
  SidiousL - 4 hours ago
  Your intuition is correct and the question of the speed of
  gravitational waves is pretty complicated.  The usual treatment
  of gravitational waves is done by linearization of some non-
  linear equations.  This is a very good approximation for the
  propagation of gravitational waves since they disturb the space-
  time only very slightly (for example, the mirrors in the
  interferometry experiment at LIGO get displaced by a tenth of a
  nucleus of a hydrogen atom, during the passage of a gravitational
  wave).In this linear approximation the gravitational waves are
  governed by the same wave equation as for electromagnetism (only
  the spin part is different since the spins of the gravitons and
  photons are different).  Since in the linear approximation we
  recover the Lorentz symmetry, then the linearized wave equation
  has to be Lorentz invariant.  Then, one can apply results from
  the representation theory of the Lorentz or Poincare groups;
  there are two major types of representations: massless and
  massive.  They differ in striking ways when it comes to spin and
  when it comes to propagation, for example massless particles
  travel at the speed of light.  If you want to have a massive
  graviton then you need to get the mass somehow from your theory.
  Einstein's theory predicts a massless graviton, which by the
  argument above has to travel at the speed of light.  We still
  don't know experimentally if the graviton is massless (but last
  time I looked at the Particle Data Book there was an upper bound
  on the mass which was very small).Now, coming back to why your
  question is complicated.  Remember that in Einstein's theory
  space-time itself is dynamical.  Now suppose you follow the
  propagation of a gravitational wave.  Since this takes some time,
  we need to take into account the fact that the shape of the
  space-time itself has changed in the meantime.  In such dynamical
  situations it becomes complicated to even define what the speed
  of propagation between two points is.  One way this becomes
  important is in cosmological situations.  For example, the
  expansion of the universe stretches the distances and this allows
  us for example to see further that the distance you obtain
  multiplying the speed of light by the age of the universe.  This
  being said, you can define the speed locally by studying
  propagation for very short distances and times and this will be a
  constant.  However, you need to remember that the global
  situation is more complicated.
 
  neom - 5 hours ago
  These PBS Spacetime episodes should help:The Speed of Light is
  NOT About Light - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msVuCEs8YdoIs
  Quantum Tunneling Faster than Light? -
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IfmgyXs7z8The Quantum Experiment
  that Broke Reality -
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlXdsyctD50Pilot Wave Theory and
  Quantum Realism -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlXdsyctD50The
  Future of Gravitational Waves -
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ2RNBAFLj0
 
    programbreeding - 4 hours ago
    Thank you for this. You linked to the youtube videos but I
    watch the PBS app on my Roku all the time and it's horrible at
    recommending what I should watch."Watched 'City in the Sky' [a
    3-part series about airports and planes]? You'll love Downtown
    Abbey or The Great British Baking Show!"I'm always looking for
    some actual good/educational shows on there, and there's so
    many great hidden gems, but they're all... hidden.
 
      iaw - 2 hours ago
      Setup your youtube account with liking/subscribing to the
      content you're interested in (even if it's from PBS) and
      you'll get some okay recommendations.
 
  yk - 1 hours ago
  Yes, though one has to go through quite a bit of trouble to
  actually show that. The big problem is, that speed of light is
  defined with reference to a background geometry and gravitational
  waves are a distortion of this background geometry. (And this has
  of course not be shown yet, however this observation, if the
  rumors are true, would be evidence for that.)
 
  bramen - 6 hours ago
  The speed of light is sometimes referred to as the speed of
  causality, and it seems like it's more of a fundamental speed
  limit on the propagation of events or information through space.
 
    amelius - 4 hours ago
    But the universe itself is expanding faster than the speed of
    light, [1] :)[1] http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/about-us/104
    -the-universe/c...
 
    QAPereo - 5 hours ago
    Also, yes, gravitational waves travel at c.
 
      Filligree - 4 hours ago
      (Caution: Pedantry ahead.)Gravitational waves are believed to
      travel at C, the theory says they should travel at C, and
      we're slowly narrowing in on C in measurements, but our
      ability to measure gravity waves is poor enough that we
      aren't yet quite sure.Which is one thing this observation
      would fix, assuming it's real.
 
        raattgift - 4 hours ago
        General Relativity (GR) is a metric theory of gravitation,
        with one metric to which everything couples.In GR
        gravitational waves (GW) have lightlike worldlines.
        Consequently, a source emitting both electromagnetic and
        gravitational radiation will have its GWs and EMWs  (or
        more generally its optical image and the direction in which
        things indicating its gravitational influence point) line
        up.   This has been well-tested observationally, for
        example by watching the deflection of light from distant
        objects (like quasars) around Jupiter (whose mass, orbit,
        and distance from us are all very well
        characterized).However, one can write down a bimetric
        theory of gravitation with different couplings.  It's
        possible to write down a bimetric theory in which
        gravitational waves move more slowly or more quickly than
        electromagnetic waves.It was fairly popular some years to
        take this kind of approach to solve some cosmological
        problems relating to the homogeneity within the horizon
        [1].  These were often cast as "variable speed of light",
        for aesthetic reasons fixing the speed of the gravitational
        interaction.  However, it is perfectly reasonable to call
        the same models "variable speed of gravitational radiation"
        fixing the speed of light, as one has many freedoms with
        respect to coordinate conditions in General Relativity.The
        problem is that these "variable speed of gravitational
        radiation" theories do not match observations of the
        galaxy-filled parts of the universe that we can see, and
        also does not match what we see in the Cosmic Microwave
        Background.  (Some bimetric models fail to match the
        results of laboratory-scale physics experiments too.)
        Viable bimetric theories thus have the second metric decay
        in the very very early universe, such that in the galaxy-
        filled epoch the speeds of light and gravitational
        radiation are identical, and physics becomes (outside of
        the very early universe) indistinguishable from their
        "standard" single-metric General Relativity based generally
        covariant formulations.    Such decaying-bimetric theories
        usually are designed to do away with cosmic inflation, but
        it becomes difficult to distinguish between cosmic
        inflation and viable bimetric-decay models because the
        observables eventually have to become identical, and the
        time at which they can differ gets pushed back further as
        we develop observatories which can resolve objects at ever
        higher redshifts, or as we can get better data on the
        anisotropies of the CMB.> we're slowly narrowing in on C in
        measurementsWe should determine c empirically, but we have
        already done so to exquisite precision.However, we can also
        fix c to some exact value (e.g. the CODATA value, or 1) and
        be mindful of the side effects of doing so.    This is, by
        far, the most common approach; you will be hard-pressed to
        find any formulation of a physical law which introduces
        uncertainty into the value of c, although it's certainly
        doable.The fixed CODATA value is extremely good.  The
        relative uncertainty in the speed of light is  principally
        driven by the uncertainties in interferometry, which at the
        time of the 1983 redefinition of the metre was less than
        0.1 part per billion (and is now less than a part per
        trillion, and so for all practical purposes is unimportant
        at scales of the observable universe).Finally, one should
        note that in a general curved spacetime, while the constant
        factor "c" arises everywhere, it can only be taken as a
        speed when comparing two objects that co-occupy exactly the
        same infinitesimal point in spacetime.   Comparing the
        speeds of distant objects is something that one should
        avoid in General Relativity.   However, everywhere in every
        spacetime, in vacuum conditions one should find the same
        "c" as the upper limit of relative speeds of objects just
        as they enter, co-occupy, and exit the same point.- --[1]
        https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Horizon_problem
 
          pcnix - 3 hours ago
          I must admit, I really enjoyed reading your comments on
          this thread.  Good work, and thanks for the effort!
 
      [deleted]
 
    deepnotderp - 6 hours ago
    +1 to this comment, it would remove a lot of mysticism to have
    called it "the speed of causality"
    instead.https://www.sciencealert.com/watch-why-the-speed-of-
    light-is...
 
    reubenswartz - 6 hours ago
    IIRC, everything moves through spacetime at c. Things with mass
    like people, planets, etc, move through the time portion as
    well as the space portion. As you go faster through space, you
    travel less through time, though at non- relativistic speeds
    you don't notice (GPS satellites do have to account for this).
    Electromagnetic waves have no mass, they don't travel in time,
    so the entire portion of their travel takes place in space, so
    we say they travel at the "speed of light."
 
      raattgift - 4 hours ago
      > everything moves through spacetime at cNo.  Everything has
      its own worldline through spacetime, and between two events
      at point p and q on a worldline through a given spacetime we
      can measure the interval dS between p and q.   When we
      normalize the interval against a set of coordinates and a
      chosen metric signature (here +++-) we can have three types
      of interval: dS^2 = 0 is lightlike, dS^2 > 0 is spacetlike
      and dS^2 < 0 is timelike.A concrete example using the
      Minkowski metric for a set of Cartesian coordinates dS^2 =
      dx^2 + dy^2 + dz^2 - cdt^2.     If we have a test object that
      always remains at the (x=0,y=0,z=0) origin of the coordinates
      then as the "t" coordinate increases with the passage of
      time, -cdt^2 is the only nonzero component of dS^2.  From t=0
      to t=10000 (where t is in, say, seconds) is perfectly
      timelike interval.   However, any way we vary x, y, and z,
      (measuring the coordinate distances in, say, light-seconds)
      if the changes are small compared to the constant factor c,
      we will have a timelike interval.    Light itself,
      conversely, follows a lightlike interval.   If we restrict a
      beam of light to move only on the x axis, then we have (in
      (light-)seconds and seconds) x=c, t=1; x=2c, t=2; x=3c, t=3;
      and so forth; the -c factor cancels out the change in x at
      each step, so dS^2 = 0.But bear in mind here that the
      Minkowski metric is just one of many known exact solutions to
      the Einstein Field Equations, and there are many many many
      known approximate solutions.   Moreover, we are free to use
      arbitrary coordinates.  The Minkowski metric looks different
      in spherical polar coordinates, for example.  We are also
      free to use arbitrary units.  We can even use the metric
      signature (-,-,-,+) if we like.  However, when we take all of
      these into account, we're left with the same distinction
      based on the interval: they're either lightlike, timelike, or
      spacelike.A lightlike worldline is one in which intervals on
      the worldline are always light-like; a timelike worldine is
      one in which intervals on the worldline are always
      spacelike.We have strong evidence and stronger theoretical
      reasoning to expect that massless objects will always have
      lightlike worldlines (and that light itself is massless)
      while massive objects will always have timelike
      worldlines.So:> Electromagnetic waves have no mass, they
      don't travel in time, so the entire portion of their travel
      takes place in spaceNo, they have lightlike worldlines.   An
      interval between any two points on the wave's worldline will
      be lightlike.   This generally means that changes in the
      spacelike coordinates will exactly match the change in the
      timelike coordinate multiplied by the constant factor c.
      However, under most reasonable choices of coordinates, the
      "t" coordinate will certainly vary from point to point along
      its worldline.However, one has free choice to decide which
      axis is timelike or spacelike, and different choices may seem
      like the natural ones to different observers.In order to cope
      with these sets of choices we write down the laws of physics
      in a generally covariant manner.    This has been one of the
      greatest successes of relativity; any proposed theory that
      cannot be written down in generally covariant form is almost
      certainly unphysical in some way.Lastly, the value of "c" is
      determined empirically, and will vary depending on one's
      choice of units.   Relativists will often use a system of
      units in which c is set to unity (c=1), for example, in order
      to simplify the form of equations.> (GPS satellites do have
      to account for this)The theory side of GPS relies upon
      covariance matrices.
 
        CamperBob2 - 1 hours ago
        That's a rather impenetrable, buzzword-laden way of saying
        exactly the same thing as the grandparent post: everything
        moves through spacetime at c, which is a velocity expressed
        as a 4-vector of constant length.  Increase one component
        and the others have to decrease to maintain the length.Put
        all your velocity into the time component and you can't
        move in space.  Conversely, if you put all of your velocity
        into the spatial components, you will freeze in time like a
        photon.
 
          raattgift - 30 minutes ago
          Sure, you can always choose useless systems of
          coordinates.
 
          [deleted]
 
        nileshtrivedi - 2 hours ago
        Can you recommend a book/resource that explains this from
        first principles and introduces the math involved as well?
        The books I've read either exclude math altogether or if
        they don't, they assume that reader already knows and
        understands all the math that is required for this.
 
          raattgift - 2 hours ago
          Just about any standard textbook on General Relativity
          will cover the content of my comment in the first chapter
          or so.I like Carroll's [ https://www.preposterousuniverse
          .com/spacetimeandgeometry/ ] and indeed, you get to deal
          with intervals and worldlines in chapter 1.It assumes you
          know or are ready to learn some differential calculus and
          how to read a formula with an integral but it (maybe a
          bit steeply) teaches tensors (and some aspects of vectors
          and scalars) across the first couple of chapters.
          Carroll provides some (quasi-)samples under the "Lecture
          Notes" tab, but the book itself has benefited from
          editing.  He also supplies links to alternatives that can
          be had for free-as-in-beer.
 
          spaceseaman - 2 hours ago
          You would be interested in this
          bookhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Road_to_RealityIt
          is quite long and dense but explains the math from first
          princples like you want.
 
          SAI_Peregrinus - 1 hours ago
          The classic text is "Grativation" by Misner, Thorne, and
          Wheeler. It's very dense, but very thorough. The other
          classic is "General Relativity" by Wald. They don't
          really include the math background though, for that you
          need texts on multivariable calculus.
 
        gnaritas - 47 minutes ago
        You are terrible at explaining things and are correcting
        someone who actually explained it much better than you,
        even if he is technically incorrect. Your jargon laden
        overly verbose response is wildly out of place in
        correcting a simple layman level description of something.
        It's not appropriate to respond to a simple metaphor by
        slinging general relativity equations, you've probably
        instantly turned off anyone reading this from your position
        and at the end of the day you aren't really saying anything
        different, you're just trying to sound smart.  If you are
        saying something differently, you've utterly failed to
        communicate it in any reasonable way.
 
      Swizec - 5 hours ago
      > Electromagnetic waves have no mass, they don't travel in
      time, so the entire portion of their travel takes place in
      space, so we say they travel at the "speed of light."This
      part comfuses me. If they don't travel in time, how do they
      have a speed? Light is a type of electromagnetic wave right?
      And it takes many years to travel to us from a nearby star.If
      we can measure or calculate the time it takes for light from
      some place to reach us, does that not imply traveling through
      time?
 
        [deleted]
 
        speeder - 4 hours ago
        Another way to think about it, is how time effects the
        object itself.Photons are completely immutable, while they
        travel they don't change at all, if a photon was a
        "smergsboard" it would remain "smergsboard" during the
        whole trip.One of the most interesting ways I saw
        explaining this, is imagine 'spacetime' as a cartesian
        space.You have 4 axis, X, Y, Z and time.EVERYTHING has
        speed of 'c', so you use trigonometry and rotations to
        figure the values, light, that have a speed of 'c' in the 3
        space axis, then obviously have speed of '0' in time axis.
        ----Now, one interesting application of that knowledge is
        how they figured the speed of neutrinos... As I just wrote,
        if something is travelling at speed of light, it is
        'frozen', never changing...But 10 years or so ago people
        figured that neutrinos change mid-flight, there are 3 (or
        more... people are unsure yet) 'flavors' of neutrinos, and
        during tests people noticed that even if you make a machine
        that generates only one specific flavor, what reaches on
        the other side is not necessarily that flavor, meaning they
        changed mid-flight...But if they change, then they have
        some speed in 'time', this means then that the speed in
        space must be smaller than light.Right now there are couple
        experiments where people are trying to use the changes in
        neutrinos to calculate their speed in 'time', and then by
        elimination figure their speed in space. I find it quite
        interesting, how people can use math to figure physics when
        our instruments aren't precise enough.
 
          sscarduzio - 26 minutes ago
          I wish HN had "reddit gold". Thanks for jotting this down
          for us, super clear and interesting.
 
        neom - 5 hours ago
        This might help: https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space-
        time
 
        azag0 - 5 hours ago
        Very trivialized: in some sense, you could say that for
        light itself, there is no time. In the same sense as there
        is no space for things that do not move (in space).
 
        erikpukinskis - 5 hours ago
        Think about a wave on a lake. It may appear to be moving in
        time. The water particles certainly move up and down. But
        if nothing is in it's "path" is the wave really moving?
        It's actually just there, the wave undulates and that
        creates the perception of motion, but really the thing you
        see moving is just a visual effect on the surface of a
        field the size of the entire lake. A field which is not
        moving at all.Photons are similar. You see the peak of the
        wave moving around, but the wave itself is everywhere and
        eternal... until other forces get involved anyway.
 
          bramen - 4 hours ago
          I'm not sure about this analogy. You can argue that the
          apparent motion of the wave crests is an illusion being
          pieced together by our brains when we see the totality of
          the elliptical movements of water particles at the
          surface.But at the moment when you drop a pebble into a
          pond, there are definitely parts of the surface which are
          moving and parts which are not, and the influence of the
          energy you introduced with the pebble can clearly be seen
          to spread outward over time.Granted this doesn't map
          directly onto electromagnetic waves because the
          mechanisms involved in wave propagation are different.
 
      colordrops - 2 hours ago
      So if you reach the speed of light does that mean you'll
      reach the end of the universe, being that time stops for you
      and speeds up for everything else?  Speaking of which, is a
      black hole just a window into the end of the universe?
 
    tannhaeuser - 5 hours ago
    Would you know if (the observable effect of) quantum
    entanglement is expected to travel faster than the speed of
    causality?
 
      fish_fan - 5 hours ago
      They entangle next to each other, and they move apart at max
      the speed of light. you'll have already paid the price for
      transferring that bit, so to speak.Information cannot move
      faster than the speed of light, period.
 
      Filligree - 4 hours ago
      Depends on your model of quantum physics.In none of them can
      information travel faster than light, but that isn't a
      satisfactory answer, since one half of an entangled pair
      still has to "know" what happens to the other in order to
      give the right result from measurements, even though that
      doesn't let you send information.In hidden-variable models,
      you can argue that the experiment outcome is defined "up-
      front". In the many-worlds model, both sides have both
      outcomes but the inconsistent ones "cancel out" as they meet,
      and pilot-wave interpretations are just many-worlds with one
      configuration picked out as "real".But in most of the rest,
      yes, something travels faster than light. That's a common
      argument against e.g. collapse interpretations.
 
  4ad - 5 hours ago
  All massless particles like photons and gravitons travel at the
  same speed, the speed of light. Yes, gravitational waves travel
  at the speed of light, and yes, of course they are affected by
  doppler shift.
 
  pducks32 - 6 hours ago
  Yea so the universe says nothing can move faster than a massless
  particle in a vacuum. The photon is the most famous?hence the
  speed of light?but any massless this can move at it. So GWs do
  theoretically move at the speed of light, though checking to see
  if they do requires a lot of analysis and is tricky to figure
  out. But yes theoretically they do move at the speed of causality
  (or the speed that things happen in the universe unless someone
  slows them down) I?m a physicist who?s now listened to a ton of
  LIGO?s founders talk about it.
 
  pedro_hab - 3 hours ago
  I have the same question, based on the Alcubierre Drive math,
  (Wrap Drive) which is based on that space can travel at any
  speed.But I also know that the Alcubierre Drive have some weird
  implications, such as the inner of the ship is causally
  disconnected from the space wrap, basically you can't control it
  from the inside.Anyways, I'm curious if the gravitational waves
  are "space waves", in that case it wouldn't have limit, as space
  can move at any speed.