GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-26) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Can we know what animals are thinking?
113 points by _dps
https://medium.economist.com/can-we-know-what-animals-are-thinki...
___________________________________________________________________
 
rwmj - 2 hours ago
There's a sci-fi-ish short story in The Mind's I
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mind%27s_I) about a robot which
scuttles around, when stroked it glows, then when it is hurt it
mewls and flashes its lights, and so on.  It's meant to question
whether we can really know what any other animal is thinking (the
machine is supposedly programmed like a regular computer, so we
know it has no real feelings).Of course this applies to robots, but
not necessarily to animals, where we know they are constructed
similarly to ourselves and so likely have feelings similar to ours
although there are questions to what degree.It's actually online
here: https://themindi.blogspot.co.uk/2007/02/chapter-8-soul-of-
ma...
 
  nur0n - 35 minutes ago
  Basically the animal analog of the turing test?
 
lngnmn - 9 hours ago
No. Animals don't think, because thinking requires language, based
on it conceptual thinking and related brain circuitry which animals
still didn't evolve.Signaling systems and elaborate warning cries
do not account for a language.Animals only feel. They have
emotions, environmental clues and heuristics, everything but a
language and hence no thinking by definition. That is exactly what
some call non-verbal,'animal' mind. Emotional states and behavioral
patterns and learning from  experience only. Look at toddlers to
grasp what it means.
 
  oh_sigh - 6 hours ago
  Why does thinking require language? Besides for you defining it
  as such.Ancient Inuits may have said flying requires feathers.
 
  _dps - 9 hours ago
  Unless you use an extremely narrow definition of "thinking"
  (yours is not commonly accepted among animal researchers, and is
  IMO too tautological to be useful), this is clearly disproven by
  decades of animal cognition research.Animals can form future-
  oriented plans, engage in risk management activities, can
  remember inventories of items stored in safekeeping locations,
  develop "cultural" dialects to their vocalization patterns, and
  much more. You can find a good start on the current state of the
  research herehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal_cognition
 
    lngnmn - 9 hours ago
    Definition of thinking, like definition of sex, or any other
    biological trait cannot be broadened. That would yield
    nonsense.Thinking implies language. Without language it is
    feeling. Period.Learning from experience, map making and even
    planning, as one might see in case of machine learning and
    other branches of AI, does not require thinking. It is a lower
    level of activity, relative to abstract reasoning, like pattern
    recognition.
 
      EliRivers - 4 hours ago
      Thinking implies language.Just plain incorrect. I will now
      present as much evidence for my statement as you presented
      for yours:As you can see, it's a pretty ineffective technique
      and since you're starting from the overwhelming minority
      position, you're going to have to do a lot better.Everything
      I'm saying here comes across as passive-aggressive childish
      bullshit, but in this case it's also true.
 
      csomar - 8 hours ago
      You are being downvoted because you are making strong claims
      without having anything to back it up. You are free to have
      your own definitions of things but people like to have the
      same. This helps in carrying on a useful conversation.
 
        roceasta - 4 hours ago
        Yes. To be fair I think most people here want animals to be
        able to think (and for other humans to think that animals
        can think) because they want animals to be protected from
        humans.
 
      dTal - 8 hours ago
      Why don't you just call what you are talking about
      "language", instead of contradicting what literally everyone
      else means by "thinking"?
 
      Simon_says - 9 hours ago
      A lot of my thinking is pictorial.  Are you saying I'm not
      thinking?
 
        lngnmn - 9 hours ago
        Yes, it is another kind of activity.To ask "what animals
        are thinking" is exactly the same as to ask "what a self-
        driving car or a smartphone are thinking".
 
          psyc - 7 hours ago
          To ask "what is this mammal thinking" is self-evidently
          closer to asking "what is that mammal thinking" than it
          is to "what is that computer thinking".
 
          srtjstjsj - 4 hours ago
          Those are good questions with unknown answers. Another
          good question is "what people are thinking?"
 
          Simon_says - 7 hours ago
          You're coming to this discussion with an unjustified
          assertion that thinking is very narrowly defined and then
          circularly showing that other kinds of things that
          neurons can do are not "thinking" because they don't fit
          the definition.In the huge space of all possible kinds of
          cognition, humans have only ever occupied the tiniest
          sliver.  There's modes of thought out there that we can't
          conceive of.
 
      _dps - 9 hours ago
      Google gives me the following two definitions for "think":1.
      have a particular opinion, belief, or idea about someone or
      something.2. direct one's mind toward someone or something;
      use one's mind actively to form connected ideasNeither seems
      to mention language as a pre-requisite. In any case, you seem
      to have strong beliefs contrary to my understanding of animal
      research, so I will not bother you further.Have a good day.
 
        lngnmn - 9 hours ago
        Google 'belief' and 'idea' too.
 
      yulker - 9 hours ago
      Is this the clinical or technically precise definition of
      what thinking is? Or is it your own definition?
 
      sgt101 - 8 hours ago
      If a man is robbed of language by some misadventure, then is
      she robbed of thought?
 
      eighthnate - 8 hours ago
      >  relative to abstract reasoning, like pattern
      recognition.You mean like the patterns the puffer fish
      creates to attract mates?https://youtu.be/yaPmYYWsixU
 
        srtjstjsj - 4 hours ago
        Can wind think?https://www.google.com/search?q=sand+dune&so
        urce=lnms&tbm=is...
 
  coldtea - 9 hours ago
  Citation needed.
 
    lngnmn - 9 hours ago
    Philosophy 101.
 
      coldtea - 8 hours ago
      More like Tautology 101: Circular Reasoning.
 
  eighthnate - 9 hours ago
  > Animals don't think, because thinking requires language and
  abstract brain circuitry which animals still didn't
  evolve.Animals certainly can think. And they have limited
  language, certainly not as complex as ours, but they are capable
  of communicating with each other.Just because humans are much
  smarter doesn't mean animals don't think.>  Look at toddlers to
  grasp what it means.Toddlers certainly think, though not on the
  same level as older children and adults. And certainly many
  animals like chimps, pigs and crows can think better than
  toddlers.> Animals only feel.If animals only felt and couldn't
  think, how can they think to use
  tools?https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/09/this-cr
  o...https://youtu.be/DDmCxUncIychttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Too
  l_use_by_animalshttps://youtu.be/5Cp7_In7f88
 
  sddfd - 9 hours ago
  It's quite convenient to think that, because we eat animals.I'm
  not a vegetarian, I enjoy steak and pork chops a lot.But I think
  animals, especially cows and pigs, are more conscious of their
  existence than we like to think.I tend to agree that speech plays
  a central role in how our thoughts are organized, but I think the
  importance of being able to articulate oneself /with language/ as
  a measure of consciousness and intelligence is generally
  overestimated.
 
    tpeo - 8 hours ago
    I don't see how it would be "convenient", since it doesn't seem
    necessary that an animal be conscious for us to require
    ourselves to not harm it out of a moral concern.Babies are
    either unconscious or have a very low degree of consciousness,
    but infanticide is still morally abhorrent.
 
      sddfd - 7 hours ago
      I agree that there is a moral aspect to eating sentient
      being, whether they are conscious or not.Your argument,
      however, is mixing the aspects of consciousness, and
      cannibalism in the form of infanticide. To me, that doesn't
      seem to be fair.
 
        tpeo - 7 hours ago
        Hey, I didn't say anything about eating the baby! You're
        the one thinking about it. Check yourself before you wreck
        yourself.What do you find unfair about the example?
 
  tpeo - 7 hours ago
  I find it funny that you're being downvoted to shit for holding
  an opinion which actually was quite common in the philosophy of
  mind, and which hasn't been quite yet superseded. Or at least I
  guess so, because nothing in philosophy ever really is.The
  identification of thought (or rather reason) with language was
  explicitly advocated by Descartes in part V of the Discourse on
  the Method, where he suggested a test for distinguishing a
  perfect automaton from a human being. It's a view more often
  associated with him, but other early modern thinkers such as
  Locke, Leibniz and Kant made similar statements.But in each case
  they were also more concerned with abstract thought, rather than
  just the general information processing that all animals do.
 
    _dps - 5 hours ago
    No one would have objected to a comment like: "One school of
    philosophy holds that thinking is inherently linguistic, so in
    that sense animals probably can't think."People are objecting
    to the unsubstantiated, doctrinaire, insistence on this very
    narrow definition to the exclusion of all others, including the
    ones used by people who research animal cognition for a
    living.I don't see why anyone should exclusively care what
    Descartes has to say about it when we have an additional 400
    years of science after his death that suggests he didn't have
    the whole picture.
 
      tpeo - 4 hours ago
      Why should they object to it, though? If an unsubstantiated
      claim can't be said to be anything other than an opinion,
      then it's just his opinion. Plus, it doesn't really matter
      whether he was being "doctrinaire" or not, because nothing
      was actually being imposed of me. I'm not being forced to
      subscribe to this view, I'm not being threatened (e.g. with
      getting a low grade, being fired, being burned at the stake).
      And I doubt he would have insisted in his view, too, if it
      weren't for the response it caused.Furthermore, I don't
      believe anyone should exclusively care about Descartes'
      thought on the matter, whether in the light of contemporary
      science or not. I just tallied my thoughts as they came,
      really. But I do believe that there's a way to reply to
      comments which maximizes the likelihood of there being at
      least some degree of mutual understanding and which minimizes
      the likelihood of conflict, and that is to have a charitable,
      unassuming reading of the comment in question, and to not
      take offense. And that people should either have that, or not
      to discuss at all. Else, they might as well talk to the
      wind.The whole exchange of comments we have in mind, for
      instance, was to little or no benefit to everyone involved,
      being little else than comments of "uh huh" and "nuh huh"
      back and forth.
 
        kinkrtyavimoodh - 4 hours ago
        OP literally started their comment with "No." and followed
        it up with 3?4 blanket assertions.Slatestarcodex has a
        comment policy (http://slatestarcodex.com/comments/) that I
        think is very relevant here too because I think that's how
        people implicitly judge most comments?"If you make a
        comment here, it had better be either true and necessary,
        true and kind, or kind and necessary."OP's statement was
        not 100% true so it should at least have been necessary /
        relevant AND kind / humbly put. It wasn't kind.
 
          tpeo - 4 hours ago
          I didn't say he was kind.I am good to people who are
          good.I am also good to people who are not good.Because
          Virtue is goodness.People should be thought as being free
          to speak their mind in whatever way it suits them. Not
          because they should, but because they will. And when the
          time comes, it's up to me whether to make an issue of it
          or not. And in so far as I know, I'd rather not.
 
          AsyncAwait - 14 minutes ago
          It has nothing to do with being kind. It has a lot do do
          with contributing to the discussion with something
          useful. Just asserting things without any evidence is not
          useful and thus downvoted to make more room for more
          useful comments nearer where people would see them,
          that's all.
 
      weirdstuff - 4 hours ago
      I'm not really biased one way or the other on the upthread
      conversation, however I think you'll find the Descartes'
      thinking continues to underlie a great deal of what we call
      modern science (or more precisely: our defining
      interpretation of universal phenomenon) and many of the
      applications that come with that.You can find great nuggets
      in modern work just as you can find great nuggets in older
      work, too. It's not that disposable!
 
    lngnmn - 6 hours ago
    Exactly. Information processing is information processing, and
    thinking is a process which is based on a language.Otherwise it
    loses all meaning - cells are thinking, tissues are thinking,
    computers are thinking, bacterias, etc.People seem to forget
    that "thinking machines" is still a metaphor which cannot be
    interpreted literally.
 
      srtjstjsj - 4 hours ago
      Your ongoing mistake is that you are obsessed with a specific
      word choice "thinking", and not paying any attention to what
      the word represents.
 
      tpeo - 4 hours ago
      Honestly, I don't think it's such of an issue. If there's a
      real difference between the kind of information processing
      that occurs within a cell from that which occurs within the
      brain, it doesn't really matter what it is called.Of course,
      the language within any field matters to the practitioners in
      that field. Things can be as easy or as hard to understand as
      the strictness and clarity of the language in that field
      allows it. But what do I mean is that, if any expression in a
      field ever fell in to such a degree of obscurity as to be
      said to have "lost all meaning", whatever it described still
      might be independently rediscovered later on. So meaning
      isn't something that needs to be formulated into a
      categorical imperative, or otherwise we might lose it
      forever. Striving towards clarity and towards a
      discriminating usage of words is a practical rule, not a
      moral one.Plus, arguing definitions is never a sound choice.
 
  EliRivers - 4 hours ago
  AH, you again. I think I recall you went off on a long thread
  about this not so long ago. You posit (without proof) that if a
  creature has no language, it cannot think, because only the parts
  of the brain that deal with language are capable of
  thinking.There is a large amount of experimental evidence showing
  some animals planning for the future, imagining what other
  creatures will do based on what they have seen, making tools,
  saving tools for the future to deal with predicted future
  situations, solving puzzles they've never seen before (did they
  learn to solve puzzles they've never seen before from
  experience?), beating humans in gestalt tests, communicating via
  sign language (how about those animals? They communicate via sign
  language; do they think?), and various other things that by any
  sensible definition are the product of mental processes everyone
  else here considers "thought".It seems that as far as you are
  concerned, "thinking" is defined as something to do with
  language. Everyone else is using a different definition. If you
  clearly explained your definition of "thinking", perhaps this
  will turn out to all be a misunderstanding and you're actually
  saying something completely different.Simply stating over and
  over that without language there is no thought does not help your
  case, as everyone else here considers that to be trivially
  falsifiable by the animals they see doing things that must be the
  product of thought.
 
gamad - 8 hours ago
I'm always afraid that if I knew what my cat was thinking I'd be
disappointed. Like "I wonder if I can kill and eat him?"
 
  csomar - 8 hours ago
  Cats and Dogs are very aware of human beings, and no, they are
  not interested in killing or eating you.
 
    jdavis703 - 8 hours ago
    As someone who gets chased by a dog at least once a month on my
    daily commute I'm pretty sure they do want to eat me. Maybe a
    couple are just trying to herd me but I think you underestimate
    their prey drive.
 
      XorNot - 8 hours ago
      A lot of cities have a feral cat problem. Very few have a
      feral dog problem, because a feral dog problem rapidly
      becomes a feral dog pack problem, and it turns out a pack of
      feral dogs is pretty good at hunting people.
 
        csomar - 6 hours ago
        Yeah, I live in a third world and the government regularly
        clean the place out of "aggressive" dogs. I do have dog
        packs just near my residence and sometimes it's like 7-8
        dogs just in front of entry. But they are not aggressive
        and only pregnant females will follow humans and peg for
        food.If the municipality doesn't clean the area it would be
        a "real" danger against kids.
 
      csomar - 8 hours ago
      I'm pretty sure they are not (unless it is a pitbull or
      something). Most breeds of dogs will not attack humans. They
      are aware of the difference in physical strength.Also, if
      they are real aggressive, I assume a catastrophe has already
      happened or is in the making (especially with a child?). The
      authorities have not intervened yet?
 
        srtjstjsj - 4 hours ago
        > unless it is a pitbull"pitbull" isn't a dangerou breed,
        it is a correlation signal for a psychotic owner that
        torture dogs to make them violent.
 
      lisper - 8 hours ago
      > I'm pretty sure they do want to eat me.I don't know if
      you're being flippant or not, but the desire to eat humans
      has long been bred out of the domestic animal gene pool (and,
      frankly, out of most of the wild animal gene pool as well).
      The dogs who are chasing you almost certainly just want to
      establish their dominance over you and defend their
      territories.  It's also possible that they want to play.But
      any dog that is chasing you, or any other human, needs to be
      put on a leash.  You should have a chat with the dog's owner
      and point out to them, politely but firmly, that an off-leash
      dog chasing people s serious liability risk for them.  And if
      the dog doesn't have an owner you should call you local
      animal control.
 
    _jal - 8 hours ago
    Cats do, in fact, snack on deceased owners. Whether they enjoy
    it, I can't say.When I had a cat, I'd fairly frequently wake up
    with her staring at me, sitting on my chest in the "breath
    stealing" position. I always imagine her inner dialog being
    something like, "Morning! Are you dead yet? Can I eat your
    eyes? OK, not dead yet. Scratch my nose?"
 
      mitchty - 4 hours ago
      Dogs also snack on deceased owners. In as little as 45
      minutes as well.http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/06
      /pets-dogs-cats-ea...
 
      dboreham - 7 hours ago
      Long ago I had a large orange cat. He would sit on my chest
      to wake me up. If I didn't wake up he would hook the end of
      one of his claws into that sensitive piece of flesh the lies
      between the nostrils, and pull hard. I'm pretty sure he would
      have eaten me too if I didn't respond to that stimulus.
 
arthurwinter - 3 hours ago
I find it incredible that in 2017 people still debate if animals
can think. You just need to interact with one or more dogs to
understand that they think, and in most cases they think much
better than humans.Lately seeing what humans did and still do to
planet Earth, and what they do to each other based on completely
made up topics like religion or plain material topics like skin
color is making me wonder if humans can really think, or we just
pretend to.I stopped eating animals this year, after I finally
realized how cruel the entire food industry is, AND how damaging it
is to the environment.If humans pretend to be more intelligent than
animals, the minimum thing they can do is looking forward
preserving and taking care of fellow animals that were not "gifted"
more abilities.
 
  BartSaM - 4 minutes ago
  While I agree with some parts, the overall message sounds like a
  pseudoscience.Only because you have negative feelings toward some
  people and some actions - you cannot compare this to the whole
  society. The problem is with the system that allows bad people to
  be in power. Not with the society in general.While the world is
  not in the best shape, it is not a disaster as well. Show me any
  other invasive species that will on purpose creating areas, where
  animals, with no use to us, are protected and can live
  freely.Your message literally categorizes all people, even the
  good ones. Apocalyptic thinking like that can do only bad, not
  good. I would suggest for you to look at the good things that we
  do as well. Center your position a bit and hear both sides of the
  story.As of not eating meat. There are ways to eat meat that is
  not from the "cruel industry". Supporting small, local farmers
  can help the local community and allow you to eat healthily and
  animals that have roamed freely and enjoyed their lives. But this
  requires doing some research, driving and time, which people do
  not want to sacrifice.
 
  Koshkin - 3 hours ago
  > if animals can thinkWell, it is not an easy question to answer.
  First off, everyone would agree that humans, apes, dogs,
  squirrels, spiders - all "think" in essentially different ways.
  This is important. Humans, for example, think mostly in terms of
  the language (words, phrases) - the way they would talk to other
  people (or post on Facebook, for that matter). Other animals do
  not do that. From that perspective, computers are closer to
  humans than animals. Again, this is an important difference that
  cannot be ignored. It would help if we had different words for
  these different levels of "thinking", but we don't.
 
    aleksei - 2 hours ago
    Can you point to some to research on the subject? I would think
    it's not at all clear in which manner animals think,  be it in
    terms of a language or not. Even for humans language may just
    be a layer on top of thought, and in fact there are those who
    claim not to think in any specific language.
 
      gaius - 2 hours ago
      This is called the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis if you want to do
      more reading
      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_relativity
 
    FooHentai - 46 minutes ago
    I have a pet theory (hypothesis?) that infant amnesia is due to
    acquisition of language. When you gain language and start
    thinking in it, you lose the ability to meaningfully access
    memories made beforehand.
 
    khedoros1 - 44 minutes ago
    >  First off, everyone would agree that humans, apes, dogs,
    squirrels, spiders - all "think" in essentially different
    ways.I wouldn't, and a lot of the other comments on this story
    imply that they wouldn't, either. As an example, when I think,
    it's not usually in the form of words until I try to map my
    thoughts and feelings into a more concrete form. I'm
    particularly conscious of this because I frequently wrack my
    mind looking for the word that closest matches the thought that
    I'm trying to convey. The thought itself starts in a wordless
    form.I can force my thoughts into an "audible" internal
    monologue, and I do when I'm reading, writing, or conversing,
    but it's a relatively forced way of thinking for me.
 
  wyager - 3 hours ago
  Animals aren't "eco-friendly" because they're intelligent; if
  they're eco-friendly at all, it's because they're too dumb to do
  otherwise. Many animals (cf invasive species) are extremly
  destructive.Many animals exhibit a much greater degree of
  tribalism than humans. Consider wild canid species like wolves.
  Tribalism in humans isn't "made up" either, it makes a lot of
  sense from an evolutionary perspective even if it's possibly not
  as useful today.
 
  alexashka - 1 hours ago
  Cynicism and emotional hyperbole are some of the less appealing
  and helpful human traits.Given the choice of being around
  lifelong cynics who think people ought to act the way they think
  AND vegetarian, or people who have a positive mindset and snap
  the necks of rabbits and shoot deer every weekend, I'll take the
  rabbit killers every time.When I was younger - I thought I was
  smart because highschool teachers are not terribly bright. Then I
  got out into the real world and realized a thing or two.When
  you're a cynical crybaby in school - they have to put up with
  you. When you're a cynical crybaby out in the real world, you'll
  be alone writing things on the internet because nobody wants to
  hear it, or around other losers, complaining about how everyone
  else is doing it wrong :)
 
  shanev - 2 hours ago
  I agree with your overall sentiment. But just because there
  aren't animals on your plate, doesn't mean they weren't killed in
  bringing food to your plate. For example, published studies show
  that at least 25 times more sentient animals are killed per
  kilogram of useable protein when producing industrial wheat and
  other grain [1].Not eating animals isn't enough. You have to find
  ethically sourced food. So ironically, eating meat from animals
  raised on pasture causes less animal cruelty than eating
  industrial wheat / grain-based food.[1]:
  https://theconversation.com/ordering-the-vegetarian-meal-the...
 
    amelius - 16 minutes ago
    I think explicitly or implicitly, vegetarians try to not eat
    sentient beings, but the story is more complicated because
    there is a scale for that, with plants being at the bottom of
    the scale, and mice further up the scale, and then cows, and
    finally humans.So in this perspective, does the article you
    linked to really make sense?
 
    [deleted]
 
  Teichopsia - 3 hours ago
  First an anecdote. I was laying on the floor in my bedroom and my
  dog wanted to come in. I told her not to, she stood with her
  front paws at the entrance for half a second, did a 180 degree
  turn, body inside the room and started to walk in backwards. I'll
  never forget that.I agree with what you say but have yet managed
  to stop eating them. They taste good. Hopefully one day I'll
  manage to grow some more backbone.Whether they communicate or
  not, of course they do. At a different level, obviously. Who's
  fault is it for not being able to understand? Theirs because "we"
  are smarter? That's arrogant. Heck, we have trouble communicating
  with each other properly.And... I can't remember what the other
  comment below was talking about and I'm going to have lunch.To
  end, can't remember exactly how to search for it. It went
  something along the lines of "2014 Cambridge [something]". Where
  several scientists and other fellow people smarter than myself
  signed a treaty stating animals are conscious. If I remember
  correctly.
 
    DominikPeters - 2 hours ago
    Cambridge Declaration on Consciousnesshttps://en.wikipedia.org/
    wiki/Animal_consciousness#Cambridge...
 
    ChristianBundy - 2 hours ago
    > Hopefully one day I'll manage to grow some more backbone.No
    pressure, but personally I spent a few hours watching
    documentaries on Netflix and I completely flipped from
    "logically plants are more efficient" to "I will avoid animal
    products as much as possible/practical". You may have a
    different experience, but it's extraordinary how much effort is
    put into keeping consumers unaware of where these products come
    from.
 
jbuzbee - 9 hours ago
Obligatory:https://img.ifcdn.com/images/e7aa1c63573be10d2cb7b18edc5
5b0d...
 
  csomar - 8 hours ago
  I'd disagree and say that animals do in fact "talk" or convey
  meaning. I have raised multiple dogs and with time your
  understand their needs: I want to eat, I want to play, I want to
  show you something (or alert you of something). These are the
  three things that most dogs will learn to convey to you.We
  consider that animals are of a lesser species so that we can take
  advantage of them without any "legal or moral" consequences. Like
  we eat animals on a regular basis. We do deadly trial medicines
  on them. We raise animals against their will (like birds) and
  cage them.
 
    dTal - 8 hours ago
    >We raise animals against their willTo be fair, I don't
    remember being asked either.
 
  ronjouch - 9 hours ago
  Obligatory SMBC: http://www.smbc-comics.com/index.php?id=3864
 
blackRust - 3 hours ago
I would always recommend _Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart
Animals Are?_ by _Frans de Waal_, it was a thoroughly enjoyable and
enlightening read.https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30192493-are-
we-smart-en...
 
mouzogu - 8 hours ago
I think the more rational position would be that animals do think,
as we are animals, and we think. To claim that animals do not think
has no basis outside of our own condescending perspective. If we
cannot prove one way or another then I feel my position is the more
rational and should be the default position.
 
  interfixus - 7 hours ago
  Exactly. I have enormous difficulty understanding how anybody
  could fail to hold this view.
 
    [deleted]
 
  gruez - 7 hours ago
  >I think the more rational position would be that animals do
  think, as we are animals, and we think.    *x* can *y*, as *z* is
  a subset of *x*, and *z* can *y*.   See the issue here?
 
    yorwba - 4 hours ago
    You left out the quantifiers.? x : X . x can y ? ? z : Z . z
    can y ? ? z : Z . z : XIn English: There are X that can y
    because there are Z that can y and all Z are X. Nothing
    contradictory there.While it is not always clear what the
    intended quantifiers are, it is usually best to choose the
    interpretation that doesn't make a statement trivially false.
 
    mouzogu - 6 hours ago
    I never said my position was logical, just rational so far as
    it's based on my limited subjective reasoning.
 
      gus_massa - 4 hours ago
      Some animal don't have a nervous system
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sponge and some have a system
      that is extremely simple
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planarian . Saying that they
      can "think" is extending the concept too much, and will not
      be a useful concept.
 
  glenstein - 7 hours ago
  Right. And to phrase your point in a way that relates to the
  concern of anthropocentrism that often comes up in these
  contexts: what could be more anthropocentric than thinking that
  thinking belongs exclusively to humans?People are so worried
  about projecting human qualities onto non-human things that they
  go the opposite extreme and assume that a whole range of
  qualities gets to be claimed as exclusively belonging to humans.
 
  roceasta - 4 hours ago
  You're trying to explain why you think animals can think. The
  desire and the ability to explain things, and not thinking per
  se, is (I guess) what distinguishes humans from animals.
 
    AsyncAwait - 54 minutes ago
    > The desire and the ability to explain things, and not
    thinking per se, is (I guess) what distinguishes humans from
    animals.But how do you know that animals have no desire or
    ability to explain things to each other, at least amongst their
    own species? We may not be able to read it, but it doesn't mean
    it doesn't exist, we already know that a parent can 'teach' its
    offspring that something is dangerous, for example among
    elephants this is even fairly easily observable.
 
      roceasta - 37 minutes ago
      I don't. It's a guess. But I do think our ability to explain
      things comes not just from our genes but from our culture,
      and culture is something animals haven't yet developed.
 
        AsyncAwait - 4 minutes ago
        I appreciate your answer since I find this fascinating;>
        and culture is something animals haven't yet developed.I
        know they don't have movies and such, but they do seem to
        have dialects, activities and behaviours based on various,
        (including location-based) factors even among the same kind
        of animals that one could classify that collection as being
        a 'culture' of theirs, no?I think this mindset of trying to
        map everything 1:1 to humans might be robbing us of a
        greater understanding of the universe in general, like
        looking at planets that have water and an atmosphere of
        some kind as with probably having life. There is no need
        for other kinds of life to need water or oxygen per se, so
        why we seem to be focused almost exclusively on it?
 
Xcelerate - 8 hours ago
As someone who isn't a vegetarian (and who feels guilty eating
bacon if I start thinking about it too much), I can't help but to
wonder if eating meat will be considered the "barbaric" practice of
this generation for future generations.  I'm sure previous
generations didn't consider their barbaric practices to be such at
the time.
 
  pier25 - 6 hours ago
  I find that being a vegetarian for moral reasons is quite
  delusional.We, humans, are inflicting much more suffering to
  flora and fauna by the simple fact of participating in the
  industrial modern lifestyle. Buying food at the supermarket,
  using the internet, travelling, AC, and pretty much any activity
  we can think of.The underlying problem is that to sustain 7+
  billion people we need industrialisation which requires massive
  amounts of resources (energy, land, minerals, etc). The modern
  lifestyle doesn't help either.
 
    soared - 6 hours ago
    Well except that meat is a much larger factor in global warming
    than anything else in our diet. You can't just choose to not
    participate in modern industrial life, but you can easily
    choose to not eat
    meat.https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/21/eat-
    less...
 
      pier25 - 2 hours ago
      The hard truth is that energy consumption is the biggest
      factor in global warning.The second one is deforestation.The
      third one is industry.https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions
      /global-greenhouse-gas-emiss...
 
    grossvogel - 6 hours ago
    Just because it's not enough doesn't mean it's delusional.I'm a
    vegetarian partly out of compassion for the animals who might
    be eaten and partly because of the other harmful effects of
    industrialized meat production.In addition, I don't own a car
    and try to avoid non-human-powered transportation in general, I
    use air conditioning extremely sparingly despite living in
    Louisiana, I avoid buying crap I don't need online or in
    person, and I choose my foods and their sources carefully.These
    are all personal choices, and I'm sharing them not to lecture
    or to be holier than thou. I'm just trying to say this: Maybe
    the correct reaction to "being a vegetarian alone won't save
    the world," is "I should be thoughtful about all the ways my
    choices impact the world" rather than "I'll have the 72oz
    steak."
 
      pier25 - 2 hours ago
      No offense, but the hard reality is that those things don't
      have much of an impact in emissions.I was like you a few
      years ago. Even left the world  and moved to an off the grid
      cabin for a year until I realized I was only trying to feel
      better about myself.Me installing some solar panels on that
      cabin: http://imgur.com/5mfDVHv.jpgEverything that we do,
      like using the internet, is still consuming massive amounts
      of energy and resources. From manufacturing the computer(s)
      you are using, to networking.Energy consumption for example
      is the number one cause of CO2 emissions, not transportation,
      and certainly not the food
      industry.https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/global-greenhouse-
      gas-emiss...
 
    pmoriarty - 4 hours ago
    "I find that being a vegetarian for moral reasons is quite
    delusional.  We, humans, are inflicting much more suffering to
    flora and fauna by the simple fact of participating in the
    industrial modern lifestyle."If one can't save everything, one
    must save nothing?
 
      pier25 - 2 hours ago
      Depends on the impact.Are we saving 1%, 10%, or 30%?Because
      if we are saving 1% we are being delusional.
 
    cryodesign - 4 hours ago
    You are right, farming could be more sustainable and less
    destructive (see vertical farm, aeroponics etc).But it's been
    proven that producing meat requires more resources than
    producing plant based foods. So if we truly care about feeding
    7+ billion people, then we would reduce our meat consumption or
    move to a plant based diet completely. This is one thing each
    of us can directly do something about - by simply buying
    different foods. You should watch that presentation by Beyond
    Meat founder Ethan Brown.Also, when talking about moral
    reasons, this is not just about minimising the suffering of
    animals. What do you think seeing animals being killed, sliced
    open alive etc day in day out does to the human psyche - you
    can find out here:
    http://scholar.colorado.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2157...
    - also see this quote [1].If you couldn't get any other job
    other than working in a slaughterhouse or food prep shop and
    they both pay the same - which job would you pick? Would you
    want to kill animals every day or rather wash, cut, peel fruits
    and veg every day?Our buying choices do matter.[1] "The worst
    thing, worse than the physical danger is the emotional toll. If
    you work in that stick pit for any period of time, you develop
    an attitude that lets you kill things, but doesn?t let you
    care. You may look a hog in the eye that?s walking around down
    in the blood pit with you and think, God, that really isn?t a
    badlooking animal. You may want to pet it. Pigs down on the
    kill floor have come up and nuzzled me like a puppy. Two
    minutes later I had to kill them-beat them to death with a
    pipe. I can?t care (Dillard, p. 398, 2008). "
 
      pier25 - 2 hours ago
      > But it's been proven that producing meat requires more
      resources than producing plant based foodsIt's true, but you
      can see the global sources of emissions
      here.https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/global-greenhouse-gas-
      emiss...As I hope you can see we have bigger problems to
      worry about.> What do you think seeing animals being killed,
      sliced open alive etc day in day out does to the human
      psycheMy grandparents killed animals on their farm regularly.
      Not only they were good moral people, but their way of life
      was much more sustainable and respectful of the planet than
      any of us here.By focusing on something that shocks you
      personally you are missing the whole picture.
 
        cryodesign - 1 hours ago
        Thanks for that link. I'll have a look.But why can't we act
        on multiple fronts? We can do many things to reduce our
        carbon foot print, and choosing not to eat meat or reducing
        it is one of those things.Our meat consumption is a big
        problem environmentally - see
        https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/meat-and-
        environm...Also, the way we farm animals now a days is
        completely different to when your grand parents farmed
        them. Using factory farming to feed the world is just not
        sustainable.Look, I get it - most people can't give up
        meat, we're addicted to it and it's also cultural. But what
        we can do is giving a signal to the market that we demand
        better, by choosing to buy alternatives that are better on
        many fronts, like Beyond Meat etc.That's why I really
        admire the work by Ethan Brown, he's trying to create meat
        using plant protein. You should watch the presentation by
        him I posted earlier - you might find it interesting.
 
  doomslay - 7 hours ago
  God I hope not. People are already ridiculously detached from
  nature, we don't need to go even further away from nature.I think
  there is a real movement and push back against all this political
  correctness and endless 'feelings' based discussion thankfully.
 
  gregcrv - 7 hours ago
  Some cultures considered the practice of eating animals to be
  barbaric already more than 2000 years
  ago.https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_vegetarianism
 
  newscracker - 7 hours ago
  You might enjoy watching this comedy mockumentary titled
  "Carnage". [1] It was available on Vimeo for free, but am unable
  to find the link.[1]:
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnage_(2017_film)
 
  cryodesign - 7 hours ago
  I think it will be. People of the future will look at this time
  the same way we look back to when it was accepted to have human
  slaves.Medicine (and millions of other people) has already proven
  that we don't need meat to survive. We have plenty of
  alternatives now.But we are addicted to meat - because it gives
  us pleasure. But then you have to ask yourself, is it OK for
  sentient beings to horribly suffer for us[1], so we can
  experience some pleasure that could be easily achieved by
  consuming alternative foods[2] and shifting our perception.
  Consuming meat is also not the best way to efficiently feed the
  world.Here is what Dr Neil Barnard says about bacon:Power Foods
  for the Brain (17min)
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_ONFix_e4k[1] Earthlings -
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc2oizSsmUs (I challenge you to
  watch this and not think 'WTF')[2] Beyond Meat - great
  presentation by Ethan Brown:
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4x8jfiaLCPY
 
    pmoriarty - 4 hours ago
    "..you have to ask yourself, is it OK for sentient beings to
    horribly suffer for us, so we can experience some pleasure that
    could be easily achieved by consuming alternative foods and
    shifting our perception"One can readily see that the answer to
    this question is "yes" even when the suffering is that of
    humans, much less animals.Many people readily consume products
    that are created in sweatshops, that are the product or cause
    of wars and/or environmental damage that has severe (and often
    deadly) consequences on other humans.  Most people don't really
    care enough to change their consumption habits.Out of sight,
    out of mind is a maxim many live by both when they eat and when
    they buy.  Few people want to look in to the proverbial sausage
    factory or slaughterhouse to find out how their food is made,
    or in sweatshops to find out how their clothes are made.  May
    if they did they'd change their consumption habits, but most
    don't really want to.  They'd rather bury their head in the
    sand and enjoy their life.  As long as they or their loved ones
    don't directly suffer the consequences, they effectively
    couldn't care less how their pleasure was got.
 
    wolco - 7 hours ago
    Or we will look back at at vegans and see them as an extreme
    version of a normal healthy adult.  Much the same way we place
    healthy values on skinny people when taken to the extreme it
    becomes unhealthy and counter productive.If animals can think
    and they eat other animals perhaps they will be able to teach
    us why it may be an acceptable choice.
 
      cryodesign - 5 hours ago
      A few things:* Veganism isn't about health[1]. It's about
      avoiding exploitation of other sentient and intelligent
      beings and reducing suffering on many levels.* The difference
      between us and other animals is that we have the ability of
      critical thinking. We can change our attitude and mind when
      presented with new information. A lion can't do this (also, a
      lion needs meat to survive, modern humans don't).There is a
      great quote by Aaron Swartz[2] and in that vein I encourage
      you to watch the videos that were posted in this thread - you
      might be surprised.[1] "Veganism is a way of living which
      seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all
      forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food,
      clothing or any other purpose.[...]"[2] ?Think deeply about
      things. Don?t just go along because that?s the way things are
      or that?s what your friends say. Consider the effects,
      consider the alternatives, but most importantly, just think.?
 
        wolco - 4 hours ago
        What is your take on the morally of eating plants.  Plants
        are living creatures some would say sentient beings.
        Recent research is showing they feel pain, communicate with
        other plants.   Do they deserve the same protection?
 
          cryodesign - 4 hours ago
          Good question. Imagine plants feel pain like other
          animals and like we do. If our objective is to avoid
          suffering and environmental damage as much as possible,
          which one would you choose:1) Eat animals and plants.
          Remember the animals you eat also eat plants. This
          creates maximum suffering and damage.2) Eat plants only.
          This creates less suffering and damage than option 1.To
          answer your question though, if it's scientifically
          proven that plants are sentient and feel pain like we do
          (i.e. suffer) then I would only eat what plants produce
          (e.g. nuts, legumes, apples, etc) rather than the plant
          itself (e.g. carrots).
 
          pharrington - 3 hours ago
          If it's scientifically proven that plants are sentient
          and feel pain (I'm dropping the like conjunction because
          that's pushing it past the breaking point), you'd prefer
          keeping them alive in perpetuity to continually rip off
          their genitals over killing them outright?Personally, at
          least until we can efficiently synthesize arbitrary
          dietary proteins, fats, and fibers, I'll keep using my
          computer built from rare earths mined with exploited
          workers to post about the delicious, factory-slaughtered
          chicken I just ate.
 
          cryodesign - 2 hours ago
          Why does it have to be black or white? It's a spectrum.
          Or as pmoriarty greatly put it further down:'If one can't
          save everything, one must save nothing?'You should watch
          the presentation by Ethan Brown, he talks about creating
          meat using plant protein.He's a great entrepreneur and
          'hacker'. You might enjoy it.
 
      [deleted]
 
danielam - 8 hours ago
While the particularities may be interesting, much of what's said
isn't surprising (though for Cartesians, it may be, and the author
does throw Descartes' name around a few times). There is a great
deal of confusion about this subject and a number of philosophical
errors in the comments (w.r.t. language, religion, qualia, zombies,
etc). For those who do want some perspective, I recommend starting
with Feser's introductory book "Philosophy of Mind" [0] as well as
a series of blog posts he's written on the subject (such as [1] and
[2], as well as a blog post with a long list of links on the
subject and related subjects [3]).[0] https://www.amazon.com
/Philosophy-Beginners-Guide-Edward-Fes...[1]
http://edwardfeser.blogspot.com/2015/04/animal-souls-part-i....[2]
http://edwardfeser.blogspot.com/2012/08/animals-are-consciou...[3]
http://edwardfeser.blogspot.com/2011/05/mind-body-problem-ro...
 
  skadamou - 7 hours ago
  Boy there is a lot in Feser?s work to unpack. I haven?t gotten
  through all of the links you posted yet, but the crux of his
  argument (and evidently the argument Thomists make) is that
  humans are different because we are capable of abstract reasoning
  and logic whereas animals are not. Do you suppose animals really
  are not capable of these two mental faculties? Abstraction seems
  more difficult to dissect but it does not seem too farfetched to
  imagine that animals are capable of making future plans based on
  an understanding of cause and effect. Don?t you think that
  implies some level of logical reasoning? I know Feser?s views are
  not necessarily indicative of your own but I would appreciate
  your opinion
 
    mabub24 - 43 minutes ago
    Personally, I have not read Feser. I would recommend PMS
    Hacker's book "Human Nature: A Categorical Framework", which,
    from reading Fraser's blog posts, I see moves along similar
    lines. The philosophy of mind is a topic I'm quite interested
    in, so I think I can respond to some of your questions.> humans
    are different because we are capable of abstract reasoning and
    logic whereas animals are not. Do you suppose animals really
    are not capable of these two mental faculties?We need to ask,
    in what sense and depth are animals able to express that form
    of reasoning and logic? Humans do so at unique levels through
    language. There is a layer of reasoning and following logic
    that can be expressed by being shown by doing, like preparing,
    but there is another, higher form, that can be expressed by
    being said through language, like planning. The former is
    continually in the present. It does involve a kind of thinking
    and a kind of intelligence. But unlike the latter form, which
    expresses an understanding, and therefore the ability to
    express in language, the past and future tenses, there is no
    expression of why it is being done. That expressing of why,
    that kind of expression of reasoning, animals lack and humans
    are capable of through language.Language is not just some thing
    we slap over thought. It is an ability that, through its use,
    expresses the concepts and limits of our thoughts. It is the
    animate expression of our thinking, that is the collection of
    our rational and cogitative faculties that define us as persons
    rather than animals.It's not so much that animals lack
    reasoning or logic (that is the view of a crude Behaviorism),
    it is that humans are capable of the same and far more unique
    expressions of reasoning and logic than animals, so much so
    that humans are unique from animals as a result.
 
  _dps - 8 hours ago
  > ... a number of philosophical errors in the comments (w.r.t.
  language, religion, qualia, zombies, etc).I feel like this is,
  intentionally or not, aimed at least 80% at my comments :)Would
  you mind giving me some quick pointers on what the "errors" are?
  I can assure you that, though I may well be wrong, I have read
  several books on philosophy of mind and many more on cognitive
  science research. Despite that I'm struggling to see anything I
  said that would have been controversial at the time I was taking
  those courses in university.
 
WalterBright - 4 hours ago
I know what my cat is thinking. He's plotting to sell me to the cat
food factory.
 
  [deleted]
 
tanilama - 1 hours ago
What is the question you want to ask? I think this is a bigger
question than it presents here. We don't really know what is
thoughts actually, what is the actual representation of it. If we
don't even know what we trying to study, the conclusion might be
pretty useless.
 
  roceasta - 57 minutes ago
  Another example: we ask whether animals are 'conscious' or not,
  or we declare ex cathedra that certain animals are conscious, all
  the while without being able to explain what consciousness is, or
  what qualia are, or how these work.If we could then we'd know if
  the question made sense.I like David Deutsch's criterion for
  assessing claims about these issues: if you can't program it, you
  haven't understood it.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J21QuHrIqXg
 
leoharsha2 - 9 hours ago
No. They don't. Animals live in the moment and understand causal
relationships within time and space. They don't abstract their
thoughts and form assemblies or sciences or write histories. Though
they understand causal laws better than humans sometimes. Hence you
can't teach an animal like you would a human. But you can train an
animal. This works on habit, not on abstract thought. Both animals
and humans can be trained. Both have habit. Humans live by codes
and formulas and religions, all are related to thought,animals
don't. Man, through abstract concepts lives in the future and the
past, the animal only in the present. Man is led by error, animals
don't err. Both animals and man are susceptible to illusion. This
is how you trap an animal in the wild. You don't led him into
capture by lies or falsehood.
 
  agumonkey - 9 hours ago
  What about the team problem solving experiment ? I remember two
  monkeys improvising a distributed solution to pull ropes in the
  right order and time to get access to some food.
 
  KekDemaga - 8 hours ago
  This crow really appears to be thinking:
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZerUbHmuY04&app=desktop
 
    dispo001 - 7 hours ago
    the body language is awesome
 
    lisper - 8 hours ago
    Great apes too.http://www.neatorama.com/2007/07/05/clever-
    puzzle-solving-or...
 
    raarts - 3 hours ago
    Maybe it only appears to be, but in fact it's some animal form
    of ML. Hard to say I guess.
 
      unfunco - 52 minutes ago
      Some animal form of ML? Like? learning?
 
b6 - 9 hours ago
Whatever the thing or force is that is looking out of my eyes and
just knowing, it is also looking out through the eyes of animals,
to whatever extent possible. Of course this is non-falsifiable.
 
_dps - 10 hours ago
"No animals have all the attributes of human minds; but almost all
the attributes of human minds are found in some animal or
other"This was a fun read in general, but I think it's particularly
interesting to consider some of its implications in the context of
trends in AI (to be clear, the article has nothing to do with AI).I
think the excerpt above is rapidly becoming true for current
generation ML/AI systems (I'm leaving aside the question of qualia
[0], since we are still unclear how to evaluate that question even
for animals).To the extent the above becomes true, I think it's an
interesting contrast to the implied point behind Dijkstra's famous
"swimming submarine" analogy:"The question of whether machines can
think... is about as relevant as the question of whether submarines
can swim."The submarine "swims", but almost none of that activity
could be mapped onto how a human swims. As the structure of ML/AI
systems starts to mimic what we believe we know about the
neuroscience of the brain, the question of whether machines are
"thinking", and what that might mean about thought in general, is
very interesting.[0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qualia
 
  StavrosK - 9 hours ago
  The question, to me, is whether machines will ever have
  consciousness, or whether consciousness is just "what it feels
  like to have a cortex". We assume that machines will have
  consciousness some day, but what if we had a machine that could
  do many things as well as a human, but didn't consider itself
  "alive"?
 
    _dps - 9 hours ago
    Yes, this is closely connected to the question of qualia, and
    the concept of a "philosophical zombie" [0].On the one hand,
    naive human intuition seems to suggest that the "movie playing
    in your head" would not emerge from any number of transistors
    and wires connected to each other.On the other hand, it's not
    clear how you can argue that what goes on in our own heads is
    physically any different. So that leads you either to religion,
    or to the idea that somehow consciousness has to emerge from
    interactions of matter. And if that's the case, it raises all
    sorts of ethical questions about the creation of artifacts that
    might (some day) exhibit consciousness. And, of course, there
    are already many ethical questions about how we treat animals
    in the here-and-
    now.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophical_zombie
 
      smokeyj - 3 hours ago
      > So that leads you either to religion, or to the idea that
      somehow consciousness has to emerge from interactions of
      matter.Doesn't seem like they're mutually exclusive. I mean,
      I'm pretty confident I can interact with some matter and
      produce another human. If or how God plays a role seems to be
      the unknown factor.
 
    _jal - 8 hours ago
    A different question is whether consciousness is something
    desirable in machines. As an exercise in playing with that
    question, Peter Watts' fiction is hard to beat.As one
    distillation he presents goes, first-contact comes about
    because of our emissions being noticed. But the reason for the
    contact is the content of the messages - intelligent but not-
    conscious beings receive them, find them difficult to process
    because they are mostly self-referential silliness only a
    conscious mind could worry about, and conclude they are
    informational attacks.Maybe machines shouldn't be conscious,
    because consciousness is a waste of resources.
 
      red75prime - 2 hours ago
      Some form of awareness of its own existence is required for a
      machine to be operating efficiently. Otherwise it can plan to
      use materials of its own "brain" as an intermediate step.
 
  glenstein - 7 hours ago
  >The submarine "swims", but almost none of that activity could be
  mapped onto how a human swims.Along similar lines Hubert Dreyfus
  famously said "current claims and hopes for progress in models
  for making computers intelligent are like the belief that someone
  climbing the tree is making progress toward reaching the
  moon."The problem with this way of thinking is that the
  fundamental principle in question gets conceded like it's no big
  deal. If you grant that I can swim, that I can climb a tree, even
  an inch, you've already given me absolutely everything. Of course
  further progress will be hard, but it won't be forbidden by some
  kind of transcendent philosophical principle.So with the
  submarine example, we might "swim" differently, but we can both
  navigate through water. What would be cause for concern in the
  sense of raising some fundamental limitation would be if we
  discover that the place we want to go simple isn't accessible by
  any "submarine" we could ever build, or that the place we want to
  go isn't to be found in the "water."
 
  agumonkey - 9 hours ago
  I prefer to re root the question into primitive (as in
  thermodynamically) survival. Everything in our system inherited
  millions of years of response to chaos and sustaining self
  structure. Machines are thinking already, above average person
  logical ability. The issue is elsewhere. All we do, even logical
  processes emerged from that legacy of survival. That's where I
  draw a line between animal life forms (including us) and
  machines, even advanced ones.
 
Koshkin - 3 hours ago
What if, on the outside, thinking is a unitary process, similar to
(but not the same as) processes in quantum mechanics. When you
observe a result (of someone's mental process; e.g. the dog ended
up biting you), you could say "oh, I know what you were thinking",
but all you know is in fact the current state of their mind, and,
just like in a quantum mechanics, that state will persist (the dog
will keep trying to bite you) unless you give it (the process) some
time to become unitary again. After that, a new observation may
yield a different result.
 
monktastic1 - 7 hours ago
For some reason I am reminded of this section from Sam Harris's
Waking Up:See if you can stop thinking for the next sixty seconds.
You can notice your breath, or listen to the birds, but do not let
your attention be carried away by thought, any thought, even for an
instant. Put down this book, and give it a try.Some of you will be
so distracted by thought as to imagine that you succeeded. In fact,
beginning meditators often think that they are able to concentrate
on a single object, such as the breath, for minutes at a time, only
to report after days or weeks of intensive practice that their
attention is now carried away by thought every few seconds. This is
actually progress. It takes a certain degree of concentration to
even notice how distracted you are. Even if your life depended on
it, you could not spend a full minute free of thought.The vast
majority of us do not even know what we are thinking. I'm not sure
there's much correlation with intelligence, either. If this sounds
absurd to you, I can only recommend you try out meditation for a
while until you see how disconcertingly true it is.One day I hope
the Economist publishes:Can we know what we are thinking?The inner
lives of our species may be a lot richer than science once thought
 
  remir - 3 hours ago
  It is quite shocking to realize that we're not the owners of the
  thoughts inside our mind, even the thoughts beginning with "I"
  ("I'm stupid", "Oh shit I will be late!", "I hate this fucking
  job!", etc).We identify with these thoughts, believing we are
  their originator, but it's the biggest illusion of all.
 
    gaius - 2 hours ago
    Are you referring to bicameralism?
 
      remir - 47 minutes ago
      I'm only referring to my own experience.
 
nthcolumn - 8 hours ago
Every day walking though the stables I give the ponies some mints.
I am fairly certain judging from their behaviors that when they see
me they are thinking 'Mints!'.One day, when I found the dog looking
excitedly down a drain I said 'Rats!'. Now if I say 'Rats?' she
goes and looks. I know she is thinking - 'I lost a rat down there
once and I'd desperately love to make its acquaintance again'.I do
not think that there is much difference between the way we and
other animals think. We get confused in the same way and even
subconscious things like 'infectious yawn' see to pass freely to
the horse and the dog and back to me. Some people have a hard time
accepting that animals do think and whereas I recognize the easy
peril of anthropomorphising subjects - I also suspect a political
unwillingness and discomfiture in accepting animal intelligence.
 
[deleted]
 
roceasta - 4 hours ago
>Chaser, a border collie, knows over 1,000 words. She can pull a
named toy from a pile of other toys. This shows that she
understands that an acoustical pattern stands for a physical
object.I don't think it quite shows this. Collies and human
toddlers use words (and are used by words) without understanding
what they're doing or what the meaning of language is. The
understanding comes later, growing over time as we attempt to
explain our behaviour to ourselves. (Including reading what other
people have to say about language.)
 
  auggierose - 3 hours ago
  You are confusing different meanings of the word "understanding"
  here. I am sure you too understand many things intuitively that
  you don't understand in a reflected way.
 
    roceasta - 3 hours ago
    Here is the sense I mean to convey. When a fridge light comes
    on, does the fridge 'understand' anything? Does it know
    anything? No, the process is just automatic.Objects such as
    books can contain knowledge without understanding anything
    because they don't have minds. The design of the fridge
    embodies knowledge about human needs, for example the need to
    hand-select food accurately at night. However there is neither
    understanding nor intuition anywhere inside that cold box about
    the relationship between the door opening and the light coming
    on.Similarly, words, which are a type of meme (the type that
    can be pronounced) can exploit brains to make copies of
    themselves, without any understanding of this going on in those
    same brains.Btw, none of this implies that animals can't think,
    or don't have minds, or that we shouldn't honour them. Actually
    I honour my fridge too...