GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-25) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
What do you get if you publish a paper in a highly-ranked journal?
83 points by ilamont
http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2017/08/25/publish...
___________________________________________________________________
 
s0rce - 6 hours ago
I published in Science and Nature during my PhD and other than some
prestige and help getting a fellowship I never received any sort of
direct payout. I don't think my supervisor got anything directly
either, definitely helped future grant applications, however.
 
  cryoshon - 5 hours ago
  >I published in Science and Nature during my PhDyou have my
  admiration twice, then.it doesn't count for much from me to you,
  i know.but improving the human body of knowledge is, in a wide
  sense, its own reward.
 
    [deleted]
 
  projectramo - 3 hours ago
  When I was in grad school, you were sent to the front of the line
  when applying for tenure track positions. (If you got a paper or
  two into those two publications).However, people still had to
  like you in the interview and job talk.
 
    s0rce - 3 hours ago
    I applied, gave up, just didn't feel like it was all worth it
    in the end and now work in industry.
 
      subroutine - 3 hours ago
      I'm assuming these were not 1st author publications. If you
      have a 1st author Nature and a 1st author Science paper
      during grad school, Universities should be rolling out the
      red carpet.
 
        Ultimatt - 2 hours ago
        So? The actual career is still not worth it. That what you
        just said is true is almost the worst part about it!
 
          subroutine - 2 hours ago
          Not worth it in what regard?
 
        s0rce - 2 hours ago
        They were both first author, details are on my very out of
        date website link in my profile if you are interested.
        Definitely no red carpet rolling out, not sure if you are
        in academia but those days have passed. Could I possibly
        have done another postdoc and managed a faculty position
        somewhere in the USA, probably, was it worth it to me,
        nope. Felt like I failed for a while, its hard to escape
        from the academia cult.
 
          subroutine - 1 hours ago
          Whoa. Well first congrats, that is a triumphant feat for
          a grad student.I am truly surprised your faculty search
          wasnt more fruitful, given there is hardly much more you
          could have done other than maybe secure a K99 grant.Why
          do you suspect your cv was not top-tier competetive? I
          ask because yes, I am in Academia and from my experience
          (including being on faculty search committees) suggests
          you would have at least been invited to job talks.
 
notyourday - 5 hours ago
Paper copy of the journal. Authors go absolutely apoplectic if they
don't get the paper copy mailed to them.[Source: Pillow talk]
 
  s0rce - 3 hours ago
  I ordered extra hard-copies for my mom and grandmother, I think
  they cared more about the papers in Nature/Science then anyone
  else.
 
    sndean - 2 hours ago
    Yeah, I was 2nd author on a Nature paper. The only person that
    cared was my mom.
 
  xioxox - 2 hours ago
  I didn't get one for a first-author Science paper, but got them
  for co-authored Nature papers.
 
    notyourday - 2 hours ago
    I am pretty sure that means production editor messed up or
    someone else in your department got your copy.
 
asdffdsa321 - 1 hours ago
An interview at google?
 
[deleted]
 
icelancer - 1 hours ago
I live in this field now. I refuse to publish in so-called "highly-
ranked journals" that take 3-6 months to find peers to review and
referee your work, drag their feet, and basically amount to a
ridiculous group of cronies that guard the gates of "science."I've
talked about it before on HN but I will only publish to open access
and open data (most important) journals that require all data be
scrubbed of PII and published alongside the paper for replication
purposes. I highly favor journals that not only allow, but
encourage replication (yes, many elite journals cite "novelty" as a
top factor regarding publication decisions... embarrassing).Science
should be freely available, open access, open data, and replicable.
Otherwise it isn't science. It's primarily garbage that exists to
advance the careers and egos of a select few.
 
  avip - 31 minutes ago
  Don't forget code! "we then used our in-house untested code,
  developed by an undergrad we scrapped from Biology, to normalize
  the results. The code is comfortably not attached"
 
  osrec - 1 hours ago
  Completely agree with you. I find it especially annoying when
  research funded by tax payers' money is not made freely
  available.
 
bantersaurus - 5 hours ago
Street cred
 
amelius - 1 hours ago
So I suppose it's often better to turn your idea into a company
instead.
 
abfan1127 - 5 hours ago
high fives.
 
moh_maya - 5 hours ago
1) For assistant professors, a better chance of tenure2) Grants!3)
becomes easier to attract good postdocs, which helps you publish
good papers faster, which helps...4) Grad students
 
kazinator - 5 hours ago
If your roommate is Shelly Cooper, you get a sticker!Possibly one
depicting a kitten which says, "me-wow!"
 
joshvm - 6 hours ago
Certainly not directly, but in most universities publication output
is the main driver for salary negotation (and advancement on tenure
track). Most places will put you on a standard scale which
increments each year, and having a top tier publication may be
enough to negotiate a bump of a couple of rungs (worth a thousand
or two pa in the UK).I would imagine the same applies to most jobs
- rather than an on-the-spot bonus, if you published in a
prestigious journal as part of your job, it would be strong grounds
for some compensation at your next review.
 
vixen99 - 5 hours ago
A lot of action on SciHub
 
paulpauper - 5 hours ago
It means a lot of status and prestige on Reddit and other 'smart'
communities, especially if the paper is in a STEM subject. Outside
of academia and offline, very little.
 
neurothrow - 4 hours ago
A scientist once apologized for being a jerk to me at a meeting the
previous year, after research that I presented there was published
in a highly-ranked journal. Oddly, I didn't even remember the
incident in question, but the change in opinion, apparently just
because of the publication venue has stuck with me for a long time.
 
jstandard - 1 hours ago
How does intellectual property work for published research based on
approaches developed while consulting for a company?For example,
let's say you develop a novel modeling methodology for a company
who hired you. You'd like to publish the methodology and give
conference talks on it. Since you're hired, your work and the
methodology would belong to the company as their asset.Are there
certain types of licenses applicable here? How about in the case of
the article where researchers are compensated for presenting a talk
on that methodology?
 
  icelancer - 46 minutes ago
  >>How does intellectual property work for published research
  based on approaches developed while consulting for a company?This
  is negotiable upfront for industrial research positions. You
  should always review your IP contract inside your job offer
  packet and battle HR/management hard on the rights to the IP and
  compensation surrounding it. Most boilerplate language assigns
  all IP rights to the company you work for with a maximum of $1
  consideration paid for your work (to satisfy contract law if it
  is ever argued in a court), with acknowledgements or minor credit
  to you in the official documentation.Needless to say, you
  shouldn't blindly agree to that unless your base salary is
  commensurate with such a loss of control and future rights of
  your work.
 
Vinnl - 4 hours ago
In addition to providing more incentive for manipulation of result
and flashy research, it also rewards researchers not for the
contents of their research, but for where they manage to get it
published. Especially the "top tier" journals place emphasis on
noteworthiness, disincentivising e.g. replication studies, and
often with a higher number of retractions [1].It also means that
the position of the traditional, subscription-based journals are
cemented more, even though many funders are also aiming to
transition to open access publishing.So overall, I guess I'm not
that enthusiastic about this.[1] https://www.nature.com/news/why-
high-profile-journals-have-m...
 
[deleted]
 
knolan - 5 hours ago
You'll get asked to review more papers.
 
robotresearcher - 4 hours ago
Suggest a title change, since almost none of the comments address
the contents of the article.E.g. "Large cash bounties paid for
highly-ranked journal articles in China and other Asian and middle
eastern countries".Most comments are answering the question by
stating the traditional reward. The article is about how very
different rewards are appearing.
 
  joe_the_user - 1 hours ago
  Well then let me bite on the question of the problem with such
  high payouts."The next question is whether there?s anything wrong
  with this idea, and if so, what. It makes me uncomfortable, but
  that?s not the appropriate measure. As long as the journals
  themselves keep up their editorial standards, the main effect
  would seem to be that their editorial staffs must get an awful
  lot of China-derived manuscripts whose authors are hoping to get
  lucky."Well, I'd offer that this analysis ignores how science has
  historically worked.Essentially, science has involved something
  like a "club" of individuals who can be trusted to make a sincere
  effort to find the true. Certainly, the use of exact instruments
  and the theoretical reproducibility of experiments were important
  but also dealing with individuals are reliable, systematic and
  trustworthy was an important thing.Which is to say that science
  journals aren't designed to filter out articles which are wholly
  fraudulent, a tissue of lies cleverly created to mimic an actual
  scientific breakthrough. With a clever enough person, naturally,
  there is no way to see fraud from the article, one would have to
  lab at the laboratory, attempt to reproduce the experiment and
  so-forth (and reproducibility was the key historically, most
  experiments weren't actually reproduced and no journal is going
  to maintain a lab to reproduce submitted articles - except
  perhaps in CS where a program might submittable).And there you
  have it. The lab coated scientist is a movie character but be
  scientist, as least once, was more than to engage in some
  activities. It was to be part of the "broad march of progress"
  where the lesser-scientist still helped move things forward by
  small, honest iterations of basic research (and this "club"
  arguably was disproportionately and unfairly white, male and
  first-world but every process has its weaknesses).A move which
  makes the pursuit of science a purely adversarial affair, by
  consigning poor performs to absolute poverty and giving fairly
  vast rewards to good performs is going to break the club
  everywhere.And the implications of the end of science as an
  idealist pursuit vary from field to field. Fraud in CS or math
  might be impossible or might be rendered impossible with suitable
  measures. But in social sciences or other fields, things could
  get nasty indeed.
 
    Retric - 1 hours ago
    In practice math papers are basically arguments for something.
    It's possible to make a bad faith argument by ignoring that A
    does not imply B and just hopping nobody notices.  You can even
    structure thing to be intentionally  misleading.Honestly, I
    suspect people fudge thing in math more than you might think.
 
quickben - 4 hours ago
If you are not planning a career in academia, wouldnt it be better
to patent it?Just wondering...
 
  KGIII - 4 hours ago
  Not everything can be patented and some folks have ethical
  concerns about keeping research open. Not to mention, you pretty
  much have to publish once you get into grad school.If you're
  going for your Ph.D. then your goal is to further the art.
 
  santaclaus - 4 hours ago
  They aren't mutually exclusive. As a researcher/engineer,
  whenever we publish in a top tier journal the company usually
  files for patents on the main contribution too.
 
  PeterisP - 3 hours ago
  Most research is not patentable.Technical development and design
  that results in some "method and apparatus" to do a particular
  thing is patentable, but the research required before that R&D
  that leads to understand how stuff works and what might work is
  not patentable. And that's not speaking about less technical
  fields of science where nothing is patentable, or computer
  science which is not patentable in much of the world (software
  patents aren't valid in EU and other places).Also, patenting is
  expensive. Especially because you need to file a patent in
  multiple major markets, you need multiple different patent
  lawyers, if you're outside of USA then filing a patent in USA is
  a bit of a hassle, and just for USA+main EU countries gets quite
  costly quick - so that's a reason not to patent things unless you
  have a clear picture that some product is going to violate that
  patent and thus it'll become valuable.
 
    santaclaus - 1 hours ago
    > Most research is not patentable.In my experience, the lawyers
    just chuck 'A System for' in front of the paper's title and
    open the firehose at the patent office. Lots of ridiculous
    stuff gets through...
 
Animats - 3 hours ago
25 free reprint copies?
 
efficax - 5 hours ago
In addition to the prestige and career boost, you get a a really
swell awesome feeling and get to be a permanent part of the
encylopedia of knowledge. You're in libraries now!
 
  moh_maya - 5 hours ago
  That happens if you publish in any indexed journals. Perhaps more
  people will see your name if you publish in a higher profile
  journal, but that is also not a certainly (though highly
  probable)..
 
  upvotinglurker - 5 hours ago
  Many libraries only have online subscriptions to these journals
  nowadays...
 
  azag0 - 4 hours ago
  In chemical physics, many of the most influential papers (tens of
  thousands of citations) have been published in The Journal of
  Chemical Physics, an absolutely non-flashy publication with
  impact factor ~3 and a myriad of uninteresting papers.