GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-25) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Mental processes of chess masters revealed how people become
experts (2016) [pdf]
90 points by lainon
http://web.cecs.pdx.edu/~tymerski/ece101/Expert_mind_scientifica...
ientificamerican0806-64.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
 
adrice727 - 1 hours ago
One of the books that has had the biggest influence in my life is
"The Art of Learning" by Josh Waitzkin, the child chess prodigy of
"Searching for Bobby Fischer" fame.https://www.amazon.com/Art-
Learning-Journey-Optimal-Performa...
 
jonmc12 - 3 hours ago
Related - "Deliberate Practice and Performance in Music, Games,
Sports, Education, and Professions: A Meta-Analysis" -
http://scottbarrykaufman.com/wp-
content/uploads/2014/07/Macn...Gives some context for the kinds of
fields where deliberate practice improves performance.
 
  GregBuchholz - 1 hours ago
  Your mention of deliberate practice prompted me reinvestigate the
  guy who was doing the 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to
  become a golf pro.  Unfortunately, from what I can tell, he did
  get to 10,000 hours, but it doesn't seem like it panned out.
  Anyone have further sources of information?http://thedanplan.com/
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_McLaughlin_(golfer)
 
    tunesmith - 1 hours ago
    There was a recent HN discussion on it, I believe - I think he
    got to around 6,000 hours, and was doing really well at golf
    actually, but then injuries started happening.
 
      brianwawok - 1 hours ago
      Maybe a slightly different topic.. but from what a lot in the
      running field think, its all about how fast your body
      recovers.There are 10,000 amazing marathoners in the world.
      If you gave them all the same training, they would all be
      absurdly good, as they got better and better. But 9,990 or so
      of them would get injured and wash out.So it seems at least
      in some sports, your limiter is not how genetically gifted
      you are the SPORT, but how genetically gifted you are at
      recovering from training so that you can train more.So
      perhaps this guy has the genetics to be a pro golfer, but his
      body can't take the strain and recover between sessions.. so
      he would never quite make it.
 
        jtuente - 1 hours ago
        If his body cannot take the strain and recover between
        sessions then wouldn't that suggest that he does not have
        the genetics to be a pro golfer, but merely a good one?
 
        jinfiesto - 54 minutes ago
        I'm not convinced that the recovery is genetic (well it is,
        but that's not the point.) People give themselves
        repetitive motion injuries in music all the time. It causes
        tons of otherwise amazing musicians to wash out.It's become
        such a problem, that it's basically become the biggest
        issue the pedagogy community as a whole is actively trying
        to address. This is interesting, because there has been a
        lot of progress made in injury-preventive technique.Even in
        running, a quick Google search revealed that injury
        preventive techniques exist.So I guess, I'm not convinced
        that injury isn't technique related and that not being
        injured doesn't have more to do with luck (in terms of
        natural technique) than genetics.
 
          bsder - 2 minutes ago
          > It's become such a problem, that it's basically become
          the biggest issue the pedagogy community as a whole is
          actively trying to address. This is interesting, because
          there has been a lot of progress made in injury-
          preventive technique.Could you please give me some
          references for this?  Guitar has loads of famous people
          who encourage people to do things that will cause
          injuries.  Having some actual research to fight against
          this would be really useful.An egregiously bad example:
          Paul Gilbert (who is like 6'5" and has enormously long
          arms and fingers) actually SELLS an especially long
          guitar strap that is practically guaranteed to give you
          RSI.  I wish I were joking: https://www.youtube.com/resul
          ts?search_query=paul+gilbert+gu...Side note: this made me
          hugely disappointed in Paul Gilbert.  Prior to this, I
          thought of him as an amazing guitar player with a very
          wry/dry sense of humor who was simply making fun of the
          guitar stereotype crowd.  Actually encouraging something
          which is damaging in order to profit from it crosses the
          line whether he is serious or joking--too many people
          will listen and believe him.
 
          StanislavPetrov - moments ago
          >So I guess, I'm not convinced that injury isn't
          technique related and that not being injured doesn't have
          more to do with luck (in terms of natural technique) than
          genetics.Certainly luck is a factor, but genetics is an
          important factor as well.  Many studies have linked
          genetics to a predisposition for inflammation, wound-
          healing, and other injury-related phenomena.https://www.s
          ciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160302135149.h...https:/
          /www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16472051
 
        Trundle - 13 minutes ago
        Kind of related is that one of the biggest advantages of
        using performance enhancing drugs/steroids is the greatly
        reduced recovery time. Even if someone tests clean before
        an event because they genuinely are clean rather than being
        on something undetectable, they still benefit from all of
        the extra training they managed to get in in-between events
        when they were juicing.
 
  danharaj - 1 hours ago
  I'm having a bit of trouble interpreting these numbers.If I look
  at deliberate practice in musical proficiency amongst the general
  populace, it'll look like deliberate practice is responsible for
  almost all of the proficiency. However, if I look at the top 100
  musicians in the world, they would have all practiced thousands
  of hours and I expect practice to have diminishing returns, so it
  should be responsible for very little of the variation in their
  ability.I would expect also that in more multifactorial
  activities which are often the basis of professions that it is
  both A) difficult to ascertain what expertise is (often reducing
  to an empty social credential) B) difficult to evaluate what good
  deliberate practice is.The meta-analysis talks about such factors
  as the predictability of the environment correlating with the
  effect size of deliberate practice. I think that's just the tip
  of the iceberg.
 
jasode - 2 hours ago
Fyi... this a 2006 publication.  (Not sure why HN submission says
(2016).)Being 11 years old isn't an issue because the chess memory
observation is interesting data.  The age is significant because
virtually every pop psychology & brain book in the last 10 years
mentions this chess study as one of the anecdotes.  (Similar to how
all the pop psych books mention the Invisible Gorilla, Marshmallow
Experiment, Stanford Prison Experiment, etc)
 
  Bucephalus355 - 1 hours ago
  Hey want to provide some quick clarification on your point.First,
  you are dramatically, 110% right that pop psychology books
  plunder really valuable research such as this for ultimately
  banal insights that they manage to hide in a 300 page book that
  could be 10 pages.K. Anders Ericsson, the absolute giant in the
  field of expertise research, is quite dismissive of Malcolm
  Gladwell and upset at his mis-interpretations of his work. Go
  look at his book, "Peak", which goes into depth on this (and
  funny enough looks like every other stupid pop psychology book,
  although it is not).Finally, if you want to explore the best
  research we have from the present through the last 40 years,
  highly recommend you check out "The Cambridge Handbook of
  Expertise". It's 40 chapters written by nothing but PhDs.They
  compare what expertise means across History, Firefighting,
  Surgery, Ballet, even Truck Driving and Software Design.
 
bfung - 18 minutes ago
So...(start internal monologue)- The 10x engineer is so because of
10x practice (numbers not precise nor accurate).  Companies - need
to keep challenging people to get experts.  Bootcampers - keep
practicing.- As with the soccer study in the article, boys ended up
as the "bigger kids" in computer science and due to motivational
factors, there's more boys in the tech industry today [1]- Refutes
a large portion of [2]; did the google engineer read these studies
before?[1]
http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2014/10/21/357629765/when-...[2]
http://gizmodo.com/exclusive-heres-the-full-10-page-anti-div...
 
hellbanner - 47 minutes ago
If you want to improve this chess, I recommend this playlist by
International Master John Bartholomew:https://www.youtube.com/watch
?v=Ao9iOeK_jvU&index=5&list=PLl...I recommend https://lichess.org
over chess.com for a far superior UI.
 
  afro88 - 40 minutes ago
  Lichess is excellent. I run my in person games through it's
  analysis. They have a great feature where you practice the
  correct move where you had made a mistake or "blunder".And it's
  open source: https://github.com/ornicar/lila
 
    hellbanner - 2 minutes ago
    Open source, awesome!I'm so impressed with their UI. You can
    watch games in real time and there's a dashboard showing you
    your Ping + Server Processing Time per Move (usually 2ms).
 
  lainon - 39 minutes ago
  There's also this paper which gives a general overview on which
  aspects of the game you should focus improving on once you
  mastered the basics of chess."Training in chess: a scientific app
  roach"https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/e2dd/31c7db68667f1485f80d0
  e...
 
HappyKasper - 2 hours ago
"Talent is Overrated" is a great pop exploration of this and
similar findings. If you find this interesting, I highly recommend
that book as a jumping off point for exploring similar findings.
 
  drivers99 - 1 hours ago
  Another very good book is "Peak: Secrets from the New Science of
  Expertise" by Anders Ericsson. I'm in the middle of reading it
  now. As I suspected (since he mentions studies on chess masters),
  he's part of this article, and in fact he's the author of 2 of
  the 5 "More to Explore" sources listed at the end of the article.
 
    Bucephalus355 - 1 hours ago
    Just posted above on K. Anders Ericcson and the book Peak is
    great.Main point is the 10,000 hour rule comes from Ericcson's
    study that the best violinists in the world practice about
    7,000 hours by the time they are 18. They average between 3-4
    hours a day. This last point is really interesting because the
    ceiling for what qualified as good practice consistently was no
    more than 4 hours. So if you do 4 hours of top notch practice /
    studying, it would seem like no matter your field you are done
    for the day.Continuing on, the 10,000 hour rule was stupidly
    expanded by 3,000 hours just to make it easier to remember, and
    additionally that number is COMPLETELY ARBITRARY anyway.The
    only reason violinists practice that much is because everyone
    else is competing that hard. Old, well defined fields like
    Violin or say Chess have pretty clearly defined ways on how you
    get better, meaning the "secrets" are somewhat known. Therefore
    the only way to get better is via practice, which of course
    everyone does, which drives up these insane numbers.In other
    fields which are much newer and far less defined, expertise is
    up for grabs and there are no well-defined broadly agreed on
    ways to get better. If you do 800 hours of the "right" practice
    you can be far ahead of anyone else, since no one really knows
    what's right.That being said, Ericcson's research still shows
    lots of correlation before time and skill, so alas no easy
    shortcuts.EDIT: between time and skill
 
wslh - 2 hours ago
In the introduction I would begin telling the story of Najdorf
playing blind chess:
http://www.blindfoldchess.net/blog/2011/12/after_64_years_ne...
 
  subroutine - 2 hours ago
  Magnus has some youtube videos playing with his back to a series
  of boards, then after he wins he writes down every move that was
  played on every board.