GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-25) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
An ancient Babylonian tablet may contain the first evidence of
trigonometry
75 points by sohkamyung
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/08/ancient-babylonian-tablet...
an-tablet-may-contain-first-evidence-trigonometry
___________________________________________________________________
 
mynegation - 2 hours ago
Submitted that link earlier, probably the most detailed analysis I
have seen (with explanation of Babylonian floating point!)http://ww
w.math.ubc.ca/~cass/courses/m446-03/pl322/pl322.htm...
 
  [deleted]
 
anonymid - 34 minutes ago
I made a little activity from the demonstration given in the paper,
https://teacher.desmos.com/activitybuilder/custom/59a05b5f50...I
agree that the actual paper is way better than most press I've read
about it. (others have linked to it, but
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0315086017... )I
found the surprise appearance by Knuth super interesting!
 
rb808 - 1 hours ago
The original sin.
 
yostrovs - 2 hours ago
I thought the Arabs invented al-gebra...
 
musashizak - 1 hours ago
And vedi trigonometry? http://veda.wikidot.com/tip:ganita
 
roywiggins - 3 hours ago
One of the publicity videos for this talks about the Babylonian
base-60 system allowing them to write down fractions more
accurately than we can. This is bunk. You can't write down one-
third exactly as a base 10 decimal, but you can work with it
exactly by writing it down as 1/3. It's more laborious, and
probably the Babylonians found base-60 very useful, but given we
have obscenely powerful computers it's probably useless to us as a
practical matter.
 
  jacobolus - 2 hours ago
  Notice that nothing like our modern notation for fractions
  existed at the time (the first such notation is from India in
  ~500 CE), and calculations throughout the ancient world were done
  using mental arithmetic, finger counting, or physical
  manipulation of tokens either in piles or on some kind of
  counting board, rather than using symbolic manipulation with
  columns of written digits the way we learn in schools today.In
  particular, long division is a real pain compared to
  multiplication, so being able to use a reciprocal table to turn
  division problems into multiplication problems would have been a
  big help.* * *Here?s my Reddit comment showing a bit about how
  sexagesimal can be nice for doing exact computations with numbers
  that can be exactly reciprocated:As a simple example, 0.4 (base
  10) is a much more precise way of writing 2/5 than ~0.31 (base
  8).In base sixty you get many more divisors which result in
  terminating positional fraction expansions: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10,
  12, 15, 16, 18, 20, 24, 25, 27, 30, etc. (any number which can be
  written as powers of 2, 3, or 5)Whereas in base ten, you only
  have 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 16, 20, 25, etc.If you want to fill out a
  table of all the possible divisors between 1.0 and 2.0 which are
  ?decimally smooth? and use up to 4 decimal digits (10000
  possibilities) you get:1.0, 1.024, 1.25, 1.28, 1.5625, 1.6,
  1.6384, 2.0If you fill out a table of all the divisors between
  1:00 and 2:00 which are ?sexagesimally smooth? and use up to 2
  sexagesimal digits (3600 possibilities) you get:1:00, 1:00:45,
  1:04, 1:04:48, 1:06:40, 1:08:16, 1:12, 1:12:54, 1:15, 1:16:48,
  1:20, 1:21, 1:23:20, 1:25:20, 1:26:24, 1:30, 1:33:45, 1:36,
  1:37:12, 1:40, 1:41:15, 1:42:24, 1:44:10, 1:46:40, 1:48, 1:49:21,
  1:55:12, 2:00 (I might have missed a couple here.)As you can see
  this is a much richer set of divisors, more usefully spaced
  throughout the interval.
 
  Koshkin - 2 hours ago
  ... Except we use it all the time.
 
    Rhinobird - 2 hours ago
    Just a minute! I'll second this.
 
jacobolus - 1 hours ago
I recommend looking directly at the (apparently open access) paper,
which is in my opinion much more interesting than the various
press-release style news articles:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0315086017...Also
see the authors? (ongoing) series of Youtube video lectures about
their work and its context: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P
LIljB45xT85Aqe2b4FBWU...Here?s what page 2 of the paper says about
the paper?s contents:> We present an improved approach to the
generation and reconstruction of the table which concurs with
Britton, Proust and Shnider (2011) on the likely missing columns.
[...] We show that in principle the information on P322 is
sufficient to perform the same function as a modern trigonometric
table using only OB techniques, and we apply it to contemporary OB
questions regarding the measurements of a rectangle.> We then
exhibit the impressive mathematical power of P322 by showing that
it holds its own as a computational device even against Madhava?s
sine table from 3000 years later. This is a strong argument that
the essential purpose of P322 was indeed trigonometric: suggesting
that an OB scribe unwittingly created an effective trigonometric
table 3000 years ahead of its time is an untenable position.> [...]
Further research is required to investigate the historical and
mathematical possibilities we are suggesting. On the historical
side the question arises of how the Babylonians might have used
such a table, and we do not attempt to answer this question here.
On the mathematical side it is becoming increasingly clear that the
OB tradition of step-by-step procedures based on their concrete and
powerful arithmetical system is much richer than we formerly
imagined. Perhaps the understanding of this ancient culture can
help inspire new directions in modern mathematics and education.
 
dang - 4 hours ago
There's more at https://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/science-
tech/mathematical-..., via
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15099625.
 
  Jtsummers - 4 hours ago
  As well as:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15098189https://n
  ews.ycombinator.com/item?id=15097301https://news.ycombinator.com/
  item?id=15094190
 
rosser - 4 hours ago
> And science historian J?ran Friberg, retired from the Chalmers
University of Technology in Sweden, blasts the idea. The
Babylonians ?knew NOTHING about ratios of sides!? he wrote in an
email to Science.?When a distinguished but elderly scientist states
that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he
states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.? ?
Arthur C. Clarke
 
  kragen - 1 hours ago
  Please be aware that I haven't read the paper (http://ac.els-
  cdn.com/S0315086017300691/1-s2.0-S031508601730...), so some of
  the things I say below may be wrong.According to
  http://www.math.ubc.ca/~cass/courses/m446-03/pl322/pl322.htm...,
  the first column of the tablet is the squared ratio of two sides.
  It gives a full transcription of the base-60 fractions.  This
  squared ratio, or ratio of squares, is monotonic in both the
  ratio of the sides and the angle over the relevant interval.  It
  may be more convenient to calculate with than the raw ratio
  because it is rational when the sides in question are integers
  (or even rational), as they are in this table.From my point of
  view, the interesting thing about this is that the table is
  sorted by this first column, which means it's sorted in angle
  order.  This means that if you have a measured angle and you want
  to do some calculations about the relevant triangle, you can
  reasonably easily look up the nearest two rows in this table and
  go from there.It's true that you have to convert your angle
  measurement into this weird form of the ratio of the squares of
  two sides, essentially cos?? (or sin?? if you're thinking about
  the complementary angle).  A thing I haven't seen mentioned in
  the other comments is that the paper's second author, Wildberger,
  has spent the last 12 years trying to convince modern-day people
  that just such a ratio of squares would be a good way to measure
  angles (he calls it "spread") because, among other things, it
  allows your trigonometry theorems to apply to any field of
  characteristic >2, rather than just to ?.  He's published a book,
  founded a book publishing company to publish it, and uploaded a
  long series of foundations-of-mathematics lectures to YouTube on
  the subject, all based on a finitistic formulation of mathematics
  which has been out of fashion for a century, largely thanks to
  Hilbert's passionate advocacy of not abandoning Cantor's
  paradise.So of course Wildberger would be tremendously excited to
  discover evidence that suggests that the Babylonians were doing
  trigonometric calculations 3800 years ago using a system very
  similar to the one he is advocating today.And, in a sense,
  Friberg would be precisely correct???the tablet contains no
  ratios of side lengths, only ratios of "quadrances", in
  Wildberger's terminology.
 
    jacobolus - 1 hours ago
    > Friberg would be precisely correct???the tablet contains no
    ratios of side lengths, only ratios of "quadrances"Haha.
    Someone should email him to say so. :-P