GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-23) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
A Thorium-Salt Reactor Has Fired Up for the First Time in Four
Decades
178 points by jseliger
http://www.thoriumenergyworld.com/news/finally-worlds-first-tmsr...
___________________________________________________________________
 
zmix - 17 minutes ago
As far as I know the Chinese are also putting much effort into this
type of reactor.
 
tim333 - 2 hours ago
Glad to see they are resuming research even though there remain
problems with it as a commercial technology.
 
skybrian - 1 hours ago
This was apparently at the High Flux Reactor in Petten,
Netherlands.https://articles.thmsr.nl/petten-has-started-
world-s-first-t...
 
jhallenworld - 55 minutes ago
So there was a meltdown at a liquid sodium cooled reactor due to a
materials
problem:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_Reactor_ExperimentI
don't see a pump seal test in this experiment... does anyone know
if a solution to the SRE meltdown problem is known at this point?
Perhaps the LFT chemistry would not have the issue.
 
bhhaskin - 1 hours ago
Really happy to finally see some movement with Thorium. It might
not be the magic silver bullet that some people hype it up to be,
but it needs to be explored.
 
zython - 2 hours ago
I was under the impression that thorium-salt reactors have been
tried in the past and not deemed "worth" from  security and
profitability point of view.What has changed about that ?
 
  igravious - 2 hours ago
  I thought it was the other way around in fact. That they don't
  produce nuke-weapon-ready material meant that this avenue was not
  profitable from a security perspective. I may be recalling this
  incorrectly and I haven't re-checked but I think that's correct?
 
    philipkglass - 1 hours ago
    No, that is incorrect, though it has often been repeated by
    less technically informed advocates of the thorium fuel cycle.
    The vast majority of the world's commercial nuclear reactors
    are light-water-moderated pressurized water reactors or boiling
    water reactors (PWR and BWR respectively). The actual military
    origins of these light water reactors is that they were
    originally researched for submarine and ship propulsion for the
    US Navy:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-water_reactorhttps:
    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressurized_water_reactor#Hist...https:
    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling_water_reactor#Evolutio...The
    United States and other nuclear weapons states never produced
    their weapons plutonium from light water reactors. Weapons
    grade plutonium has typically been produced from uranium in
    dedicated plutonium-production reactors moderated with heavy
    water or graphite. (The United States once had a single reactor
    that also produced commercial electricity along with weapons
    plutonium, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N-Reactor, but it
    wasn't a light water reactor either.)Since uranium fueled light
    water reactors weren't used to make plutonium for weapons in
    the first place, the thorium-myth claim that commercial power
    reactors stuck with uranium so as to make weapons material is
    ridiculous. The military's early sponsorship of light water
    reactors for naval propulsion did give uranium-fueled LWRs a
    significant historical path dependency advantage. I speculate
    that thorium advocates who continue to repeat the myth about
    how uranium LWRs became dominant do so because it makes the
    dominant technology's dominance sound more sinister, hence
    thorium sound more attractive by contrast.
 
  ChuckMcM - 2 hours ago
  They have different problems that pressured water reactors and
  are not as applicable to applications that the military would
  like to use them for. So the government sponsored research labs
  that were running and experimenting with them stopped doing so
  when research funds ran out.Add to the insane risk of investing
  in anything 'nuclear' and you don't have a lot of available
  capital. That said, the Chinese who invest in research for other
  reasons seem to have been working on a number of MSRs which could
  conceivably advance the state of the art significantly.Oddly
  enough, as an American, I am looking forward to the first thing
  that China builds that "we" American's cannot because we lack
  expertise and/or technology to do so.
 
    phkahler - 1 hours ago
    >> Oddly enough, as an American, I am looking forward to the
    first thing that China builds that "we" American's cannot
    because we lack expertise and/or technology to do so.Or too
    much regulation or politics to allow.
 
      mschuster91 - 1 hours ago
      > Or too much regulation or politics to allow.Or, as a
      German, too much regulation/politics to Get Shit Done.Just
      look what happened to Transrapid (maglev rail). All tech and
      IP went off to China, and we're stuck in 1980-and-earlier
      carriages for anything not an ICE or regio trains.
 
        kuschku - 1 hours ago
        > and we're stuck in 1980-and-earlier carriages for
        anything not an ICE or regio trains.Actually, the InterCity
        and EuroCity fleet was just entirely replaced.This means
        the entire fleet ? S, Region, InterCity, EuroCity,
        InterCityExpress ? is now replaced, or being replaced, with
        modern stock.
 
          ChuckMcM - 1 hours ago
          Offtopic but this means I am totally heading back to ride
          the new trains :-)
 
          kuschku - 24 minutes ago
          Here the new stock:InterCity/EuroCity: https://www.bahn.d
          e/p/view/service/zug/fahrzeuge/ic_2.shtmlInterCityExpress
          4 (to replace major InterCity routes, and minor
          InterCityExpress routes): http://www.deutschebahn.com/de/
          bahnwelt/start_ice4/das_proje...
 
      ChuckMcM - 1 hours ago
      Exactly right. The one that came in conversation waiting for
      the eclipse was genetic editing of fetuses to eliminate
      inherited disease. Setting aside the whole 'designer babies'
      as a distraction imagine a company that give free genetic
      treatment for couples seeking to avoid passing on known bad
      genes. When you walk that forward and look at the cost
      associated with treating, diagnosing, and supporting people
      that later get the disease, you begin to see a huge economic
      'win' by giving them free genetic help early.
 
        troygoode - 1 hours ago
        Why would you expect that treatment to be free?
 
          theptip - 1 hours ago
          If the cost of editing is not exorbitant (i.e. is lower
          than the average per-capita cost of paying for the
          condition being edited away), healthcare providers would
          be incentivized to pay for the editing to reduce their
          costs.The incentives are obviously stronger in single-
          payer countries, but even in the US you could imagine an
          insurance company that competed on lower premiums
          conditional upon certain gene edits being applied to
          covered children.
 
          chrisallenlane - 33 minutes ago
          > in the US you could imagine an insurance company that
          competed on lower premiums conditional upon certain gene
          edits being applied to covered children.On one hand, this
          sounds entirely economically reasonable (and even
          humanitarian).On the other hand, I fear this would
          inevitably produce unintended consequences that would
          shape our society in distopian, sci-fi/horror-flavored
          ways.I have no idea how it would actually shake out.
          Maybe I'm just being anti-intellectual here.
 
          ChuckMcM - 1 hours ago
          Expect is perhaps too strong a word, the calculus would
          be the cost burden of providing services and treating the
          diseases in the uninsured  to the cost of providing the
          genetic services at the start.
 
dabockster - 42 minutes ago
> charged particles traveling faster than the speed of light in
waterWhat did I just read?
 
  lumberjack - 39 minutes ago
  Speed of light in water is slower than speed of light in vacuum
 
  mgsouth - 38 minutes ago
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_radiationThe particles
  are still moving slower than Relativity's limit, the speed of
  light in a vacuum.
 
  toufka - 37 minutes ago
  Cherenkov Radiation [1].  It's not because the particles are
  going faster than 300M m/s, but because light in the medium is
  going less than 300M m/s.  The unbreakable "speed of light" is
  actually, the "speed of light (in a vacuum)".  Outside of a
  vacuum, the light is slowed by the materials it travels through
  (see prisms, angles of refraction, Snell's Law [2] etc.).  But
  it's still a very special condition when the medium slows light
  to some large fraction of C, while particles are going faster
  than that (but still less than C).[1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_radiation[2]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snell%27s_law
 
  mhluongo - 36 minutes ago
  That phrase can be parsed in two ways
 
    hexane360 - 2 minutes ago
    To the downvoters: This is technically correct.#1: (charged
    particles traveling faster than the speed of light) in water#2:
    charged particles traveling faster than (the speed of light in
    water)
 
ChuckMcM - 2 hours ago
A couple of comments;First it is really awesome to see actual
research experiments being done on the materials. This is a
critical first step in understanding the underlying complexity of
the problems and as the article points out it is really helpful to
have a regulatory agency that is open to trying new things.The
second is this isn't a 'Thorium-Salt Reactor' it is 'parts that
would go into parts that would make up such a reactor if the
experiments indicate they will work.' A much less clickbaitey
headline but such is 21st century journalism.
 
velodrome - 2 hours ago
This technology, if viable, could help solve our current nuclear
waste problem. Valuable materials could be recycled (by separation)
for additional use.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_reprocessi
ng#Pyroproce...https://youtu.be/oAVCaUonrbE?t=12m7s
 
genzoman - 3 hours ago
very excited about this tech, but i think it will be regulated to
death.
 
  tossandturn - 3 hours ago
  You are aware of the current U.S. President and the current EPA
  Administrator, right?
 
    davrosthedalek - 3 hours ago
    Not so sure about that. Might risk these billions of coal jobs
    he created...
 
      WillPostForFood - 1 hours ago
      ?We will begin to revive and expand our nuclear energy
      sector, which I?m so happy about, which produces clean,
      renewable and emissions-free energy,? Trump
      said.https://www.nei.org/News-Media/News/News-
      Archives/2017/Trump...
 
        FireBeyond - 1 hours ago
        ?We?ve already eliminated a devastating, anti-coal
        regulation, but that was just the beginning,? he said. ?My
        administration is putting an end to the war on coal, going
        to have clean coal, really clean coal.??We will produce
        American coal to power American industry.?
 
      PaulHoule - 2 hours ago
      Also those two do not believe in global warming.  (One thing
      nuclear does not cause)It make take a long time for thorium
      reactors to come online but it is hard to believe anybody is
      going to fund the construction of a new large LWR anywhere
      outside China.
 
        mschuster91 - 1 hours ago
        > (One thing nuclear does not cause)However, two problems
        remain:1) where to get the raw material? African mines are
        not exactly known for adhering to human or environmental
        rights, also African mines, by nature of being in Africa,
        don't create American jobs. Same is valid for the other
        major sources of nuclear fuel, all of which aren't the
        USA.2) where to dump all the nuclear waste? I mean, people
        have debated to put in the most long-living and nasty stuff
        into special reactors to get it split up to less harmful
        stuff, but to my knowledge this has never been realized -
        and NIMBYs are highly afraid of a rad-waste dump near their
        houses, across the world. Also, no one has shown how to
        build something that can last over ten thousands of years
        while still protecting the rad waste.
 
          PaulHoule - 1 hours ago
          The use of thorium in the MSR is perhaps 30x more fuel
          efficient than the current light water reactor.  Large
          amounts of thorium have been buried in the desert by the
          U.S. government.  Also,  sufficient deposits exist in the
          U.S. to support centuries of use.As for nuclear waste,
          the real reason why the problem appears intractable is
          that nuclear waste is not waste.The LWR gets only 2% or
          so of the energy in uranium,  the same fuel could be
          reprocessed and used in fast breeder reactors to release
          the other 98%.  In fact,  it is the presence of plutonium
          and other actinides in spent fuel that requires
          environmental isolation beyond 500 years or so.  If we
          use those actinides as fuel,  they do not need to be
          buried,  and if we do that,  the volume of waste is
          vastly reduced along with the half-life.The fast
          breeder/reprocessing route has not been commercialized as
          of yet for a number of reasons.  Probably the most
          discussed is that plutonium, neptunium and other
          actinides useful for nuclear weaponry could be nicked
          from the reprocessing plant.The thorium MSR is an
          alternate path to a breeder,  aka a "thermal breeder".
          In the case of the MSR,  the reprocessing is done online
          or nearline to the reactor.  It is also possible to do
          thermal breeding with thorium with a modified version of
          the light water reactor.  Reprocessing that is a bitch
          though...The most immediate problem facing the industry
          is an inability to say "it is going to take X years and Y
          dollars to build a reactor" and then finish it somewhere
          near on schedule and on budget.  Being over 10% would be
          no scandal,  but it is still looking more like 10x than
          10%.
 
        moonbug - 1 hours ago
        Hinkley C
 
        roceasta - 1 hours ago
        Great that thorium is progressing. I predict the debate
        about global warming will disappear once we have new power
        sources in place. Those who denied global warming will
        suddenly acknowledge it; those who berated the deniers will
        move on to other issues.
 
          warmwaffles - 1 hours ago
          You have way too much hope for the internet to not shit
          post.
 
PaulHoule - 2 hours ago
I am surprised they are using stainless steel instead of Hastelloy-
Nhttp://www.haynesintl.com/alloys/alloy-portfolio_/Corrosion-...The
Hastelloy family of super alloys is basically stainless steel
without the steel and was proven in the Oak Ridge MSR experiment.
 
  igravious - 2 hours ago
  Maybe because of the short duration of the tests? Longer term
  they may use more exotic compounds?
 
  microcolonel - 2 hours ago
  I suspect it would be comparatively more expensive to build it
  out of proprietary nickel alloy; especially considering this
  reactor will not be in service long enough for embrittlement to
  matter.
 
  hencq - 1 hours ago
  They address that right?> The idea is to stick to standard
  materials wherever possible and therefore the tubes are made of
  ordinary stainless steel. The suitability of steel remains to be
  determined. Corrosion may be a problem, and it is not yet know if
  it can be controlled by managing the salt chemistry. The high
  temperatures in MSRs might also be problematic, even if the
  pressure inside the system is low.And> For SALIENT-02, a
  different material mixture will be used that contains beryllium,
  forming a mixture also known as FliBe. Further experiments will
  focus more on the interaction between the salt and the
  containment materials. Corrosion resistance is very important for
  those materials: they should be mechanically strong, and able to
  resist chemical corrosion and intense radiation. This corrosion
  resistance will be the next focus of the experiments with tests
  for 316 stainless steel, Hastelloy, the nickel alloy that ORNL
  used in the 1960s, and TZM ?  a titanium/zirconium/molybdenum
  alloy. Molybdenum has the potential to neutronically be much more
  attractive but there is no history of testing it at these
  temperatures.
 
SubiculumCode - 32 minutes ago
Anyone with insight on this I read years ago:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/a11907/is-the...I
worry that that if Thorium reactors become very very common because
they are thought to be very safe (e.g. behind your house common, as
some have bragged), but they turn out to be dangerous...we will
have a real problem.
 
  hexane360 - 4 minutes ago
  I'm not sure if this is a real possibility given our current
  understanding of nuclear physics and reactor design. We have
  enough knowledge to fully understand how a reactor like this
  would function. Past incidents have been caused by design flaws
  that were known at the time. It's not a matter of lack of
  knowledge so much as a lack of good management and regulations.
 
  jopsen - 3 minutes ago
  I think it's unlikely that we'll want to have people playing with
  radio active waste in their backyard..We have decent electricity
  grids, if reactors become financially viable, first goal will be
  to power the grid.I don't see any profit margin in decentralizing
  the grid.
 
nate908 - 2 hours ago
What's up with this image caption?"The inside of the Petten test
reactor where the thorium salt is being tested is shining due to
charged particles traveling faster than the speed of light in
water."As I understand it, nothing travels faster than the speed of
light. The author is mistaken, right?
 
  [deleted]
 
  lutorm - 2 hours ago
  No, it's correct. The key is the "... in water" part.
 
    mikeash - 2 hours ago
    For details, see:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_radiation
 
  DanBC - 2 hours ago
  Cherenkov radiation:
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_radiation"Speed of light"
  seems simple, but is a bit more complicated than that.
 
  xyzzyz - 2 hours ago
  Nothing travels faster than the speed of light in vacuum. Light
  is slower in other media, such as water, where its speed is only
  3/4 of its speed in vacuum. This difference in speed is
  responsible for the light refraction, for example.
 
  [deleted]
 
  logfromblammo - 2 hours ago
  Nothing travels faster than the speed of light through vacuum.But
  the index of refraction of water is 1.33 .  So the speed of light
  through water is much slower than through vacuum.  And electrons
  can travel through water faster than light through water.The
  effect is similar to a massive object traveling faster than the
  speed of sound through
  air.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_radiationEdit:  I
  love that HN is so smart that a dogpile can form from all the
  people rushing in to explain Cherenkov radiation.
 
xupybd - 1 hours ago
"The inside of the Petten test reactor where the thorium salt is
being tested is shining due to charged particles traveling faster
than the speed of light in water."What I thought that wasn't
possible? Or is this just the speed of light in water, so the
particles are still moving slower than the speed of light in a
vacuum?
 
  tomr_stargazer - 1 hours ago
  > What I thought that wasn't possible? Or is this just the speed
  of light in water, so the particles are still moving slower than
  the speed of light in a vacuum?Good question! It's the latter -
  the shining is due to Cherenkov radiation [0], "electromagnetic
  radiation emitted when a charged particle (such as an electron)
  passes through a dielectric medium at a speed greater than the
  phase velocity of light in that medium."[0]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_radiation
 
MentallyRetired - 1 hours ago
How'd you like to be the guy pressing the button for 40 years?
 
philipkglass - 3 hours ago
Better explanation here (linked from Technology Review):
http://www.thoriumenergyworld.com/news/finally-worlds-first-...More
details on the experiment sequence:
https://public.ornl.gov/conferences/MSR2016/docs/Presentatio...This
is not actually a reactor test because the thorium-bearing salt
does not attain criticality. It's a sequence of materials tests
using thorium-containing salt mixtures in small crucibles inside
the conventionally fueled High Flux Reactor
(https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/research-facility/high-flux-
reac...).The experiments rely on neutrons from the High Flux
Reactor to induce nuclear reactions in the thorium-bearing salt
mixtures. However, the experiments will be useful in validating
materials behavior for possible future molten salt reactors because
it combines realistic thermal, chemical, and radiation stresses.
 
  dang - 2 hours ago
  Ok, we'll change the url to that first link, instead of
  https://www.technologyreview.com/the-download/608712/a-thori....
  Thanks!
 
  didgeoridoo - 1 hours ago
  Comments like this are why I don't bother getting my tech &
  science news from anywhere but HN.
 
    bduerst - 17 minutes ago
    I've seen an increase in the number of NLP bots that give
    snippets, but they're far from consistently being accurate.
    Are there any services that can give you summations like this,
    kind of like the WSJ's What's News section?
 
      whimsy - 6 minutes ago
      Coverage isn't great, but these two have managed to get in to
      my bookmarks:http://thecontext.net/https://legiblenews.com/I
      seem to recall a similar weekly service for HN but I can't
      recall the name of it.
 
    [deleted]