GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-08-18) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
YouTube admits 'wrong call' over deletion of Syrian war crime
videos
153 points by jacobr
http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/youtube-admits-wrong-call-over...
___________________________________________________________________
 
RandVal30142 - 1 hours ago
Something people need to keep in mind when parsing this story is
that many of the effected channels were not about militancy, they
were local media outlets. Local outlets that only gained historical
note due to what they documented as it was unfolding.In Syria
outlets like Sham News Network have posted thousands upon thousands
of clips. Everything from stories on civilian infrastructure under
war, spots on mental health, live broadcasts of
demonstrations.Everything.Including documenting attacks as they
happen and after they have happened. Some of the effected accounts
were ones that documented the regime's early chemical weapons
attacks. These videos are literally cited in investigations.All
that is needed to get thousands upon thousands of hours of
documentation going back half a decade deleted is three
strikes.Liveleak is not a good host for such outlets because it is
not what these media outlets are about. Liveleak themselves delete
content as well so even if the outlets fit the community it would
not be a 'fix.'
 
ezoe - 1 hours ago
What I don't like about those web giant services is, to get a human
support, it requires to start social pressure like this.If they
fucked up something by automation, contacting to human support is
hopeless unless you have very influential SNS status or something.
 
itaris - 3 hours ago
I'm much a proponent of automation as anyone else. But I think
right now Google is trying to do something way too hard. By looking
for "extremist" material, they are basically trying to determine
the intention of a video. How can you expect an AI to do that?
 
  Dirlewanger - 1 hours ago
  Doesn't matter, it's already out in the wild. This year so far,
  tons of channels whose videos have had ads for years are being
  instantly demonetized without explanation. If even one word from
  a video's title, one tag is on their "controversial" shitlist,
  it's SOL. Knowing YouTube's track record with this stuff, they
  will continue to be silent and not give a shit.Content creators
  that don't produce content for 5 year-olds need to start looking
  somewhere else than YouTube.
 
    notananthem - 1 hours ago
    I mean its also youtube so .. who cares
 
      wyager - 1 hours ago
      Yes, who cares about the world's (by far) largest and most
      popular video distribution site?
 
    Fej - 1 hours ago
    YouTube is the only option. Smart businesspeople (i.e. most
    channels over 500k or even 200k subs) have alternate sources of
    revenue, mainly sponsorships but also Patreon.
 
      fao_ - 1 hours ago
      It's almost like you forgot Vimeo
 
        Fej - 17 minutes ago
        I didn't forget Vimeo. YouTube is so dominant that, since
        everyone else is on YouTube, uploading videos elsewhere is
        career suicide. No one will switch websites or apps to
        watch just one creator's content.One of the keys to
        YouTube's success is its sub feed. All the videos from all
        my favorite channels, all in one place. It's extremely
        convenient. People tend to take the path of least
        resistance.
 
        tomc1985 - 45 minutes ago
        Oh god please no
 
        Dirlewanger - 1 hours ago
        But Vimeo isn't, and doesn't want to be, YouTube.
 
  anotherbrownguy - 29 minutes ago
  The demonetization effort is too targeted and obvious to be
  explained by "AI did it". If AI did it, they could undo it after
  appeal which they don't.
 
  sbov - 3 hours ago
  The AI doesn't seem to remove them though, it just flags them for
  human review.  In theory, these humans should be the ones
  determining intent.
 
    duskwuff - 3 hours ago
    And in this case, there should probably be a separately trained
    group of reviewers to carefully examine these videos. Not the
    same group that's quickly checking over videos to see if
    they're pornographic, for instance.
 
      shallot_router - 3 hours ago
      How do you know there isn't already a separately trained
      group of reviews whose only role is to carefully examine
      videos related to war crimes/terrorism/violence? I suspect
      there was, and Google/YouTube's senior management just
      decided to take a harder line on it than they should've.
 
      mc32 - 3 hours ago
      I think most of their review ops are in Manila, PH, no?  It'd
      take some time to get them up to speed on that...
 
        vacri - 1 hours ago
        O_o
 
        jtmcmc - 1 hours ago
        the highest level are in the US
 
        TheSpiceIsLife - 1 hours ago
        Why do you believe that to be the case?
 
      ben_w - 3 hours ago
      That's certainly a first step, but I doubt it's a full
      solution. What's the phrase, "dog whistles" for phrases and
      keywords that only a target audience would understand?
 
  Raphmedia - 3 hours ago
  But is Youtube really the right platform for such videos? It's a
  platform made to host videos in order to put advertiser's ads on
  them. When I think "raw war videos", I think of Liveleak.
 
    pryelluw - 3 hours ago
    YouTube is now what TV used to be. So yes, you should be able
    to show this content. However, the platform needs to provide
    betyer tools to users and producers to aide in categorizing
    content.
 
      tree_of_item - 2 hours ago
      When did TV ever show content like this?
 
        PhasmaFelis - 1 hours ago
        I remember graphic photos of Iraqi war crime victims on the
        evening news in '91.
 
    devrandomguy - 3 hours ago
    For many users, Youtube is the only video publishing site, and
    many people get their news through YT. Very few people are
    aware of the existence of LiveLeak; it is an ineffective
    platform for spreading awareness.
 
      [deleted]
 
      tekromancr - 2 hours ago
      Agreed. I don't click liveleak links if I don't feel like
      watching someone get murdered on camera. So, basically, I
      don't click liveleak links.
 
        aaron-lebo - 2 hours ago
        Would you prefer to stumble across those on Youtube?It
        seems better that material which needs to be kept for
        history and remained uncensored due to advertising is on a
        site dedicated to that instead of a site which most people
        use for videos of recipes, memes, and great football
        headers.
 
          devrandomguy - 2 hours ago
          Yeah, there does need to be some sort of inhibition
          against highly traumatizing content, it should certainly
          not be promoted to people who do not seek it out. But
          purging news videos of statues being destroyed and
          ancient buildings being demolished, is going too far.
 
          megous - 2 hours ago
          This is a solved problem. Flag it and it will get behind
          a confirmation screen asking you if you're really sure to
          view the video.
 
  [deleted]
 
  nsxwolf - 17 minutes ago
  Basically every YouTuber I follow has complained about having
  videos demonetized this week. Subjects ranging from video game
  reviews to body dysmorphic disorder.It really seems they've
  bitten off more than their machine learning algorithms can chew
  here.
 
  jmcdiesel - 2 hours ago
  I dont think the problem is automation...It's people's
  expectation for it to be perfect, and the egoic drive to blame
  someone when something goes wrong.  There was no reason for the
  hype around this story... an AI determinator had a false
  positive.  Thats not google attacking the videos, thats a
  technical issue and it needs to have zero feelings involved
  because the entire process happened in a damned computer
  incapable of feelings...But everyone needs to feed their outrage
  porn addiction...
 
    megous - 2 hours ago
    Read the article. It says that humans made the final decisions.
 
    [deleted]
 
    colordrops - 2 hours ago
    It's not a technical issue.  Software is not yet capable of
    accurate content detection, and even if it were, it's not clear
    whether this sort of thing should be automated.  It's not like
    google can just change a few lines of code and the problem is
    gone.
 
      jmcdiesel - 2 hours ago
      The point is, there will be false positives, there is no
      reason to get upset and hurt over them...There is no perfect
      system.  If its automated, there will be false positives (and
      negatives), if there is a human involved, you have a clear
      bias issue, if there is a group of humans involved, you have
      societal bias to deal with...There is no perfect system for
      something like this, to the best answer is to use something
      like this, that gets it right most of the time... then clean
      up when it makes a mistake.  And you shouldn't have to
      apologize for the false positive, people need to put on their
      big boy pants and stop pretending to be the victim when there
      is no victim to begin with...
 
        saurik - 2 hours ago
        This is the exact same argument for "stop and frisk", and
        that is just totally NOT OK.
 
          tree_of_item - 2 hours ago
          It's not the exact same argument because stop and frisk
          is not automated.
 
          saurik - 29 minutes ago
          If isn't the same process being defended, but I clearlt
          didn't claim that: the argument used to defend the
          different processes, however, is the same. This "put on
          your big boy pants" bullshit is saying that people should
          accept any incidental harassment because false positives
          are to be tolerated and no system is perfect, so we may
          as well just use this one. If the false positives of a
          system discriminate against a subset of people--as
          absolutely happens with these filters, which end up
          blocking people from talking about the daily harassment
          they experience or even using the names of events they
          are attending without automated processes flagging their
          posts--then that is NOT
          OK.https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/for-
          facebook...https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2017/07/facebook-
          censoring-lesbi...
 
          jmcdiesel - 1 hours ago
          Thats exactly the OPPOSITE of stop and frisk.1) Stop and
          frisk is BIASED heavily on race becuase its a HUMAN
          making the choice...2) Stop and Frisk is the GOVERNMENT,
          and therefore actually pushes up against the
          constitution.How do you see these things are remotely the
          same?
 
          saurik - 32 minutes ago
          The false positives are not random: they target
          minorities; these automated algorithms designed to filter
          hate have also been filtering people trying to talk about
          the hate they experience on a daily basis. They keep
          people from even talking about events they are attending,
          such as Dykes on Bikes. It is NOT OK to tell these people
          to "put on their big boy pants" and put up with their
          daily dose of bullshit from the establishment.https://www
          .washingtonpost.com/business/economy/for-
          facebook...https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2017/07/facebook-
          censoring-lesbi...
 
          [deleted]
 
      ajross - 2 hours ago
      > It's not a technical issue. Software is not yet capable of
      accurate content detection,Your second sentence is a
      technical argument, which makes your first a lie.  Obviously
      Google disagreed, which is why they put this system into
      place.  And if they were wrong about that they were wrong for
      technical reasons, not moral ones.I mean, you can say there's
      a policy argument about accuracy vs. "justice" or whatever.
      It's a legitimate argument, and you can fault Google for a
      mistake here.  But given that this was an automated system
      it's disingenuous to try to make more of this than is
      appropriate.
 
        colordrops - 2 hours ago
        If you just stare at the words and ignore my meaning, sure.
        But saying this is a technical problem is like saying that
        climate change is a technical problem because we haven't
        got fusion reactors working yet.
 
          ajross - 2 hours ago
          Then I don't understand what your words mean.  Climate
          change is a technical problem and policy solutions are
          technical.My assumption was that you were contrasting
          "technical" problems (whether or not Google was able to
          do this analysis in an automated way) with "moral" ones
          (Google was evil to have tried this).  If that's not what
          you mean, can you spell it out more clearly?
 
          lovich - 1 hours ago
          Is there any problem you wouldn't frame as technical
          then? If the software isn't anywhere close to capable
          enough to do this task and YouTube decides to use it
          anyway that is a management problem. Otherwise literally
          every problem is technical and we just don't have the
          software to fix it yet
 
          ajross - 29 minutes ago
          Sure: "Should Google be involved in censoring extremist
          content?".  There's a moral question on exactly this
          issue.  And the answer doesn't depend on whether it's
          possible for Google to do it or not.What you guys and
          your downvotes are doing is trying to avoid making an
          argument on the moral issue directly (which is hard) and
          just taking potshots at Google for their technical
          failure as if it also constitutes a moral failure.  And
          that's not fair.If they shouldn't be doing this they
          shouldn't be doing this.  Make that argument.
 
          colordrops - 1 hours ago
          If you believe climate change is a technical problem then
          there isn't much point continuing this discussion.  Using
          that logic you could claim that any problem is technical
          because everything is driven by the laws of physics.
 
    PhasmaFelis - 1 hours ago
    Your whole premise is wrong, because the final decisions were
    made by humans. But even if they weren't, you're still
    mistaken. If you write a program to do an important task, it is
    your responsibility to see that it's both tested and supervised
    to make sure it does it properly. Google wasn't malicious here,
    but it was dangerously irresponsible.
 
762236 - 3 hours ago
Automation is the only real solution. These types of conversations
seem to always overlook how normal people don't want to watch such
videos. Do you want to spend your day watching this stuff to grade
them?
 
  vacri - 1 hours ago
  People also don't want to spend their day scrubbing toilets, but
  there are plenty of janitors out there.
 
  EpicEng - 2 hours ago
  Yet youtube is admitting that the videos should not have been
  pulled, and there's no AI in the world that could have made the
  right call here.  So... what sort of automation are you
  suggesting? It seems as though the real solution is the exact
  opposite of what you're proposing; human review by better trained
  personnel with clearly defined criteria.
 
    762236 - 24 minutes ago
    This is irresponsible to the trained personnel. We have job
    safety requirements for people working on assembly lines. We
    should also have psychological safety for people, and there are
    lots of stories of employees that are paid to view the toxic
    videos suffering (even developing PTSD).
 
  em3rgent0rdr - 2 hours ago
  "Do you want to spend your day watching this stuff to grade
  them?"What about providing more tools for community to categorize
  disturbing videos other than simply "flag".
 
    ben_w - 2 hours ago
    I will literally never choose to watch a disturbing but real
    event. War crimes, either in the form of documenting them or
    promoting them, will be flagged as "people like Ben never click
    on previews of this video, don't waste time suggesting it to
    them in future". I won't even get as far as the page the flag
    button is on, never mind any other options.
 
  paganel - 1 hours ago
  >  These types of conversations seem to always overlook how
  normal people don't want to watch such videosThat makes me not
  normal, I guess. Plus, the NSFL videos were almost instantly
  taken off YT immediately after having been uploaded, what had
  remained was really interesting stuff documenting the war in
  Syria (or at least interesting for people such as myself, a guy
  interested in wars and conflicts in general).
 
  hnaccy - 34 minutes ago
  So hire abnormal people?I'm pretty sure there's a healthy chunk
  of population who would be unfazed and would love a cushy job
  judging videos.
 
norea-armozel - 3 hours ago
I think YouTube really needs to hire more humans to review flagging
of videos rather than leave it to a loose set of algorithms and
swarming behavior of viewers. They assume wrongly that anyone who
flags a video is honest. They should always assume the opposite and
err on the side of caution. And this should also apply to any
Content ID flagging. It should be the obligation of accusers to
present evidence before taking content down.
 
  schoen - 3 hours ago
  > They assume wrongly that anyone who flags a video is honest.I
  don't think they assume that at all. If they did, you'd see at
  least an order of magnitude more videos removed.I agree with the
  sentiment of your criticism, but I think we could phrase it more
  in terms of prior probabilities or something about the false
  positive and false negative rate in their review process.
  Flagging of videos is extremely common and even a small amount of
  unreliability in the review process translates into a huge number
  of mistakes.Also, users of the site don't actually agree with
  each other much at all about which removals were in error; we
  could say that there's absolutely abysmal inter-rater reliability
  if the end-users of the site are the "raters" of the quality of
  content removal decisions.Also, most people who flag things don't
  necessarily know much at all about YouTube's terms of service or
  how YouTube has interpreted or applied them in the past, so it's
  hard to be clear on what it means for flaggers to be honest or
  dishonest. Probably the most common meaning of flagging is "ugh,
  I'm upset that this video is up on YouTube".
 
    norea-armozel - 3 hours ago
    The biggest problem, imo, isn't the random flagger but rather
    the concerted actions of groups to flag videos. This is obvious
    in terms of reddit or 4chan users swarming a channel they don't
    like. This kind of behavior needs to be mitigated in some way.
    I think a quick solution would be to force a cool down timer on
    flagging of 24-48 hours for all users to ensure they're not
    abusing the system. That should include random users who file
    DCMA takedowns that aren't partnered with Youtube in some way.
 
      ue_ - 2 hours ago
      Very much agreed on this swarm behaviour. A political channel
      made by a very kind person with nice intentions didn't seem
      to breaking any rules at all, though the /pol/ board on 8chan
      coordinated mass-flagging attacks against his videos twice
      which resulted in his channel being deleted twice.
 
osteele - 1 hours ago
HN discussion of deletion event:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14998429
 
alexandercrohde - 1 hours ago
I think youtube needs to consider backing off regulating political
content.The fact is politics and morality are inherently
intermingled. One can use words like extremist, but sometimes the
extremists are the "correct" ones (like our founding fathers who
orchestrated a revolution). How could any system consistently
categorize "appropriate" videos without making moral judgements?
 
  secfirstmd - 31 minutes ago
  Agree but it's far easier for politicians (May, Rudd, Trump,
  Turnball, Putin, Netanyahu, Xi Jinping, Mugabe, Zuma, Chan-ocha,
  el-Sisi, Erdo?an, Khamenei, Maduro - the list is endless) to
  blame videos on Youtube for radicalising people then it is to
  tackle the long running political, historical and socio-economic
  grievances that fuel the fire.
 
  anotherbrownguy - 17 minutes ago
  Do you think any rich established British company supported the
  American revolution? Why do you expect Google to help anything
  new or different regardless of how "correct" it is? Big
  established players can't afford revolutions, too risky for them.
 
balozi - 1 hours ago
Well, the AI did such a bang?up job sorting out the mess in comment
section that it got promoted to sorting out the videos themselves.
 
  charlesism - 19 minutes ago
  5 minutes reading YouTube comments is enough to make me ill. I
  don't know what a couple hours a day after school would do to a
  person after ten years. We'll all find out, I guess, once this
  generation of kids reaches adulthood.
 
pgnas - 14 minutes ago
YouTube (google) has become the EXACT opposite of what they said
they were not going to do.They are evil.
 
jimmy2020 - 58 minutes ago
i really don't know how to describe my feeling as a syrian when i
know the most important evidence that witnessed the regime crimes
were deleted because of wrong call. And it's really confusing how
artificial algorithm get confused between what is is obvious as
isis propaganda and a family buried under the rubble and this
statement  makes things even worse. mistakenly? because there is so
many videos? just imagine that may happen to any celebs channel.
Will youtube issue the same statement? dont think so.
 
tdurden - 38 minutes ago
Google/YouTube needs to admit defeat in this area and stop trying
to censor, they are doing more harm than good.